Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Parenting Special Needs, Uncategorized

Blog #141~Managing Stress as a Special Needs Parent

Blog #141~Managing Stress as a Special Needs Parent

Let’s face it, parenting is stressful.  Being a parent of a special needs child adds even more stress.  It’s a constant state of being on call 24/7, 365 days of the year.  I have been in this state for 22 years with my son Nick, who has Down syndrome and autism.

This weekend, we attended the National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS) retreat.  It is an opportunity for Nick to have fun swimming, playing and doing music therapy.  We’ve been going to this twice a year for the past 11 years.  It is a great group of folks who get it.  You see we don’t fit in to either the Down syndrome support groups or the autism groups.  But at this retreat, we all can openly discuss the unique problems of raising a child with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism, in addition to  behaviors associated with ADD,ADHD and more.

Nick 2 (2)

At the NADS Down Syndrome and More retreat http://www.nads.org/, Dr. Louis Weiss did a presentation for the parents about taking care of yourself.

He identified areas in our lives that we nurture or neglect:

*Health (mental/physical)

*Relationships (partner, kids, family, friends)

*Work

*Play

Dr. Weiss emphasized the importance of finding your oasis.  How do you recharge your batteries?  What do you do to relax?

relax frog

It is critical to avoid the traps of maladaptive coping for stress with such things as excessive use of drugs/alcohol, sleeping, overeating, withdrawing/avoiding, becoming over-controlling or compulsive (too much screen time or games like candy crush).

Instead, use adaptive coping strategies to restore calm, get centered and refuel.

relax

Adaptive Coping Strategies:

*Mindfulness Practice

*Meditation

*Prayer

*Exercise, eat well, get enough sleep

*Journaling

*Hobbies (gardening, reading, sports, knitting,etc)

*Use organizing techniques for schedules, tasks, etc.

*Support groups (both in person and online)

*Utilize community resources

*Delegate responsibilities and rebalancing the division of tasks

*Setting limits and sticking to them

*Asking for help. Identify sources of support, including professionals.

Taking care of yourself means taking time for you, and doing so without guilt.  Just like the flight attendants demonstrate, put that oxygen mask on yourself first before you place the one on your child.  And you will both breathe a little easier.

oxygen mask

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Facebook @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

pintrest@Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

instagram-logo#nickdsautism

 

 

 

Author:

Teresa is the mother of two boys. Her youngest son, Nick is 23 years old and has special needs including Down syndrome, autism and verbal apraxia. She is a parent advocate, speaker and writer who is currently working on the memoir of raising her son, Nick. You can follow Nick world on our Facebook page and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice of Autism. Find Nick on Instagram@ #nickdsaustism, Twitter @tjunnerstall.

7 thoughts on “Blog #141~Managing Stress as a Special Needs Parent

  1. I’m so glad you have retreat specific to your situation!!This world can only sympathize but those who share your concerns can build you up!
    You are an inspiration in how you deal with everything. The finer the wine, the better the chocolate tastes…. Always Keeping you in my prayers!!

  2. Thanks Theresa! Nick is such a beautiful and handsome young man! He looks so happy and content! I enjoy following Nick, and letting him teach me so much! – Julie Fitzgerald

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