Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Education and Special Needs, IEP (Indivdualized Education Plan)

Blog #199~Take Action Before the School Year Ends

Blog #199~Take Action Before the School Year Ends

How’s the school year going?  If you have a child with special needs; who is non-verbal or limited in speech, it’s difficult to know how they are navigating their day.  This is where you as the parent, have to be pro-active regarding your child’s progress.  Are they achieving the goals set in their Individual Education Plan (IEP)?  As a parent of a child with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism, I’ve learned the importance of staying on top of my son’s progress and behavior while in school.  Mid-year is a critical time to re-evaluate the teaching methods and current goals set in place, to help your child succeed.

Here are five things parents can do now, to take action before the school year ends:

#1 How are you communicating with the school staff?

If you child is non-verbal or limited in speech, it’s imperative to find a way to dispatch information daily via email, text and/or a communication notebook.  Daily reports work can be created and customized to share about your child’s day, like these……

daily check sheet   daily check sheet two

#2 Organize all correspondence with the school and staff.

Use one notebook or binder for all meetings, conferences and IEP’s so you can refer back at anytime.  Keep all documents in this binder regarding your child, so it’s at your fingertips.  Log in dates and times of any correspondence with school.  Keep all school emails in a separate folder, on your computer.

#3 Review your child’s Individual Education Plan (IEP).

The IEP outlines academic and functional goals, supports needed, accommodations and services. Compare the current IEP goals to the quarterly reports.  How much progress has your child made in each goal area?  Are there any red flags (No Progress- NP)?  Make notes of your concerns.  What additional supports or accommodations that might better help your child succeed?

Examples of supports and accommodations:

Ex/ Halls or assemblies are crowded and loud.  The student experiences sensory overload, leading to meltdowns.  Add supports and accommodations such as noise cancelling headphones paired with a break card.  Have the child transition five minutes before the bell rings when the halls are quiet.

Break Icon   noise cancelling headphones

Ex/ Student shuts down to avoids a task, because it is too difficult.  Break down the task into individual steps supported with a visual task strip.  Set them up for success!

counting task strip       Nick packaging door knobs_Habitat_4 (2)

#4 Contact your child’s teacher to discuss ways to keep your child on track for the rest of the school year.

Request a meeting with the IEP team if there are setbacks in behavior, or “No Progress” (NP) being made on IEP goals.  Goals and the behavior plan can be adjusted anytime during the school year.  A meeting may be necessary if there are any new behavior problems that need to be addressed.

Ex/ Student needs motivation to complete work.  Create an incentive chart to work and earn a reward.  Brainstorm with the school staff to find a reward that is highly motivating for the student.  This  particular reward should only available upon completion of tasks.

working for chart

Ex/ Student has difficulties transitioning to the  next activity.  Make visual schedules for the student to navigate their daily routine.  Giving the student control with visuals, will help to reduce anxiety, and foster independent living skills.

APE swimming 006 (4)

Visual timers help a student stay on task, and then transition to the next activity….

visual timer app

#5 Look at the big picture of your child’s current growth and well-being.

Are the current goals ultimately promoting your child’s further education, employment and independent living?  Are the goals meaningful and relevant for their level of performance?

Does your child look forward to going to school each day?  Are there any signs that your child is withdrawing or regressing in performance and behavior?

Make notes and meet with the teacher at any time before the next IEP meeting. Collaborte together with the school IEP team, to make adjustments and accommodations as needed regarding goals and behavior.


Consistent communication, organization, and IEP goal and behavior reviews, are essential for a parent to do, throughout the school year.  Collaboration with the school staff will ensure a strong finish, for the remaining semester.  This will also make team planning for the next school year much easier, with no surprises.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂


Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall



Posted in Adult Day Programs for Special Needs, Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Fun Side of Nick, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs

Winter Update: Nick DS-ASD

Winter Update: Nick DS-ASD

Here’s a look at Nick’s world, and what he’s been up to this winter.  My son Nick, is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  He attends an adult day program which provides a variety of enrichment activities.  These include work time, communication and learning, recreation, cooking, gardening and crafting.  There are monthly theme parties and game time playing Bingo and Yahtzee.  His group enjoyed a variety of community trips to the grocery store, dining out, library and PetSmart.

Nick relaxing at his adult day program….

Nick AID new chair

Turtle time…..

Nick AID turtle

Crafting, Nick made some awesome pillows…..

Bingo Prize Winner!

Nick bingo prize

Community trip to PetSmart……

Nick Petsmart 1              Nick Petsmart 2

Each week, Nick goes on community outings with his respite caregivers, Jodi and Miss R.  They take him out to the movies, library, mall and to restaurants…..

Over the holidays, Nick celebrated with family here in Chicago and in Key West……

Nick Christmas 2017

Fun in the Florida Keys, including a trip to The Hemingway House……

In February, we celebrated Nick’s birthday in Vail.  Did you read last week’s blog #198, about his adventures in Colorado?

It’s been a busy winter packed with loads of fun for Nick!  Seeing all his smiles in the adult day program, community outings and on vacations assures me that he is having a wonderful life.  Having a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism shouldn’t limit a family from getting out and having fun.  I hope these updates bring inspiration to other families who have a child with special needs.

That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa 🙂

To see more of Nick’s world check out these social media sites:

Facebook: @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall





Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs

Blog #198~ Nick’s Adventures in Vail

Blog #198~Nick’s Adventures in Vail

Last week, Nick celebrated his 24th birthday in Vail, Colorado.  Nick has Down syndrome and autism, but this doesn’t limit his ability to enjoy life to its fullest.  My son loves the Disney movie, Snow Dogs.  We made reservations for a dog sledding tour with Mountain Mushers, located in Beaver Creek.  Upon our arrival, the dogs were loud and super excited.  They barked and howled expressing their eagerness to run.  Our guide and musher, Cameron led Nick to Sara, an affectionate dog that would be on our team.  Normally Nick gets shy around dogs but he took a liking to sweet Sara.

Nick, Cameron and Sara…..

Nick petting sara dog

The dogs are a mix of Alaskan Huskies, all happy, friendly and truly loved by the staff.  They were certainly ready to race, as they jumped with eagerness.

Here’s Nick and I, with his Dad posing briefly in the musher position, before we started the tour…..

Sled pic

Our musher, Cameron made sure Nick was comfortable.  Before takeoff, he yelled, “Hike” and the dogs took off quickly.  Nick loved it, as he is such a thrill seeker.  Anytime we ride on a rollercoaster and it ends, he always signs “more”.  So, I knew dog sledding would be right up his alley. Once the tour starts, the dogs quiet down and get into a rhythm.  At this point you hear their paws hitting the ground in unison, and the sound of the snow crunching under the runners.  Mountain Mushers runs the tour on private property, with many hills.  We flew up and up and down them, at a rapid pace.  On occasion we would hit bumps on the trail.  Nick loved that part, laughing and saying “Oh $h*t” each time 🙂

dogs in motion

There is something about being in the mountains amongst the Aspen and Pine trees, that is both peaceful and reverent.  The views are spectacular, and it was interesting to see the large bear claw marks scraping up several Aspen trees.  Halfway through the tour, the dogs get a rest.  The staff provided us with a treat of hot chocolate and homemade pumpkin bread.

dogs resting

One of the dogs on our team is blind, and he is paired with his brother, who helps to guide him.  Even though this dog couldn’t see, he was right in the mix.  Each time our musher called him by name, the blind dog leaped in the air kicking up one leg in elation.  It was an amazing experience that Nick and I will never forget.  He’s been watching the movie Snow Dogs everyday since.

Vail is beautiful, and the views are serene.  Nick enjoyed being with his aunt, uncle and our friends last week.  He got such a kick out of being in the hot tub, while snow flakes flew around us.  Nick smiled, blinking them off of his eyelashes as the blustery breeze gave us a jolt of coolness while we soaked in the steamy bubbles.

We celebrated Nick’s birthday with pasta and his favorite, chocolate cake!

Nick 24 Birthday cake

We wrapped up the week, with a trip to the Continental Divide at Tennessee Pass.  The resort overlooks the Sawatch Mountains, with many groomed trails to ski, hike and snow shoe, along with other Nordic adventures.  Our group took the one mile trail via snow shoeing, cross-country skiing or riding up in a snow mobile.

Nick totally loved riding up the hill, zoom-zoom……

snow mobile

At the top of the hill, we took in a spectacular view, watching the sunset with hues that painted a beautiful canvas in the sky…..

Continental Divide Sunset

Tennessee Pass provides a unique, fine dining experience inside a yurt.  A yurt is a circular domed tent of skins or felt stretched over a collapsible lattice framework and used by pastoral peoples of inner Asia.  The resort offers yurts both for dining and sleeping.  The yurt is rustic and toasty inside, with an exceptional four course dining menu.

Tennessee Pass Cookhouse Yurt……


Dining in the yurt…..

After dinner, we took a fast pace ride down the one mile trail back to the Nordic center.  The stars and constellations shined vividly in the night sky.  Nick giggled with delight as we flew swiftly through the darkness, on the snow mobile.  It was peaceful and exhilarating all at once.

yurt at night

Our vacation and adventures in Vail were remarkable.  I feel blessed to have the opportunity for these unique experiences, and seeing the joy through Nick’s eyes.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

*Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

*Instagram #nickdsautism (I will be posting some video footage of our dog sledding experience, here this week).

*Twitter @tjunnerstall



Posted in Autism, Down syndrome

Blog #193~CNN Hero of the Year 2017: Amy Wright of Bitty & Beau’s Coffee

Blog #193~CNN Hero of the Year: Amy Wright of Bitty & Beau’s Coffee

bitty and beau coffee shop

Last night Anderson Cooper and Kelli Ripa presented the CNN Hero of the Year 2017 award to Amy Wright, who founded Bitty & Beau’s Coffee.  Inspired by her two youngest children, Bitty and Beau, who have Down syndrome, she set out to empower and advocate for people having disabilities by providing meaningful employment.  Amy Wright is the founder and CEO of Bitty & Beau’s Coffee which employs 40 individuals living with intellectual and developmental disabilities ranging from Down syndrome to autism to cerebral palsy.

bitty and beau three

It’s more than a coffee shop…”Bitty and Beau’s Coffee creates a culture where diversity is not just appreciated, its celebrated.”

CNN Heroes is a television special created by CNN to honor individuals who make extraordinary contributions to humanitarian aid and make a difference in their communities.  Amy Wright started a grass-roots movement, opening up Bitty & Beau’s Coffee, which is located in Wilmington, NC.  National statistics have shown that 70% of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are unemployed.  Her mission is to provide purposeful jobs that bring the community together, and helps people with and without disabilities to spend time together.


Congratulations to Amy Wright, CNN Hero of the Year 2017 for creating a culture of inclusion and putting 40 individuals with disabilities to work! With the award, she will receive $100,000 from CNN to grow her cause.

CNN Heroes .jpg

Amy finished her acceptance speech with these powerful words to her children Bitty and Beau who were watching the show at home:

“I would not change you for the world, but I will change the world for you.”

Her powerful statement promotes acceptance and inclusion which I find inspiring.  Bravo to you, Amy Wright and Bitty & Beau’s Coffee for making a difference.

For more information visit the website and social media links:  Follow Bitty & Beau‘s Coffee on Facebook and Instagram!

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow my son Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down syndrome With a Slice of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall



Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #192~Down syndrome-Autism: Green Monday Gift Ideas

Blog #192~Down syndrome-Autism:Green Monday Gift Ideas


It’s green Monday and just two weeks until Christmas.  Here are some gift ideas for individuals having Down syndrome (or a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism, or other special needs) along with their caregivers, teachers/aids, and therapists.  Order T-shirts, hats and totes designed by artists with special needs

My son Nick, wearing a Paper Clouds Apparel shirt designed by Justin Lundeen…

nick fire truck shirt  Features the beautiful photography of artist, Geoffrey Mikol prints, framed art, calendars, coaster sets and greeting cards are available for purchase online….

Geoffrey Mikol picture    Geoffrey Mikol Kelly is a young entrepreneur who has Down syndrome.  She designs and makes fashionable jewelry you can order online….

special sparkle jewelry  Beautiful pottery (bowls, platters, plates, jewelry) by Christian Royal…..



One of the best gifts is an iPad and there are countless apps for learning and play.  If you are looking for a sturdy case, the Go Talk Rugged and Big Grip cases have held up the best…..  


If your child has sensory needs, and likes to do a lot of dropping, check out these toys:

vortx-dropping-coins  marble racemagic-tracks-mega-set-360-piece--A817AA38.zoom

Gifts ideas in located in the archives, type this in the search box: Blog #131~Christmas Ideas for a Child With Special Needs…..


Gift ideas for babies and toddlers with Down syndrome:

Noah’s Dad- Down syndrome Awareness Top 10 gifts for a 7 year old:

Books for caregivers and families, here are a few suggestions and there are more listed in this Blog #144~ Inspiring Books Related to Down syndrome located in the archives……


Gifts book cover    Book An Uncomplicated Life  down syndrome and autism intersect

Please feel free to share this, and any of my blogs with others and on social media.  Also, check out my Pinterest page for more gift recommendations and other helpful information. Do you have any gift suggestions? I’m always looking for unique gift ideas related to Down syndrome and autism to post on my website.  Nick and I wish you all the best as you are preparing to enjoy the holiday season.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂


Follow Nick on Social Media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall





Posted in Adult Day Programs for Special Needs, Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs

Fall Update: Nick DS-ASD

Fall Update: Nick DS-ASD

Time flies when you are having fun, and Nick is having a blast this fall.  My son, Nick is 23 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  He attends an adult day program which provides a wide variety of activities.  Community outings this fall included volunteer jobs, bowling, visits to local parks, fire station, grocery shopping and going out to eat.  His group also works in-house doing gardening, cooking, skill along with communication building using their Augmentative Alternative Communication (AAC) devices.  Nick uses a program called Touch Chat on an iPad for communication.

Nick cooking at his day program…..

Nick cooking meatballs

Nick was very excited to visit the fire station 🙂  He wasted no time buckling up right away….

Nick fire truck

Outside his adult day program, Nick enjoys community visits to the library, mall, parks, shopping, the movies and eating out.  He continues to have “date nights” meeting up with his buddy, Christopher.  We are very grateful to have such caring respite workers, to take him out several times each week.

Fun at the Halloween Store…..

Nick crown

Buddy Up Tennis, see Blog #190 to read all about it @

Nick buddy tennis 2

Nick relaxing at the library.  Make yourself at home there, Big Guy….. 🙂

Nick library

That’s Nick’s world and update for this fall.  I would like to take a moment to thank our respite workers, Lara, Jodi and Kelsey for all they do for Nick and our family.  My son has a full and rich life, and we are grateful to have these supports in place to make this possible.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa 🙂

Want to see more pictures of Nick?  We have a lot more on social media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall



Posted in Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #191~Challenging Behaviors: Why is My Child Acting This Way?

Blog #191~Challenging Behaviors: Why is My Child Acting This Way?


Parents raising a child with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism experience challenging behaviors from their children.  A long holiday weekend can heighten these behaviors with changes in routine and family gatherings.  A child may feel lost in the mix and in need of attention.  They may also experience sensory overload.  These can be shown in a variety of ways, such as increased self-stimulatory/ repetitive behaviors (hand flapping, tapping, turning on water faucets, pushing buttons, shutting or slamming doors),  self-injury (head banging, biting, slapping self), attacking others and property destruction to name a few.  This week I want to focus on WHY a child may be acting out.  When you understand why this might be happening, you can put a better plan in place, in order to support your child.

The first step is to determine what the behavior means.  All behavior is communicating something.  This is where you have to do some detective work.


Keeping a log of behaviors is a great tool to determine what purpose this is serving your child.  It’s helpful to use a Functional Behavior Assessment Form, such as this to gather data:

Functional Behavior Assessment

Data collection will assist you at home and the school IEP team on the who, what, where, when and why’s of the behavior.  What is this behavior trying to communicate?  What need is being expressed through these behaviors?  Is there a pattern of when these behaviors are occurring and what is triggering them?

Ultimately the Functional Behavior Assessment, (also known as a FBA) will reveal what the purpose this behavior serves for the child.  

Let’s put this to use with two behaviors often associated with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism:

*Self-stimulatory or Repetitive Behaviors

*Injurious Behaviors

In the case of self-stimulatory or repetitive behaviors, a child may:

  1. Need more stimulation
  2. Be trying to masking sensory overload
  3. Be upset, anxious or not busy enough

Observe your child, and maybe even try the behavior yourself in order to get an idea of why they are attracted to it.  Repetitive behaviors are often sensory based.  They help to calm and organize the nervous system by releasing stress chemicals.  This in turn can help to reduce anxiety.

My son, Nick is 23 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  He often uses tappers to help regulate his sensory needs.  Here he is at his adult day program:

Nick tappers AID

Bottom line, it’s important to respect these sensory needs and allow your child to have this time during the day.  Find a balance in building in these sensory breaks without letting them take over completely.  Self-stimulatory and repetitive behaviors should not  get in the way of learning, or in work jobs.  Keep in mind, especially around the holidays as you get busy with wrapping presents, cooking and cleaning the house that your child may be bored and feeling ignored.  It is necessary to provide some structured activities to reduce these behaviors.  I like to give my son jobs so he feels helpful, and rewarded for his appropriate behavior with lots of praise.  While I was getting the house ready for Thanksgiving, I had Nick vacuum for me, a job he enjoys doing.  It provides him with good sensory input using heavy work, which can be calming…

Nick vacumme thanksgiving

In the case of injurious behaviors a child may:

  1. Bang head, bite, slap themselves, attack others or destroy property
  2. Be frustrated, angry, experiencing discomfort, pain or sensory overload
  3. Communicate escaping and avoiding an unwanted task or event

Again, the Functional Behavior Assessment chart can help to determine if there is a certain activity, event or time of day which causes these behaviors to escalate.  As the detective, you want to uncover these triggers.  When you figure out these triggers, you can put supports in place to in essence, cut it off at the pass before your child goes into a full-blown meltdown.

Example- Family trip to the shopping mall:

The stimulus overload, especially around the holidays with added crowds,  more kiosks, noises, lights, and may be too much for a child with autism.  You many need to keep the trip short and provide visuals supports to help your child understand the sequence of events that will happen.

Task Strip for shopping mall trip….

task strip mall

Along with a visual schedule, you want to keep your eye open to any distress signals the child may exhibit in their body language.  My son will tend to pinch his cheeks when he is upset or stomp and say, “I’m mad”.  These signs are a cue to back off and lower the demands you are placing on your child.

In summation, you can support your child and prevent these injurious behaviors by:

  1. Recognizing distress signals and re-direct your child.
  2. Lowering or pulling away the demands that have been placed and causing your child to feel overwhelmed.
  3. Providing visual supports with task strips so they know the sequence of events.
  4. Teaching alternative ways to escape and unwanted situation by using visual supports with icons such as, “Stop” “Help” “All Done” and “I Need A Break”:Break Icon
  5. Practice teaching appropriate ways to protest separately in mild stress situations. Use the icons above either with visuals or on a communication device using lots of praise.

Understanding the function of your child’s behavior and creating an environment to support them will lead to success in both home, school and in the community.  If your child has challenging behaviors, seek the help of a trained autism behavior specialist.  You should request that a Functional Behavior Analysis (FBA) be done.  Once this data is collected, a Behavior Support Plan (also known as a BSP) can be created and put in the IEP.   You and the school IEP team can brainstorm on what supports to put in place to help your child better succeed and express themselves more appropriately.

That’s what is in my noggin this week 🙂


Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnnerstall






Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #182~Hurricane Harvey and the Texas Way

Blog #182~Hurricane Harvey and the Texas Way


As a native Texan, I grew up just a few blocks from Galveston Bay.  This was our playground growing up.

Seabrook watching the boats come in, with my siblings in the early 70’s…..

3 investigators

I’ve ridden out my share of hurricanes and tropical storms over the years.  Hurricane Harvey has pounded the Texas Gulf Coast.  It continues to churn, with record rainfall that is causing catastrophic flooding.  I’ve been thinking a lot about my fellow Texans, and dealing with such disasters.  Much of what has giving me strength over the years of raising my son Nick, who is 23 years old, and has Down syndrome and autism, comes from the mentality of the “Texas way”.

The author, John Steinbeck wrote in part, that “Texas is a state of mind”:

“For all its enormous range of space, climate, and physical appearance, and for all the internal squabbles, contentions, and strivings, Texas has a tight cohesiveness perhaps stronger than any other section of America.”

Texans are incredibly proud of where they come from.  The people are friendly to one another, and will go out of their way, to help each other out.

I recall riding out Hurricane Alicia in our home, back in 1983.  The category 3 hurricane hit hard with winds up to 115 mph, during a long, pitch black night.  The next day, we crawled out from under the mattress propped up in the narrow hallway.  We found tree limbs and debris covering the yard and had no electricity.  Our neighbors banded together, bringing their chain saws to clear the rubbish.  We pulled up lawn chairs, and portable gas stoves, to cook up the food that was quickly thawing in the deep freezer.  We stood in long lines together, as comrades waiting to get ice bags, sharing stories together.  For two weeks, with the power lines down.  There was no electricity in the humid and unbearable August heat.  What I remember the most about this time, was the sense of camaraderie.  Everyone was pitching in, lending a hand, and working together.

Hurricane Alicia, 1983……

Hurricane Alicia 1983

Watching the news over the weekend, I again, was witness to this sense of community and teamwork.  The riveting images of civilian Samaritans bringing their boats, rafts, kayaks and canoes in to help with rescue efforts.  Volunteers coming in with high-profile pickups, and dumpster trucks being used to save other human beings.

Rescue efforts after Hurricane Harvey…….

Harvey rescue

I love this message from George and Barbara Bush, to their fellow Houstonians and Texans affected by Harvey, expresses the spirit of Texans: 

“We are praying for of our fellow Houstonians and Texans affected by Harvey, and truly inspired by the flotilla of volunteers–points of light all–who are answering the call to help their neighbors.  We salute them, the first responders and local elected officials for their grit and determination in the face of this extraordinary storm.  This we know: Houston and Texas, will come together and rebuild.”

That’s exactly what it is–coming together, and helping each other, and never backing down.  That’s the Texas way.  When you are down, you’re not out.  That’s when you pick yourself up by the bootstraps, brush off the dust and push through.

This road of raising my son with Down syndrome and autism has not always been an easy one.  The hurdles have been tough. Reaching milestones, the long process of toilet training and the intense meltdowns during puberty took their toll. I wouldn’t have survived, without reaching out for help. I found a community of parents who had children with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  This community saved me.  I know that my strong roots as a Texan, has kept me upright, in the process.  That grit and determination, has helped to push me through some of the roughest times.

The power of human spirit coming together can help to overcome the worst of adversities.  Jumping in and helping each other out, with a warm smile, IS the TEXAS WAY.  Texas will be drenched and soggy for a while, but they will never give up. Texans will pull together, become cohesive, and they will survive!

Please continue to pray, as the water continues to rise up the driveways, and into the homes, of my family and friends in Texas.  I know that they will come together, with resiliency, and get through this catastrophic event.

Here is a link if you would like to help and share on social media: The Houston Flood Relief Fund@

That’s what is in my noggin this week.


Follow Nick:

Down syndrome with a slice of autism on Facebook and Pinterest

#nickdsautism on Instagram

@tjunnerstall on Twitter






Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Education and Special Needs, IEP (Indivdualized Education Plan), Parenting Special Needs

Special Needs Back to School Tips

Special Needs Back to School Tips


Kleenex, glue sticks, crayons, and more, are all jotted down on the shopping list.  It’s that time of year to get ready to go back to school.  But what should you be doing as a parent of a child with special needs?  I’ve got 5 great tips to get you started on the right track!

5 Back to School Tips for Special Needs Parents:

Click here to view these 5 tips-

Make it a great school year, that’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall