Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, IEP (Indivdualized Education Plan), Physical Therapy and Special Needs, Speech and Occupational Therapy

Blog #152~Lessons From Olympian Simone Biles

Blog #152~Lessons From Olympian Simone Biles

After winning individual gold in the women’s gymnastics all-around on Thursday, Simone Bile’s, in an interview, made a declaration. “I’m not the next Usain Bolt or Michael Phelps,” she said. “I’m the first Simone Biles.”

Simone Biles

Before going to teach spinning class last week, I was rushing around the house getting ready.  Out of the corner of my eye, I caught a glimpse of the Good Morning America interview featuring gold medalist, Simone Biles at the Rio 2016 Summer Olympics.  It struck me that this pint-sized, power house had 4 training tips that packed a lot of punch. I grabbed my coffee, pen and pad to jot down a few bullet points.

Having a child with special needs presents many obstacles in life.  I’ve had my share of them with my son Nick, for the past 22 years.  Nick has Down syndrome and autism.  The low muscle tone (a trait of having Down syndrome) delayed him from reaching gross motor milestones until much later than most babies.  He didn’t sit up until a year old, and he didn’t walk until he was 3 ½ years old.  Nick had to work a lot harder to hit those targets with years of physical therapy.  We’ve also spent 22 years going to speech and occupational therapy to help feeding, communication along with fine motor, sensory issues.

It has been quite a journey, which brings me back to those bullet points I scribbled down.  In the Good Morning America interview, Simone offered up some advice on her training regimen.  They are 4 simple lessons, and my take on they apply to raising a child with special needs:

  1. Enjoy the Ride

The journey isn’t always going to be easy.  It’s going to take a lot of hard work and shedding tears.  And that’s to be expected.  But, find a way to embrace the journey.  Have some fun as you go, and surround yourself with people who make you laugh.

  1. Never Give Up

There will be days, weeks and months where you see no progress.  Sometimes mistakes will be made.  That’s when you pick yourself up and trust that you can do it no matter what.

  1. Trust Your Squad

The fierce five huddled, cheered each other on, and believed in other.  When you have a child with special needs, you have to get a good squad together to help push them to succeed.  This includes the IEP team along with outside therapists.  Huddle in from time to time, and always keep the lines of communication open.  Make sure all the goals and dreams for your child are in sync.  Parents should have their own squad of friends and support groups you feel comfortable with.  Your squad understands the insurmountable pressure faced when raising a child with special needs.

Fab 5 Rio

4. Treat Yourself

After a competition, Simone (whether she wins or not) enjoys pepperoni pizza.  Parents of special needs kids spend a lot more time and energy helping their child reach goals.  It is beyond exhausting. Get a respite worker to watch your child.  Find the things that you enjoy and indulge.  Go out to lunch with girlfriends, get a manicure, go workout, take a trip to Target (alone), enjoy a nap, have a glass of wine.  Treat yourself, you deserve it.

That’s great advice from the 19-year-old Olympian champion.   Life will always have it ups and downs, twists and turns.  But if you can find a way to embrace the journey, you can hit the top of that podium and be the champion of your own life and your child’s.

Nick wins the gold for the softball throw at the State Special Olympics~2003

Nick Special Olympics

 

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa

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Posted in Down syndrome, Health Issues and Special Needs Child, Physical Therapy and Special Needs, Speech and Occupational Therapy

Blog #127~So, Your Baby has Down syndrome

Blog #127~So, Your Baby has Down syndrome        

In October everything turns pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month. But did you know it’s also Down Syndrome Awareness Month?

Twenty-one years ago I gave birth to my son Nick. The doctor detected several markers that he might have Down syndrome.  The next day, a hospital social worker handed me two brochures about Down syndrome. That is was what I had to work off of.

Here are the facts about Down syndrome courtesy of The National Down Syndrome Society, www.ndss.org:

  • Down syndrome occurs when an individual has a full or partial extra copy of chromosome 21. This additional genetic material alters the course of development and causes the characteristics associated with Down syndrome.
  • There are three types of Down syndrome: trisomy 21 (nondisjunction) accounts for 95 percent of cases, translocation accounts for about 4 percent and mosaicism accounts for about 1 percent.
  • Down syndrome is the most commonly occurring chromosomal condition. One in every 691 babies in the United States is born with Down syndrome.
  • There are more than 400,000 people living with Down syndrome in the United States.
  • Down syndrome occurs in people of all races and economic levels.
  • The incidence of births of children with Down syndrome increases with the age of the mother. But due to higher fertility rates in younger women, 80 percent of children with Down syndrome are born to women younger than 35.
  • People with Down syndrome have an increased risk for certain medical conditions such as congenital heart defects, respiratory and hearing problems, Alzheimer’s disease, childhood leukemia and thyroid conditions. Many of these conditions are now treatable, so most people with Down syndrome lead healthy lives.
  • A few of the common physical traits of Down syndrome are low muscle tone, small stature, an upward slant to the eyes and a single deep crease across the center of the palm. Every person with Down syndrome is a unique individual and may possess these characteristics to different degrees or not at all.
  • Life expectancy for people with Down syndrome has increased dramatically in recent decades — from 25 years old in 1983 to 60 years old today.
  • People with Down syndrome attend school, work and participate in decisions that affect them, and contribute to society in many wonderful ways.
  • All people with Down syndrome experience cognitive delays, but the effect is usually mild to moderate and is not indicative of the many strengths and talents that each individual possesses.
  • Quality educational programs, a stimulating home environment, good health care and positive support from family, friends and the community enable people with Down syndrome to develop their full potential and lead fulfilling lives.

I think back on that 33-year-old mom who was unsure of her future. What advice would I give her today?

Down syndrome journey

First, I would say that everything is going to be OK. The path will be different and move slower. But your child will work through the low muscle tone with the help of early intervention programs. The benchmarks like sitting up, crawling, walking and eating solid food will take longer to reach. Try to be patient and rest assured that your child will hit them.

Nick, age one….

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The next thing I would tell her is that there will be angels that light a path along the way. Embrace them and incorporate what you learn at home. The speech therapists will teach him how to blow bubbles, work on lip closure, feeding and to use sign language along with songs to communicate. The occupational and physical therapists will guide him in fine and gross motor skills. The teachers will hold the lantern and illuminate his mind. The social support groups will be your shoulders to lean on.

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Finally, I would share this message. Your baby was born with Down syndrome, but they are a person first. People with Down syndrome experience the same emotions that you and I do. Your life will change for the better as you savor the sweet victories. They will steal your heart and touch others in ways you can’t imagine. Your child will bring a unique perspective of seeing the best of the human spirit.

Nick in Sox hat

This is my advice to the young mother who just gave birth to a beautiful baby, who just happens to have Down syndrome. That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Posted in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC), Autism, Down syndrome, Speech and Occupational Therapy

Blog #123~UFC Rousey & Apraxia of Speech

Blog #123~UFC Rousey & Apraxia of Speech

Headline in ABC News last week, Ronda Rousey UFC champion fighter brings awareness to Apraxia of Speech! Take a look at the story featured on Good Morning America:

The lives of champion UFC fighter Ronda Rousey and speech pathologist and mom Laura Smith might seem worlds apart, but the two women share a unique connection.

Smith and her 5-year-old daughter, Ashlynn, met Rousey, 28, this spring at a book signing in Denver, Colorado, for Rousey’s autobiography, “My Fight/Your Fight.”

Smith told ABC News she was on a mission to meet Rousey in order to find out if the speech disorder she had as a child was the same condition that affected her daughter, Ashlynn, has.  

“I read probably everything she’s ever said about her speech impediment and the more I read I was like, ‘That was apraxia. This is apraxia,’” Smith recalled.

Childhood apraxia of speech is a motor speech disorder where the brain has problems coordinating with the body parts –- like lips, jaw and tongue -– needed for speech, according to the American Speech-Language Hearing Association.

“At first I was tested for deafness,” Rousey said of her own childhood struggle. “They thought maybe my pronunciation was off because I was hearing things differently.”  

“But it was really I had all these words perfectly arranged in my head, it’s just when they tried to come out of my mouth they sounded different,” she said. “It was kind of like there was a divide between my brain and my mouth.”  

Because apraxia was not a common diagnosis when Rousey was a child, no one suspected it was what was behind the fighter’s speech problems. That is, until Smith gave Rousey a brochure on apraxia at the book signing.  

“I threw the brochure and the bodyguards came in immediately to get it,” Smith said. “She [Rousey] picked it up and I was like, ‘If you did have it, would you say it in your interviews because it would mean so much for our kids.’”

Rousey says the information in the brochure struck her instantly.  

“I actually ended up reading through the whole thing that night and was like, ‘Oh my God, this is all exactly it. This is exactly what it was,’” Rousey said. “I didn’t know it was actually apraxia until that moment.”  

“She really taught me a lot about myself that day and I can’t thank her enough for it,” Rousey said of Smith.  

To thank Smith and her daughter, Rousey sent a special message, doing exactly what Smith asked her to do at the book signing, talking about apraxia.

“Hi Laura and Ashlynn,” Rousey said in the taped message. “I just wanted to say I’m so happy to hear everything that you’re doing to raise awareness of apraxia.”

“You definitely raised awareness in me and I just wish you all the best,” she said. “I know our paths will cross again someday at some point so I can’t wait to see you again.”

Ronda Rousey ABC news

So just what does apraxia look like?   The American Speech–Language–Hearing Association, describes childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) “is a motor speech disorder. Children with CAS have problems saying sounds, syllables, and words. This is not because of muscle weakness or paralysis. The brain has problems planning to move the body parts (e.g., lips, jaw, tongue) needed for speech. The messages from the brain to the mouth are disrupted, and the person cannot move his or her lips or tongue to the right place to say sounds correctly, even though the muscles are not weak.”

This hits home for me. My son Nick who is 21 years old and has Down syndrome and autism was given the diagnosis of apraxia when he was 6 years old. While his language skills have improved with speech therapy, he still struggles with articulating words. When he tries to imitate some words he gets stuck.  Nick continues to go to speech therapy, uses sign language, a picture exchange communication system (PECS) and has an AAC device with an app called Touch Chat to further facilitate his communication.

For more information including symptoms, causes, testing and treatment click on the on these links:

http://www.webmd.com/brain/apraxia-symptoms-causes-tests-treatments?page=3

http://www.apraxia-kids.org/

http://www.speakingofapraxia.com/  The first ever parent guide to childhood apraxia of speech, written by Leslie Lindsay

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The meeting of Smith and Rousey at the book signing resulted in raising awareness of apraxia. Rousey posted the brochure on her Facebook page, which has been liked by nearly 7 million as of last week.

ronda-rousey-book

Here’s to Rousey who has won many fights in her life both in and outside the ring.  She has no doubt given inspiration to kids and their parents around the world. I hope this information helps parents and children who are struggling with speech difficulties. That’s what’s in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Speech and Occupational Therapy

Blog #121~10 Years of Autism

Blog #121~ 10 Years of Autism

Last Saturday, the Chicago White Sox gave a replica of the 2005 World Series Ring to all the fans. This was to commemorate the 10 year anniversary of the Sox winning the World Series.

This sure beats the heck out of any bobble head they’ve given out…

White Sox Ring

I slipped the heavy ring on, that Al brought home from the game. I thought back on the week that the White Sox won the American League Championship securing their spot in the World Series. That was the week, that we got the firm diagnosis that our son Nick, had autism. Nick is now 21 years old and has Down syndrome along with autism. A lot has happened in the last 10 years, and I’ve learned plenty in the process.

Sox  Nick and mom

What about the 11 years prior to the diagnosis of Nick having autism? Well, when he was 5 years old we had him tested but it was found that he was not on the autism spectrum because he was highly social and the oddities were due to having Sensory Integration Dysfunction.

According to the Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation (SPD Foundation), “Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD, formerly known as “sensory integration dysfunction”)

is a condition that exists when sensory signals don’t get organized into appropriate responses. Pioneering occupational therapist and neuroscientist A. Jean Ayres, PhD, likened SPD to a neurological “traffic jam” that prevents certain parts of the brain from receiving the information needed to interpret sensory information correctly. A person with SPD finds it difficult to process and act upon information received through the senses, which creates challenges in performing countless everyday tasks.”

Nick sought out input by tapping objects, walking heavily and stimming with his toys to help organize his senses. His occupational therapist worked with him weekly providing him with a sensory diet.

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In addition, Nick also has Verbal Apraxia of Speech (an acquired oral motor speech disorder affecting an individual’s ability to translate conscious speech plans into motor plans, which results in limited and difficult speech ability). The sensory and speech conditions blurred the lines, therefore the autism didn’t come to view at the time.

As Nick entered the throes of puberty, it became evident that there was more to his behaviors than just Down syndrome. That’s when we sought out Little Friends Center for Autism to do an assessment 10 years ago. Looking back I had a hunch he did. However, part of me wasn’t ready to face such a daunting diagnosis as autism. We got the report from Little Friends the day that the White Sox won the ALC championship. That report was the key to opening up a new world for us.

The official diagnosis of autism, allowed us to request more specific services for Nick. This included a better communication system, behavior plan, training, finding the NADS (National Association for Down Syndrome) support group for dual diagnosis families, and respite care through the state. With the help of Little Friends, I attended training sessions to help Nick foster independence and better communication. More importantly, I learned how to get my son toilet trained once and for all, and out of those Depends diapers.

Nick has grown a lot in the last 10 years. Things are not near perfect, nor will they ever be. We face our daily  battles. He is still stimming and raising autism awareness everywhere he goes. But the meltdowns are fewer and far between. Nick is happy and a funny guy. And when I see him standing there in his boxer briefs I am reminded of perhaps the greatest accomplishments in my life. I’m proud to say that we are done with what our autism community refers to as “Code Brown”

No more poop smears!

poop icon

If you are a parent and have a hunch that your child may have autism, this is my wish for you. That you go get an assessment, take that piece of paper and use it as your ticket to get the services to help your child.  Seeing where Nick is today is a sweet victory that I savor.  It feels like I’m winning the series in Nick’s world.  That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa 🙂

Posted in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC), Autism, Down syndrome, Speech and Occupational Therapy

Blog #116~A New Talker for Nick

 

Blog #116~ A New Talker for Nick

Nick has a new talker!  The SETT meeting team looked at Nick’s needs as a student along with his environment, tasks he does and what tools would be needed to help him effectively communicate. Nick is using an iPad with the Touch Chat program.  This Augmentative and Alternative Communication device (AAC), is bigger and the buttons are much easier to push.  It has more keys on the home page making it easier for him to navigate.  Each team member went through a training orientation on the device to learn how to sift through the keyboard and customize it to suit Nick’s particular needs.  Nick is 21 years old and has Down syndrome and autism.

Nick’s new AAC Device….

ipad touch chat

Nick’s speech therapist introduced the device at school.  He was very excited along with his peers during group.  The first thing they did was to take a “selfie” of Nick (and he pressed the button) to add his photo to the personal page.  This page also includes his age, the town he lives in and that he has a cat named Kibbie and assisted in getting Nick to “buy in”.

Kibbie 🙂

Kibbie

At home, Nick navigated through the keyboard very well.  Here are some of the requests and comments he made:

*Nick pushed pulled out juice box and requested juice on talker

*Nick pushed “baseball” and walked to cabinet where they were pointing (wanting his can of tennis balls)

*Nick pushed “tired” before laid down for a nap

*Nick pushed “salami and cheese”, after nap and then pushed “soda”

*Nick pushed “salad” “mashed potatoes” as he unloaded dishwasher

*Nick pushed “phone” after his dad got off the phone to his parents and pushed Grandpa/Grandma

*Nick pushed “bathroom, shave, shower” while waiting for dinner

*Nick pushed “dessert”-Cake after dinner

We are off to a good start with Nick using the AAC device.  The iAdapter case is pretty rugged, Nick’s already thrown it a few times (shocker right).  However the stand that props it up has broken after taking a few hits. When he is in a throwing mood, I tuck the device out of sight so it won’t be damaged further. One thing I noticed right away was how territorial he was with it. He also found his way through the keyboard better than I thought he would.  At one point he pushed the category called “Groups”.  Then, he hit “Jobs” and found the “Firefighter” button which he hit a dozen times.  You can view a video of this on the Facebook page: Down Syndrome with a Slice of Autism.  By the way, why is there a “Pirate” is a button in the “jobs” category?  🙂

Nick fell asleep with it on the couch the first night….

Nick touch chat

Stay tuned for more about Nick’s communication device.  That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

 

Posted in Speech and Occupational Therapy, Uncategorized

Update~ Mr. Sneeze in Your Face

Update~ Mr. Sneeze in Your Face

sneeze cover up

Mr. Sneeze in Your Face passed along his cold to me which is kicking my butt.  Nick knows how to sneeze in his arm.  I saw him practicing it in front of the bathroom mirror the other day.  He just thinks it’s funny to give you a direct hit.

Needless to say, I am under the weather, thanks Nick. Down syndrome and autism has its challenges.  This weekend was a struggle, I’ll leave it at that.  I was planning on writing about the recent re-evaluation we did on Nick’s speech device.  I’ll save that for next time when my head is clear.

This re- blog will be a nice tee up, and provides a background of Nick’s speech and methods we’ve used for his communication over the years @ https://nickspecialneeds.wordpress.com/2013/03/11/blog-45can-we-talk/

Hope you are all surviving this cold season and frigid winter. I’m doing shots of Emergen-C and Echinacea tea hoping to turn the corner soon.  After all, I’ve got to keep up with Nick!   Thank you for reading and sharing Nick’s world.  That’s what is in my foggy noggin this week.

~Teresa

Posted in Down syndrome, Physical Therapy and Special Needs, Speech and Occupational Therapy

My Guest Blog~So Your Baby Has Down Syndrome

My Guest Blog~ So Your Baby Has Down Syndrome

Recently I was contacted by an associate editor at Social Work License Map, a guide to social work licensure that clarifies the steps needed to become a social worker in any state.  This social work site,  also focuses on specific social work advocacy. I am very excited to share that my website, “Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism” will be included here.  In addition, I did a guest blog spot which posted live last week.  The guest blog is entitled, “So Your Baby Has Down Syndrome.”  Just click below to view:

http://socialworklicensemap.com/guest-blog-so-your-baby-has-down-syndrome/

October is  Down syndrome Awareness Month and there are so many good stories in the news.  I will continue to post these on the Facebook page for you to enjoy.  Thank you for reading and sharing Nick’s world.  That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa 🙂

DSAwarenessMagnet

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Speech and Occupational Therapy

Re-Blog~One of My Favorites

Re-Post~ One of My Favorite Blogs

No school today, it’s “Building Articulation Day” (whatever that is).  I was going to try and write but Nick is on a mission to drive me bonkers this morning.  So I decided to re-post one of my favorite blogs.  You will get a real sense of Nick’s world living with Down syndrome and autism.

Here’s a hint 🙂 ………. Splat!

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That wasn’t part of the recipe, Nick…….. Poor Woody

 

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Now that I have your curiosity, see what else Nick has done and what we do about it @https://nickspecialneeds.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/blog-3-getting-your-goat/

Hope you enjoyed Nick’s world, the rest of us are just trying to keep up. That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Physical Therapy and Special Needs, Speech and Occupational Therapy

Blog #100~20 Tidbits about Nick

Blog #100~ 20 Tidbits about Nick

To celebrate the 100 milestone of this blog “Down Syndrome with a Slice of Autism,” I made a list of 20 things about my son Nick.

Nick 20 years ago, what a little kewpie doll…..

Nick baby

1. Nick was born the day after his Dad’s birthday.

2. Nick was in ICU and on oxygen for one week due to an AV valve in his heart not closing. He was released from the hospital on Valentine’s Day which was also Ash Wednesday.

3. Nick started early intervention with speech, occupational and physical therapy at 8 weeks old. They taught him sign language. He worked on a stability ball to build core strength long before it became trendy.

4. Nick was the youngest child to start horseback riding therapy in the early intervention program at age one.

5. We use to prop up pillows on the sides of his high chair to keep him from flopping over to the side.

Nick high chair

6. Due to his low muscle tone (a trait of Down syndrome) he didn’t walk or eat solid foods until he was 3 ½ years old.

7. Nick doesn’t like yogurt or applesauce because I’d mix this awful smelling and tasting Nutrivene Vitamin Supplement into them.

8. To get Nick to pull up to stand, his brother would bounce ping pong balls on the coffee table to catch his attention. I also hung several music toys over the fireplace so he had to pull up to his feet to hear the music. (Hmmmm, maybe that’s why he’s obsessed with pushing buttons.) 🙂

9. Nick has been to the top of the Eiffel Tower and Notre Dame Cathedral.

Nick Eiffel Tower

10. He has been overseas three times including London, France and Spain.

11. Nick can replicate exact sneezes.

12. He is so flexible that he can sleep with his legs crossed and folded all the way forward.

13. Nick’s a thrill seeker and will sign “more” as soon as a roller coaster ride is over.

14. He hates to wear hat and gloves no matter how cold it is.

Nick sled

15. Nick’s favorite actor is Eddie Murphy, followed by Will Farrell and Adam Sandler.

16. He doesn’t like any fruit at all (except raspberries, that is giving and getting them).

raspberry

17. He won a gold medal in the softball throw event at the Illinois State Special Olympics.

Nick Special Olympics

18. Nick was tested for autism at age 5 but didn’t get a formal diagnosis until he was 11 years old.

19. Nick has a thing for dolphins and beluga whales.

Nick Kiss

20. Before the 30 fire alarm pulls, Nick would grab car remote keys and set the alarms off.

Hope you enjoyed the 20 snippets about Nick.  Preview for next week, Blog #101~ A list of really cool things about Nick by several of his teachers. Thank you so much for reading and sharing Nick’s world for the last 100 blogs.   That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

20 Year Old Nick…..

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Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Speech and Occupational Therapy

Blog #83~Sensory Anchors

Blog #83~Sensory Anchors

Nick doesn’t play with toys like most kids do. Having Down syndrome and autism has changed the playing field for him.  He tends to use many of them to seek out some sensory benefit.  For instance, he likes to mound his toys up in one spot…..

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Even more fun was piling them on our cat……

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The other day he was stacking random objects here and there around the house.

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Why do kids with autism, Down syndrome and other sensory related issues  play with objects in such different ways?

sensory anchor one

There are many sensory issues associated with having autism.  Their world may get too bombarded with stimulus or feel unpredictable and overwhelming.  Finding a way to stay grounded becomes even more of a need when the senses are flooded with too much stimuli.  Often a child with sensory issues seeks out comfort in the form of a “sensory anchor” which helps them calm down.  These sensory anchors can be a repetitive activity that provides comfort and is soothing for them

Here are some examples of sensory anchors: 

*Lining up toys

*Spinning objects

*Following a line with their eyes

*Sitting in bean bag chair or swinging

*Looking at reflective objects

*Hand flapping

*Rocking back and forth

*Rubbing hands together

*Chewing on sleeves or collar of shirts and other non-food objects

*Smelling things

*Making repetitive sounds with mouth

How many of you have been out in public and notice a person with autism making odd sounds, rocking, or maybe banging on something loudly. These are ways in which they are  trying to cope in the world by using sensory anchors.  Nick’s include a variety of activities. He often chews on his sleeves and collar of his shirt.  Other times he is rocking, hand flapping, and tapping or making sounds with his mouth (that by the way sounds like a cow mooing)  🙂 

Nick’s first choice and all-time favorite is tapping a can of tennis balls against his mouth!

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Second choice, doing heavy work vacuuming!

Nick vacumming_Tabor Hills (3)

I realize that some of these are not acceptable in public, so I try to find alternatives for such occasions. For instance, I will provide deep pressure in the form of hugging to help calm him down.  But around the house and in the car, I have to respect his need to do this to help him self-regulate.   After all, everyone has some way of doing this whether it’s nail biting, twisting your hair, chewing on a pen, sitting while one leg is fidgeting to stay alert.  We all find our own way to decompress after a hectic day, right?  What’s your sensory anchor?  Music, meditation, exercise, hit the hunting or driving range, X-Box, a bubble bath or glass of wine?

zen

Bottom line, it’s important to provide opportunities for a child with autism and sensory integration issues to get grounded and centered.  So if it’s a can of tennis balls, then so be it!  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa