Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Education and Special Needs

Blog #186~Down syndrome:How to Promote Inclusiveness in School

Blog #186~Down syndrome: How to Promote Inclusiveness in School

DSAwarenessMagnet     Peer Partners

October is Down syndrome Awareness Month.  This is an ideal time to promote inclusiveness in your child’s school.  Forming a partnership with your child’s education team is the key to a successful inclusion experience.

Here are a few resources and suggestions on how to advocate for inclusion in your child’s school environment and classroom:

*Send an “All About Me” introduction about your child to the teacher.  There are many ideas, templates and apps that are available online.  This is especially helpful, if your child’s speech is limited or non-verbal.

all about me app

*Share inclusion resources with your child’s teacher:

  • Meaningful Inclusion for Students With Down Syndrome: A Resource for Elementary Educators. http://www.mdsc.org/infojustforyou/EdManual.cfm
  • The Inclusive Class: http://www.theinclusiveclass.com/
  • Inclusion in the Classroom-Tips and Resources: http://allbornin.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Inclusion_Classroom_Tips.pdf
  • Donate books to the library and classroom:               I can Can you  Paint the Octopus Red  My Friend has DS

*Topics on Down Syndrome, that are helpful for teaching from Woodbine House Publishing: http://www.woodbinehouse.com/  Books related to Down syndrome are ON SALE during the month of October!

Whole Child Reading         Down syndrome and autism intersect2      Teaching Math to DS        fine motor skills and DS

Working with the school team to promote an understanding about Down syndrome, and a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism has many benefits.  It will help students in general education classes feel less anxious and reduce misconceptions they may have had.  Building this bridge together, will lead to a meaningful learning experience for everyone in the school.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

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Instgram@ #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month

October is Down syndrome Awareness Month

DS-Awareness-Month

October is Down syndrome Awareness Month.  I’ve had the privilege of raising my son,  for the past 23 years.  Nick has Down syndrome and autism. He has touched my life, and those of so many others along the way.

nick-senior-alarm-pic

Down syndrome awareness is about promoting acceptance and inclusion of all individuals with Down syndrome.

FACTS about Down syndrome from National Down Syndrome Society (NDSS):

*Down syndrome occurs when an individual has a full or partial extra copy of chromosome 21. This additional genetic material alters the course of development and causes the characteristics associated with Down syndrome.

*There are three types of Down syndrome: trisomy 21 (nondisjunction) accounts for 95 percent of cases, translocation accounts for about 4 percent and mosaicism accounts for about 1 percent.

*Down syndrome is the most commonly occurring chromosomal condition. One in every 691 babies in the United States is born with Down syndrome.

*There are more than 400,000 people living with Down syndrome in the United States.

*Down syndrome occurs in people of all races and economic levels.

*The incidence of births of children with Down syndrome increases with the age of the mother. But due to higher fertility rates in younger women, 80 percent of children with Down syndrome are born to women younger than 35.

*People with Down syndrome have an increased risk for certain medical conditions such as congenital heart defects, respiratory and hearing problems, Alzheimer’s disease, childhood leukemia and thyroid conditions. Many of these conditions are now treatable, so most people with Down syndrome lead healthy lives.

*A few of the common physical traits of Down syndrome are low muscle tone, small stature, an upward slant to the eyes and a single deep crease across the center of the palm. Every person with Down syndrome is a unique individual and may possess these characteristics to different degrees or not at all.

*Life expectancy for people with Down syndrome has increased dramatically in recent decades — from 25 years old in 1983 to 60 years old today.

*People with Down syndrome attend school, work and participate in decisions that affect them, and contribute to society in many wonderful ways.

*All people with Down syndrome experience cognitive delays, but the effect is usually mild to moderate and is not indicative of the many strengths and talents that each individual possesses.

*Quality educational programs, a stimulating home environment, good health care and positive support from family, friends and the community enable people with Down syndrome to develop their full potential and lead fulfilling lives.

More information @http://www.ndss.org/Down-Syndrome/What-Is-Down-Syndrome/

NDSS_logo

Here are a few simple ways to promote Down syndrome awareness:

*Post something about Down syndrome on social media

*Send updates, pictures and tell your story to your family doctor and OB-gyn.

*Many local Down syndrome support groups have promotional materials, like books and bookmarks that can be distributed at libraries and schools.

*Many local DS support groups have public speakers who can talk to schools, businesses, community groups, hospitals, and other organizations.

*Support or volunteer for local fundraisers like the Buddy Walk in your community @http://www.ndss.org/buddy-walk/

*Encourage your kids to volunteer for Special Olympics and Best Buddies programs through their school.

Down syndrome journey

Thank you for supporting Down syndrome awareness this month!  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Parenting Special Needs

Blog #185~ Down Syndrome: Supporting Positive Behavior

Blog #185~Down Syndrome: Supporting Positive Behavior

This month’s blog posts have focused on behavior management, specifically to individuals who have Down syndrome and autism.  I recently read, Supporting Positive Behavior in Children and Teens with Down Syndrome.  This book by pediatric psychologist, David S. Stein gives a comprehensive breakdown of how to deal with challenging behaviors, with a specific look at how the brain of a person with Down syndrome works.

Book Supporting Positive Behavior DS

This book is a must read for anyone who cares for, or works with, a child or teen with Down syndrome.  I only wish that this book had been available when 23-year-old son, Nick, was younger.  One of the key messages from this book, is how to look at behavior.  If you view a bad behavior as willful or intentional, the immediate reaction is to punish.  However, it is important to consider that the behavior is communicating some need.  The first section of this book, dives into the brain of a child with Down syndrome and cover behavior basics “101”.

In chapter 5, there is a step by step guide to behavior management system designed for children with Down syndrome:

Step 1:  Maintain the relationship (keep it positive)

Step 2:  Structure the environment for success

Step 3:  Use visuals, visuals, visuals

Step 4:  Notice good behaviors and set up token economies

Step 5:  Use proactive strategies to prevent negative behaviors and support positive behaviors

Step 6:  Manage the difficult situation before they happen 

The underlying theme in this book is how you approach behaviors.  Acknowledge that the behavior is NOT a willful or intentional act designed to make you upset.  Instead, view the behavior as an expression of some unmet need or challenge that has not been addressed.

“You can respond to a behavior thoughtfully, rather than emotionally.  You can learn to respond…but don’t react.”

Throughout the book, this is the common thread.  Respond… but don’t react.  Take your emotions out of the equation, and sometimes your gut reaction as well.  There are several chapters that address positive behavior management at home, school, community and with siblings.

When disciplining or responding to behavior, here’s what you should and should not do:

 You should:

*Take away eye contact.

*Keep your facial expressions neutral.

*Speak very little, if at all.

*Keep your tone of voice neutral.

*Keep your emotions in control.

*If removing attention and emotions is not enough, then direct the child to “take a break”.

And you should not:

*Look right at the child

*Make angry or upset faces.

*Try to explain, using words, why or what they did was horrible.

*Speak in a harsh, animated way.

*Show strong emotions.

Whenever possible, look for ways to prevent the behavior in the first place.  Try to determine what is causing the behavior, and what this functions serves the child.

There are often times which may be more difficult and cause more behavior problems.  These often occur in transition times, and especially during puberty.  These are addressed specifically in this book, along with when and how to seek help from a certified behavior specialist.

This book, Supporting Positive Behavior in Children and Teens with Down syndrome, is a concise guide to understanding behavior and how to manage it thoughtfully, by responding and not reacting to meet a child’s needs.  David S. Stein, packed a lot of punch into 132 pages.  I highly recommend adding this book to the cart.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

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Posted in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #184~ Addressing Problem Behaviors in Individuals with DS/ASD

Blog #184~Addressing Problem Behaviors in Individuals with DS/ASD

Problem behaviors in individuals with Down syndrome and autism (DS/ASD), are very common.  Speech deficits, make it difficult to communicate wants and needs.  Often individuals with DS/ASD, may exhibit problem behaviors to communicate something.  Last week I participated in a webinar about addressing such behaviors, led by Sam Towers (http://sam@towersbehavior.com), that was hosted by The Down Syndrome Association of Minnesota.  Here is a summary of this webinar on addressing problem behaviors in individuals with DS/ASD.

First of all, it is important to build rapport.   Establish a friendship with kindness, and positive activities that the individual enjoys.  This will provide the basis for teaching the person, that there are other ways, besides problem behavior, for achieving goals.  Sam suggested a 10:1 ratio of praising good behaviors.  Praise encourages the individual to do it again.

Why do people use problem behaviors?

1.Get attention

2.Get something

3.Escape or avoid something unpleasant

4.Get a pleasant sensation

All behaviors allow a person to achieve a goal, because the payoff is reinforcement.  You get what you pay more attention to.  The idea is to avoid letting problem behaviors have a payoff.  So, focus ALOT more on addressing the good behaviors.  This can be done by building skills, through teaching replacement behaviors.  If a child is throwing things to get attention, the replacement behavior could be to teach them to tap you on the shoulder or use their communication device.

My son Nick is 23 years old and has a dual diagnosis of DS/ASD.  He has many behaviors that are used to get attention or something, and provide a pleasant sensation.  Part of the autism piece is sensory related.  Flushing the toilet repeatedly, pushing the microwave fan or phone intercom buttons are ways that he stims, which is a form of self-entertainment.  One suggestion, for this would be to teach other ways for him to entertain himself.  Some supports that I recommend, are to use social stories, redirect to an AAC (Aumentative Alternative Communication) device, PECS (Picture Exchange Communication) book, or create a choice board.

Choice Boards:

choice boards

If an individual is trying to get out of an activity, they may exhibit behaviors like self-injury, yelling, or stop-drop and plop.  In these cases, it’s important to provide supports like, a first-then charts, “take a break” card, noise cancelling headphones, a visual schedule, or a timed timer.

timer app    first then  1,2,3,4 Sprite

Bottom line, you can’t let the problem behavior become the payoff.  The single most effective way to get rid of a problem behavior, is to arrange things so that there is no payoff (reinforcement) for the behavior. Completely withholding reinforcement can be difficult, and often leads to an increase in the behavior.  This is called an extinction boost.  But if you stick to your guns, this will result in the behavior decreasing.  The key is to be consistent in not rewarding the undesirable behavior.  If it is reinforced intermittently, it will cause the behavior to be more long-lasting, because there is still some payoff for the individual.

Understanding the reasons people use problem behaviors, building skills and supports to teach replacement behaviors, praising 10:1 good behaviors, and arranging things so that there is no payoff for the problem behavior are all great tools for addressing problem behaviors in individuals with DS/ASD.  Here are a few resources which may also help:

Edward Carr Book    Social Story Book  visual strategies book

When Down Syndrome and Autism Intersect,
edited by Margaret Froehlke and Robin Zaborek:  

down syndrome and autism intersect

A special thank you to the Down Syndrome Association of Minnesota and Sam Towers of Towers Behavior Services for an informative webinar.  Now, it’s time to make a new choice board for Nick.  Have a great week, everyone.

That’s what is in my noggin this week! 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism on Facebook and Pinterest

#nickdsautism on Instagram

@tjunnerstall on Twitter

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #182~Hurricane Harvey and the Texas Way

Blog #182~Hurricane Harvey and the Texas Way

Hurricane+Harvey+1280x720

As a native Texan, I grew up just a few blocks from Galveston Bay.  This was our playground growing up.

Seabrook watching the boats come in, with my siblings in the early 70’s…..

3 investigators

I’ve ridden out my share of hurricanes and tropical storms over the years.  Hurricane Harvey has pounded the Texas Gulf Coast.  It continues to churn, with record rainfall that is causing catastrophic flooding.  I’ve been thinking a lot about my fellow Texans, and dealing with such disasters.  Much of what has giving me strength over the years of raising my son Nick, who is 23 years old, and has Down syndrome and autism, comes from the mentality of the “Texas way”.

The author, John Steinbeck wrote in part, that “Texas is a state of mind”:

“For all its enormous range of space, climate, and physical appearance, and for all the internal squabbles, contentions, and strivings, Texas has a tight cohesiveness perhaps stronger than any other section of America.”

Texans are incredibly proud of where they come from.  The people are friendly to one another, and will go out of their way, to help each other out.

I recall riding out Hurricane Alicia in our home, back in 1983.  The category 3 hurricane hit hard with winds up to 115 mph, during a long, pitch black night.  The next day, we crawled out from under the mattress propped up in the narrow hallway.  We found tree limbs and debris covering the yard and had no electricity.  Our neighbors banded together, bringing their chain saws to clear the rubbish.  We pulled up lawn chairs, and portable gas stoves, to cook up the food that was quickly thawing in the deep freezer.  We stood in long lines together, as comrades waiting to get ice bags, sharing stories together.  For two weeks, with the power lines down.  There was no electricity in the humid and unbearable August heat.  What I remember the most about this time, was the sense of camaraderie.  Everyone was pitching in, lending a hand, and working together.

Hurricane Alicia, 1983……

Hurricane Alicia 1983

Watching the news over the weekend, I again, was witness to this sense of community and teamwork.  The riveting images of civilian Samaritans bringing their boats, rafts, kayaks and canoes in to help with rescue efforts.  Volunteers coming in with high-profile pickups, and dumpster trucks being used to save other human beings.

Rescue efforts after Hurricane Harvey…….

Harvey rescue

I love this message from George and Barbara Bush, to their fellow Houstonians and Texans affected by Harvey, expresses the spirit of Texans: 

“We are praying for of our fellow Houstonians and Texans affected by Harvey, and truly inspired by the flotilla of volunteers–points of light all–who are answering the call to help their neighbors.  We salute them, the first responders and local elected officials for their grit and determination in the face of this extraordinary storm.  This we know: Houston and Texas, will come together and rebuild.”

That’s exactly what it is–coming together, and helping each other, and never backing down.  That’s the Texas way.  When you are down, you’re not out.  That’s when you pick yourself up by the bootstraps, brush off the dust and push through.

This road of raising my son with Down syndrome and autism has not always been an easy one.  The hurdles have been tough. Reaching milestones, the long process of toilet training and the intense meltdowns during puberty took their toll. I wouldn’t have survived, without reaching out for help. I found a community of parents who had children with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  This community saved me.  I know that my strong roots as a Texan, has kept me upright, in the process.  That grit and determination, has helped to push me through some of the roughest times.

The power of human spirit coming together can help to overcome the worst of adversities.  Jumping in and helping each other out, with a warm smile, IS the TEXAS WAY.  Texas will be drenched and soggy for a while, but they will never give up. Texans will pull together, become cohesive, and they will survive!

Please continue to pray, as the water continues to rise up the driveways, and into the homes, of my family and friends in Texas.  I know that they will come together, with resiliency, and get through this catastrophic event.

Here is a link if you would like to help and share on social media: The Houston Flood Relief Fund@ https://www.youcaring.com/victimsofhurricaneharvey-915053

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Down syndrome with a slice of autism on Facebook and Pinterest

#nickdsautism on Instagram

@tjunnerstall on Twitter

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness

Blog #181~Iceland and Down syndrome

Blog #181~Iceland and Down syndrome

Last week CBS News ran a story about Down syndrome in Iceland. The CBS report opens like this:
“With the rise of prenatal screening tests across Europe and the United States, the number of babies born with Down syndrome has significantly decreased, but few countries have come as close to eradicating Down syndrome births as Iceland.”

cbsn-oa-agusta

“On 14 August 2017, CBS News ran a segment for their program “CBSN: On Assignment” in which correspondent Elaine Quijano traveled to Iceland to report on that country’s disappearing incidence of Down syndrome. Since prenatal screening tests were introduced in Iceland in the early 2000s, the vast majority of women — close to 100 percent — who received a positive test for Down syndrome terminated their pregnancy.”

To view the story click here:
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/down-syndrome-iceland/

I’m going to throw my two cents in about this news story. This week’s blog is not a debate about a moral decision of whether to choose to have a baby with Down syndrome. It’s not my place to comment if someone decides to terminate a pregnancy for whatever reason.  I can only speak from own experience of having a child with Down syndrome. My son Nick is 23 years old and has Down syndrome and autism.

There are 3 comments that I would like to make regarding this news story:

*1. Expectant parents should first do their research first and get the facts. Doctors often know little about Down syndrome beyond their own medical experience. The delivery of news about the possibility of a baby having Down syndrome is often delivered grimly and with pity. This was the case in my son. I would like to see the medical community and society to become more educated on Down syndrome. When you know the facts, you can make an informed decision that is not based on fear.

Here are a few good places to get the facts about Down syndrome:
http://www.ndss.org/Down-Syndrome/Down-Syndrome-Facts/
http://www.ndsccenter.org/new-and-expectant-parents/
*2. Down syndrome in and of itself, is nothing to fear. Yes, there are health issues associated with Down syndrome. Click here to view: http://www.ndss.org/Resources/Health-Care/Associated-Conditions/

A baby with Down syndrome may take a little longer to reach developmental milestones. But, with early intervention with physical, occupational and speech therapy can guide a baby/child with Down syndrome to hit those marks.  Sometimes, we fear what we don’t know or understand.  When you get educated about the facts, it will help to reduce the fear.

*3. Society needs to see more of what Down syndrome looks like. Persons with Down syndrome are people first! “The Emmy winning A&E show, Born this Way follows a group of seven young adults born with Down syndrome as they pursue their passions and lifelong dreams, explore friendships, romantic relationships and work, all while defying society’s expectations.”  I wish the whole world could have access to this great show! Click here for more information: http://www.aetv.com/shows/born-this-way

btway

Another excellent site I highly recommend is Noah’s Dad!  I’ve had the extreme pleasure of following Noah’s Dad and his journey with his son, who in entering first grade this year. He gives us a view of how full, and rich their lives are having Noah in it. You can find Noah’s Dad-Down Syndrome Awareness on Facebook and at http://noahsdad.com/

You can also follow my son, Nick on Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice of Autism, Instagram @nickdsautism and Twitter #tjunnerstall

Nick scuba diving in the Diveheart program……

Diveheart 2013 336

Down syndrome is nothing to be feared once you know the facts, and see what the lives of these wonderful individuals are like. It has been a true privilege being Nick’s mom. He has taught me more about life, and made me a much better person in the process. I couldn’t imagine a world without people like Nick and others, who have Down syndrome.  I’m 100% sure that anyone who has been touched by Nick, would say the same.

scan0016

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂
~Teresa

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Education and Special Needs, IEP (Indivdualized Education Plan), Parenting Special Needs

Special Needs Back to School Tips

Special Needs Back to School Tips

backtoschool1

Kleenex, glue sticks, crayons, and more, are all jotted down on the shopping list.  It’s that time of year to get ready to go back to school.  But what should you be doing as a parent of a child with special needs?  I’ve got 5 great tips to get you started on the right track!

5 Back to School Tips for Special Needs Parents:

Click here to view these 5 tips- https://nickspecialneeds.com/2016/08/22/blog-153special-needs-back-to-school-tips/

Make it a great school year, that’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs

Blog #176~ Special Needs Summer Recreation Programs

Blog #176~Special Needs Summer Recreation Programs

The heat is on!  Are you looking into programs for your child with special needs this summer?  There are many types of programs available including camps, athletic and leisure programs.  A great place to start is to contact your local park district to see if they offer any special recreation programs.  For programs in here in Illinois click on this link: http:// www.specialrecreation.org

Here are some links for special needs summer programs:

Special Olympics- http:// www.specialolympics.org

Buddy Up Tennis- http:// www.buddyuptennis.com

Top Soccer- http://www.topsoccer.us

I Can Ride Bike Camps- https://www.icanshine.org

Easter Seals- http://www.easterseals.com

Gi Gi’s Playhouse- https://www.gigisplayhouse.org

American Camp Association- https://acacamps.org

Very Well has a list of Inclusive Sports Programs- https://www.verywell.com/special-needs-sports-programs-3106922

Friendship Circle List of Camps- http://www.friendshipcircle.org/blog/2013/02/13/25-summer-camps-for-individuals-with-special-needs/

Diveheart Scuba program- http://diveheart.org

Diveheart 2013 336

My son Nick (pictured above), is 23 years old and has Down syndrome and autism.  He has participated in many of these programs over the years.  These include Special Olympics, Challenger Baseball League, Top Soccer, swim lessons, Diveheart and I Can Shine Bike Camp.  During the summer months he also attended ESY (Extended Summer Year) summer school.  These programs helped him to learn new skills, have a structured routine, and develop friendships.

Nick at ESY Summer School…..

 

I Can Shine Bike Camp….

photo (124)

Many of these programs are available for children with special needs throughout the U.S.  My son Nick had great experiences in participating in these programs.  If you know of a program you would like to share, please contact me.  I’m always updating my resource list on this website and sharing them with other support groups.  Here’s to a great summer 🙂

That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Doctors and Dentists, Down syndrome

Blog #175~ Dentist Visits for Special Needs

Blog #175~Dentist Visits for Special Needs

teeth emoji

Taking a child with special needs to the dentist can be challenging.  It ranks right up there with hair cuts and blood draws at the medical lab.  My son Nick is 23 years old, and has Down syndrome and autism.  His speech deficits and sensory issues makes it difficult to get a proper dental examination and cleaning.  Now that Nick is an adult, we changed from a pediatric dentist to one that specializes in working with adults with special needs.  The experience for my son went very well, and here’s why it was successful.

Here are 5 tips to help with dentist visits for special needs:

*1- Find a dentist who specializes in working with persons having special needs.  Get referrals from other families and therapists.

*2- Request to schedule the appointment during the quiet time at the office.

*3- Create a social story either with a written checklist or pictures for your child to follow.  For a child with autism, if they can see it, then they can understand it.  This guide will be like a map to follow, and can help to lessen anxiety.

I printed a social story from Google Images and added a highly preferred reward of Taco Bell at the end of the visit:

dentist social story

At home we have a tooth brushing sequence laminated for Nick to follow.  You can print this PDF out for your child to use:  teeth

*4- The dentist should take the time to go at your child’s pace, based on their sensitivity and level of anxiousness.  His new dentist allotted plenty of time to ease into the exam, and for Nick to get comfortable with him.  Nick didn’t want to sit in the chair right away, even with my point prompts to the social story.  First, they put one of his favorite cartoons on the flat screen TV.  Then, the dentist put his gloved hands out for Nick to touch and get use to the feel and texture.  After a few minutes along with a several high-five and elbow bumps, Nick sat down in the chair.  He continued to narrow the gap of proximity, so that Nick was could get use to him being close.

On the first visit, the dentist was able to do brief examination and brush Nick’s teeth counting to 23 (his age) twice.  He took several breaks, giving lots of praise and elbow bumps.  We scheduled another visit three weeks later to try to build Nick’s tolerance level and continue to develop their relationship.  On the second visit, he was more at ease, sitting down in the chair right away.  The dentist completed a deeper examination, as Nick was able to tolerate even more this time.  He was able to clean, floss and even brush fluoride on Nick’s teeth!

Nick dentist two

*5- The key to having success on these visits was allowing time for Nick to feel more relaxed and establishing trust.  The dentist worked slowly to desensitize, picking up on any verbal or non-verbal cues.  He adjusted his pace accordingly, to match what my son could handle.  His dentist understood the importance of building this trust and relationship, thus earning the right to provide more clinical care.

The tips of *1-finding the right dentist, *2-scheduling appointments during off times, *3-providing a social story, *4-breaking down the examination slowly and *5-establishing a trusting relationship, all helped greatly to lead to successful dentist visits.

If your child has sensitivities, you may also want to see if they can tour the office before the appointment.  If need be, ask if the lighting can be adjusted and whether they offer the use of a weighted vest (which provides deep pressure which can be calming).  In some cases, it may be necessary to sedate a child that is uncooperative or needs more advanced care.

At this time with my son, we will continue to build on the solid foundation we’ve begun with his new dentist without the use of sedation for as long as possible.  These baby steps helped to lessen Nick’s anxiety for dental visits in the future.  I appreciate the time, care and concern for my son’s best interests in providing such a positive experience.  That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall