Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #222~Dear Doctor,A Down Syndrome Diagnosis is a Hope Story

Blog #222~Dear Doctor, A Down Syndrome Diagnosis, is a Hope Story

What is the right way for a doctor to deliver the news that your baby has Down syndrome either pre-natal or at birth?  Over the weekend, I received a link from Nothing Down, called Dear Doctor http://www.nothingdown.org/ The short film link, interviewed parents who shared their experiences with their doctor.  The delivery of the news of a Down syndrome diagnosis was often cold, stoic, and grim.  In some cases, the doctors told the parents what their child couldn’t do, while others were offered the option to terminate the pregnancy.  So how should a doctor deliver the news to parents that their baby has Down syndrome? Educating medical professionals, communities, and advocating for inclusion and acceptance, are some of the goals during the month of October, which is Down Syndrome Awareness Month.  The more you understand Down syndrome, the less fear you will have about the navigating the challenges associated with the diagnosis.

DS-Awareness-Month

I’m excited to share a new program that is going to change the way many medical professionals will deliver a pre-natal or birth diagnosis of Down syndrome.  It’s called Hope Story!

Hope Story’s Mission:

“Hope Story exists to give support, encouragement and hope to parents whose child have received a Down syndrome diagnosis; to provide free resources to the medical community to help them deliver a Down syndrome diagnosis, and to find ways for parents of children born with Down syndrome to use their unique story to bring hope to others.”  

Hope Story Helps 3 Main Groups:

*Parents whose child received  a diagnosis of Down syndrome.

*Parents who have a child with a diagnosis of Down syndrome.

*Medical Professionals

Hope Story will be providing kits to advocates who will partner with medical professionals.  Hope Advocates will inform, educate and allow doctors to get to know someone with Down syndrome on a personal level.  Tools in the Hope kit contain valuable information on how to deliver a diagnosis of Down syndrome, and a preferred language guide to help talk about Down syndrome with dignity, respect and hope.  In addition, the Hope booklet addresses concerns a new parent may have about Down syndrome.  Other tools include welcome letters, announcements, business card and  training videos for Hope advocates.

For more information on Hope Story click here:   @https://hopestory.org/about/

I’m looking forward to being an advocate for Hope Story, and the opportunity to work with medical professionals on delivering a positive pre-natal or birth diagnosis of Down syndrome.  Giving hope to other families who have a child with Down syndrome, has been the fuel for my writing for many years.   One thing I wish someone would have told me 24 years ago, when my son, Nick was born is this:

DD are like comas

Babies and children with Down syndrome have to work harder with physical, occupational and speech therapy to hit developmental milestones, and yes it may take longer, but they will and it hit them, and it will be grand!

My son Nick, age 24 🙂

Nick Key West

As we close to the end of October and Down Syndrome Awareness Month, I feel optimistic about the future of  individuals with Down syndrome.  We are moving beyond awareness, to acceptance and inclusion in society.  The future looks much brighter, with more opportunities for individuals with Down syndrome.  I’ve highlighted many success stories all month in my blogs, and social media listed below.  Education and understanding about Down syndrome is the key, and Hope Story is taking charge to help medical professionals and parents.  When you have knowledge and hope, the fear subsides.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick and view more about Hope Story and the Dear Doctor film on social media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Education and Special Needs, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #221~Inclusion in a General Education Classroom for Students with Down Syndrome

Blog #221~Inclusion in a General Education Classroom for Students with Down Syndrome

Down syndrome awareness ribbon

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month.  An individual with Down syndrome can be included in a general education classroom with the right support, accommodations and curriculum modifications.  This requires collaboration with the school team and understanding the needs of the student.  Inclusion education happens when children with and without disabilities participate and learn together in the same classes.  How can you advocate for an inclusive education environment for a student having Down syndrome?

*Inclusion in a general education classroom starts with a school team who is aware and understands what the experience can look like.  If the school does not support inclusion, the parent (and bringing an advocate on board) can help to educate the staff.  There is no one size fits all on inclusion, as each student is individual and unique in their needs. Inclusion is not a place, but rather an experience. Finding the right teachers, who are willing to set an open environment in the general education classroom is also a key ingredient to the success of inclusion.

Here are some examples of how inclusion can work:

http://www.friendshipcircle.org/blog/2014/02/05/10-examples-of-inclusion-for-those-who-need-to-se

Educate your school and community by hosting a screening for Inclusive Schools Week.  “Inclusive Schools Week is a proud partner with INTELLIGENT LIVES, the groundbreaking new documentary by Dan Habib. Narrated by Academy-award winning actor Chris Cooper, the film stars three pioneering young adults with intellectual disabilities – Micah, Naieer, and Naomie – who challenge perceptions of intelligence as they navigate high school, college, and the workforce. The film can now be screened in every community across the USA – host your own screening for Inclusive Schools Week! Intelligent Lives can help you advocate for change, raise funds for your organization, and open doors to inclusive education and employment for people of ALL abilities.” Go to http://www.intelligentlives.org to watch the film trailer and to learn how to host a screening in your communitye-it-to-believe-it/

Watch the trailer:  https://intelligentlives.org/trailer

*Create a one page profile sheet of your child to share with the school team and class.  There are many great ideas on Pinterest to create this.  

Here are some suggestions with examples on what to include:

-Picture of student

-Strengths (counting, matching, visual learner, receptive language, funny, wants to work)

-What works for student (visual schedule, patience, positive reinforcement, reminders before transitions)

-What doesn’t work for the student (sudden changes in schedule, taking something away, saying no or talking to firmly)

-What the student enjoys (music, making friends, Starfall computer game, dancing)

What the student needs (checklists, visual schedules, motor breaks, sensory break area, etc.)

*Inclusion works best with a solid Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and when the student is supported with a classroom aide/paraprofessional.  

Nick work aid

*Inclusion works best when the IEP includes all needed accommodations and modifications in the curriculum.  Accommodations are the tools needed for the student to succeed in the classroom.  Some examples might include a special pencil grip, nubby seat cushion, visual timer, calculator, built in motor breaks, communication device or picture exchange system (PECS) book.  Modifications to the curriculum allow the student to learn the grade level material , but simplified.  This helps the student learn at their own level what is most meaningful for them.  Goals in the IEP should be driven to promote further education, independence and future employment skills.

Here are two books that I recommend for learning more about how inclusion works for individuals with Down syndrome:

Inclusion in ActionWho's The Slow Learner

As I mentioned in last week’s blog post, Woodbine House also has many books about teaching reading and math skills for individuals with Down syndrome.  This month Woodbine House is offering a 30% discount on these books:

Click here to view the selections https://www.woodbinehouse.com/

Inclusion in a general education classroom can work for individuals with Down syndrome.  It benefits all students, and promotes a since of community and acceptance, that individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities desire.  With the right attitude, support, accommodations and modifications, inclusion in a regular classroom setting can be a rewarding and successful experience for individuals with Down syndrome, their peers and the school staff.

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow my son Nick who is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram @nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #220~Down Syndrome Good Reads

Blog #220~Down Syndrome Good Reads

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month.  This week, I want to highlight books associated with Down syndrome.  You can click on my resource book shelf page, to view a comprehensive list of books:  https://nickspecialneeds.com/resource-book-shelf/

Woodbine House is the gold standard for resource books related to Down syndrome and other intellectual and developmental disabilities for parents, family members, children, teachers, and other professionals.  This publishing company has over 40 books on Down syndrome with a  30% discount this month! http://www.woodbinehouse.com/product-category/down-syndrome/

Woodbine House Sale

There are a lot more books on Amazon, related to Down syndrome.  One that caught my eye, with a 5 star rating and solid reviews is The Parent’s Guide To Down Syndrome by Jen Jacob and Madra Sikora.  The reviews for this book state that it is upbeat, current, informative, insightful, and a fun and easy read:

parents guide to DS book

https://www.amazon.com/Parents-Guide-Down-Syndrome-Information/dp/144059290X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1539620279&sr=8-1&keywords=The+parents+guide+to+Down+syndrome

In addition to books for parents, teachers and professionals, there are many children’s books about Down syndrome both on Amazon and in my resource book shelf link, that I listed above.

 

Promoting acceptance and inclusion are two goals of Down syndrome Awareness Month.  Many parents and advocates do presentations at schools and in their community, incorporating book reads and power point presentations to educate others.

Donating books to local public and school libraries is a great way to spread the word about Down syndrome.  Many Down syndrome support groups provide materials, like bookmarks and calendars, that can be distributed as well.  In addition, these support groups often provide training to become a speaker and advocate.  Check with your local support group to see if they have a resource libray with books, tech and other resources to help families who have a child with Down syndrome.

Gifts book cover

The books and links I provided here, will help parents, family members, teachers and professionals better support a child having Down syndrome.  In particular, the Woodbine House books provided me with encouragement, understanding and practical tips for growth/medical management, academic skills in reading/math, gross and fine motor development.  This gave me more confidence to better advocate and help my son, Nick who is now 24 years old.

I hope these good reads provide a lens on the subject of Down syndrome to further educate, and promote acceptance and inclusion.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram @nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Doctors and Dentists, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Feeding, Personal Hygiene, Toileting, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #214~ How to Make a Social Story

Blog #214~How to Make a Social Story

A social story is a visual support that helps individuals understand new events, and reinforces a desired skill, task, or behavior.  They are useful for individuals that have Down syndrome, autism or other intellectual/developmental disabilities.  My son, Nick is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  Over the years, we’ve used social stories to help him navigate new situations like starting back to school, doctors and dentist appointments, vacations, and independent living skills such as showering and brushing teeth.  Social stories provide a blueprint as to what will occur and what is expected from a behavior standpoint.  Knowing what will happen and what’s expected, will also help to reduce anxiety.

social-stories go to class

As you can see from the illustration above, a social story should use succinct wording and may include visual, depending on the ability and age of the child.  Individuals with autism often understand better with pictures.  Support teachers and speech therapists are great resources for creating social stories for your child.  Google Images and Pinterest both offer many social stories to help you get started.

How to Make a Social Story:

1. Choose a specific event (starting school, a doctor visit, hygiene routine).

2. Break the story down into steps, including who, what, (and why depending on the child’s cognition level).  Use the pronouns “I” or “we”.

3. State the desired behaviors that you want the person reading the story to do for each step.

4. Include visuals either on-line or actual pictures of the setting.

5. Show the desired outcome, this may include a reward or verbal praise like “good job”.

6. Read the story together with the child repeatedly for several weeks before the event or new routine occurs.

hand_washing_routine

social story morning routine

Some individuals may respond better to video modeling.  Making a video of the desired task or behavior can help a child learn a new routine, adjust to a new environment or learn a skill.  As with social stories, the script should be simple in wording and broken down step by step.

Both social stories and video based modeling can help teach new skills, venues and routines.

Here are a few more ideas for using social stories or video modeling to teach your child:

*New job skill

*Fine motor tasks (cutting food, buttoning a shirt, pouring milk, handwriting)

*Gross motor skills (swimming strokes, riding a bike, yoga, sports)

*Grooming and hygiene routines (brush teeth, shower, toileting, dressing)

*Morning, afternoon and bedtime routines

*Household chores

*School Routines ( new school, picture day, assemblies, new curriculum in PE)

*Visits to doctor, dentist, blood draws, haircuts

*Community trips, vacations and special events

*Teaching social skills (playing games with peers, turn taking)

When you know what is going to occur, you feel less anxious.  Fear can lead to avoidance for all of us.  Utilizing social stories can help guide a child to understand what will happen, where and what is expected of their behavior.  It’s a great visual tool for teaching new skills and routines.  As the new school year begins, create a social story that includes actual pictures of the school building, classroom, lunchroom, gym and any other areas your child will be in.  Social stories will help to guide your child to smooth and successful experiences both at home, school and in the community.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram @nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #209~The Big 5-0 Fire Alarm Pull

Blog #209~The Big 5-0 Fire Alarm Pull

Well this happened over the weekend in St. Louis, Nick pulled his 50th fire alarm at a wedding reception.  The Unnerstall’s are a big family and like to celebrate in a grand way.  The venue was the Chase Park Plaza Hotel in St. Louis.  The cocktail hour was just wrapping up, as the procession began to move into the dining area, that’s when it happened.

firelite-pull-station

The fire alarm was tucked behind a curtain and only partially exposed.  That’s all it takes for Nick.  My eyes momentarily diverted to the photo booth area, just to the right of the curtain.  That’s when Nick made a run for it.  I dashed over in my 3 inch high heels, and grabbed his hand just as it grazed the alarm.  He got me, after an 8 year run with a clean record.  As his middle school teacher Jess told me once, “He’s cheetah fast!”

cheetah

Two young men in their twenties busted out laughing, one saying, “Man, I always wanted to do that.”  In the moment, I was not laughing.  But admittedly, it’s hard not to chuckle at the absurd number of pulls Nick has done since third grade.  We got someone to alert the hotel desk, that it was a false alarm.  Fortunately, they didn’t evacuate the building during that stormy evening.  We walked into the dining area as the lights flashed and the sirens blared loud for well over 5 minutes before they shut off.

I should add here that in Nick’s behavior plan, it calls to remove him from the building giving no reinforcement or reacting to his actions.  This reduces him from getting the rush he seeks from the loud sirens and lights flashing.  However, the venue was in the middle of downtown St. Louis with busy streets, being on the upper floor of the hotel, and stormy weather didn’t make it feasible to do so.  Visuals are used as well, these support a person who has autism.  He also has a social story that we review, however that seems to be ineffective.  Compliance commands are another tool we utilize.  If a directive has too many words, it may be too complicated for an individual with autism.  Thus, the individual may not be able to process the information.  Using compliance commands with fewer and concise directives help them to stay on task.  In the case of walking down a corridor, we use these two directives, “Big guys keep on walking” and “Hands to self, Nick”.  These compliance commands do help Nick to stay focused and remain on task.  Nick is then given praise and positive reinforcement for making good choices.

Nick is quite pleased at himself for adding to the wedding reception festivities, me not so much 😮 

Nick at Kurt Wedding

So how did this all begin?  Some individuals with autism are sensitive to over stimulation from a sensory standpoint.  Nick tends to actively seek out more sensory stimulation on a daily basis.  It all started innocently with car remotes keys.  Nick realized at an early age that if you push the red panic button, it sets off the car alarm and the headlights will flash.  He once took the key remote out of a babysitter’s purse, and proceeded to walk up to the front door, point it at her car and set off the alarm.  By third grade, he discovered fire alarms at his elementary school.  In a matter of 2 days he set the alarm off 3 times.  We’ve noticed a pattern over the years, that the alarm pulls tend to come in three’s.  Just last week, he set off an alarm at his day program when a staff member was tending to another client.  She thought Nick would remain on the swing in the gym.  But that’s when Nick strikes, just when you divert your attention, even for a second.

The first time Nick got me was leaving the doctor’s office, as I fumbled in my purse to get the car keys.  Another time, while I was wearing a clunky therapy boot, he let go of the grocery cart and darted to one at Dominicks 8 years ago.  His Dad “technically” has a clean record.  However, Nick nearly got one on Al, at Houston’s Bush International Airport where the alarms are painted silver.  Just recently, we attended Nick’s cousin’s graduation ceremony from Bowling Green State University.  Al took Nick to the restroom he came close.  Nick pulled up a cover which sets off a very loud mini alarm alert.

There’s been some good replies on social media, that have eased the sting of being the big 5-0, one being this, “I’m sorry but I just have to laugh.  I know that you probably don’t laugh when he does this, but the sign does say pull down.  So what else is he supposed to do?”  Another reply on Facebook, “Ever vigilant Nick!  He wanted to add to the excitement.”

Well, excitement is right, Nick sure did light up the wedding reception.  I guess if he’s going to pull #50 it should be in a big, fancy venue, surrounded by family.  Go big or go home, Nick!  This weekend is one for the memory book, and Nick gave the newly wedded couple a night they won’t forget.  As his tagline says, It’s Nick’s world, the rest of us are just trying to keep up.

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick on Social Media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #192~Down syndrome-Autism: Green Monday Gift Ideas

Blog #192~Down syndrome-Autism:Green Monday Gift Ideas

green-monday

It’s green Monday and just two weeks until Christmas.  Here are some gift ideas for individuals having Down syndrome (or a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism, or other special needs) along with their caregivers, teachers/aids, and therapists.

http://papercloudsapparel.com/  Order T-shirts, hats and totes designed by artists with special needs

My son Nick, wearing a Paper Clouds Apparel shirt designed by Justin Lundeen…

nick fire truck shirt

https://www.riverbendgalleries.com/  Features the beautiful photography of artist, Geoffrey Mikol prints, framed art, calendars, coaster sets and greeting cards are available for purchase online….

Geoffrey Mikol picture    Geoffrey Mikol

http://specialsparkle.com Kelly is a young entrepreneur who has Down syndrome.  She designs and makes fashionable jewelry you can order online….

special sparkle jewelry

http://www.christianroyalpottery.com/pages/about  Beautiful pottery (bowls, platters, plates, jewelry) by Christian Royal…..

 

 

One of the best gifts is an iPad and there are countless apps for learning and play.  If you are looking for a sturdy case, the Go Talk Rugged and Big Grip cases have held up the best…..  

 

If your child has sensory needs, and likes to do a lot of dropping, check out these toys:

vortx-dropping-coins  marble racemagic-tracks-mega-set-360-piece--A817AA38.zoom

Gifts ideas in located in the archives, type this in the search box: Blog #131~Christmas Ideas for a Child With Special Needs…..

 

Gift ideas for babies and toddlers with Down syndrome: http://www.cedarsstory.com/?s=Best+Gift+Ideas

Noah’s Dad- Down syndrome Awareness Top 10 gifts for a 7 year old: http://noahsdad.com/7-year-old-gift-ideas/

Books for caregivers and families, here are a few suggestions and there are more listed in this Blog #144~ Inspiring Books Related to Down syndrome located in the archives……

 

Gifts book cover    Book An Uncomplicated Life  down syndrome and autism intersect

Please feel free to share this, and any of my blogs with others and on social media.  Also, check out my Pinterest page for more gift recommendations and other helpful information. Do you have any gift suggestions? I’m always looking for unique gift ideas related to Down syndrome and autism to post on my website.  Nick and I wish you all the best as you are preparing to enjoy the holiday season.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick on Social Media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Autism Safety and Wandering, Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #168~ New Disability Identification Card

Blog #168~ New Disability Identification Card

This morning, I attended an event presented by Illinois State Representative, Stephanie Kifowit at the Aurora Police Department.   Last year, she sponsored legislation to create a disability awareness card.  Many individuals in our community live with special needs.  Often, their conditions can sometimes make it difficult to communicate in stressful situations.  This new disability wallet card was unveiled to foster better communication for individuals who struggle during these times.

State Representative Stephanie Kifowit….

FullSizeRender

This initiative was the idea of School Board President Lori Price, who is a parent of a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Persons with autism spectrum disorder and other disabilities may shut down, get nervous, panic or display inappropriate behaviors during high stress situations.  The disability awareness card is a tool, to help individuals quickly identify themselves to first responders and other public figures.   An individual can quickly show this wallet card, which will help to prevent a situation from escalating.

Face it, we all get nervous when being pulled over by a police officer.  Imagine what it must feel like for a person medically diagnosed with an intellectual, developmental or mental disability. This wallet card is different from the state ID card, as it contains the following…..

On this card, these conditions may present a person who:

*Appears deaf or unable to understand

*Has difficulty speaking or communicating

*Engages in repetitive or self-stimulating behaviors such as rocking or hand flapping.  

*Becomes agitated due to physical contact or stressful situations

*Acts indifferent or unresponsive

These conditions are stated on the card along with this statement:

“Please do not interpret my behavior as refusal to cooperate.  To better communicate with me, it can be helpful to speak slowly and clearly, repeat questions and allow time for responses.”

“If those techniques are unsuccessful, I request that you contact the person noted below on my behalf as he/she will confirm my diagnosis and provide information you may need about my identity or condition.”

These cards are free to individuals who have been approved by the Secretary of State’s office for an Illinois Person with a Disability ID card.  

For an application click here @https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com

I applaud State Representative Stephanie Kifowit for taking Lori Price’s idea for this simple card, that will improve communication and help de-escalate high stress situations.  This will assist law enforcement and first responders in keeping our loved ones safe.  Readers , please let me know if an identification card like this has been implemented, where you live.  If not, perhaps it’s time to champion this effort!

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Who’s getting funky on World Down Syndrome Day, 3/21?

Deadline for ordering your funky socks for World Down Syndrome Day is this Thursday.  Support our campaign to help The National Association for Down Syndrome and our local homeless shelter by ordering and rocking your socks on, 3/21!  Click here to order: https://my.wehelptwo.com/campaign?reset=1&id=373

Follow Nick:

Down Syndrome With A Slice of Autism on Facebook and Pinterest

#dsautism on Instagram

@tjunnerstall on Twitter

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs, Resources for Special Needs

Winter 2017 Update

Winter 2017 Update

I hesitate to call this a “winter” update, as we’ve been enjoying a string of mild, 65 degree days here in the Chicago area.

Hot tub in February, no jacket required…..

nick-hot-tub-feb

My son Nick, just celebrated his 23rd birthday a few weeks ago.  He has Down syndrome and autism.  He has been going to an adult day program, for the past year.  The program offers a variety of enriching activities, which he completely enjoys.  In addition, Nick does many community outings with his awesome respite caregivers, Jodi and Lara.  They go out to eat at a variety of restaurants, to the movies, library, and parks.  Nick loves being out and about, in the community.

We have been very active in our local Down syndrome support group, The National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS).  Even before we relocated to the Chicago area, NADS was instrumental in providing information and support for us.  They have been a vital resource for our family, and many others in the Chicagoland area.  To find our more information about The National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS), click here: http://www.nads.org.

nads-logo

The NADS Bowl-A-Thon event, is coming up on March 5th.  This event, is the single largest fundraiser for NADS.  This year, Nick has a fundraising page for his bowling team. You can click on the link to support Nick’s Elbow Bumpers Team and NADS:

http://www.firstgiving.com/fundraiser/nick-unnerstall/nads-32nd-annual-bowl-a-thon 

Big Guy’s signature elbow bump with his brother, Hank…..

nick-and-bro-x-mas

One more update, I want to briefly mention is coming up on March 21st, which is World Down Syndrome Day. 

world-down-syndrome-day

“World Down Syndrome Day is observed on March 21. On this day, people with Down syndrome and those who live and work with them throughout the world organize and participate in activities and events to raise public awareness and create a single global voice for advocating for the rights, inclusion and well-being of people with Down syndrome.”

One of the trademarks of World Down Syndrome Day, is rocking your socks!  This year I am working on partnership to raise money and awareness for Down syndrome, where you can purchase some funky socks.  I’ll be posting more information about this next week, on this site and the social media sites listed below. Stay tuned……

funky-socks

The Down syndrome community has supported Nick and our family, so much over the past 23 years.  These fundraising efforts are the least that we can do to give back, and help other families going down the same path. Having a community of support has helped us to navigate Nick’s world. Now at age 23, Nick is a very happy, young man who enjoys life.  That certainly brings a smile to my face. 🙂

nick-smiling

That’s what is in my noggin this week! 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism on Facebook and Pinterest

#nickdsautism on Instagram

@tjunnerstall on Twitter

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Education and Special Needs, Feeding, Personal Hygiene, Toileting, Parenting Special Needs, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #164~Why Use a Visual Schedule?

doctor-checkup

Blog #164~Why Use a Visual Schedule?

We all hate getting lost, it can be aggravating  and nervewracking. That’s why we use maps to help navigate our way.

mapquest

The same is true for a child with special needs who lacks verbal and cognitive skills.  Providing a visual schedule allows your child to see what is going to happen in their day. My son, Nick is 22 years old and has Down syndrome and autism. Visual schedules provide many benefits for him to travel smoothly, through his daily routine.

Nick fist bump AID

Benefits of Using a Visual Schedule:

*Provides structure and predictability by showing a child what is coming up next.  This greatly reduces anxiety and builds confidence.

*Helps with transitions from one activity to the next.

*Picture form is easier to understand than verbal instructions.  Children with autism often comprehend pictures and/or written directions easier than verbal cues alone.

*Helps to teach sequence of events especially when using words, “first”, “next”, and “last”.

*Expedites learning routines and fosters independence in self-help/hygiene skills and household/school jobs.

handwashing-routine

*Helps with time management and literacy development by reading through pictures and words associated with them.

*Improves conversation skills by giving a visual framework of what they did and what was their favorite part of the end of the day.

*Assists teachers and caregivers with routine changes, when things get out of sync.  It also helps to introduce a new and/or different activity.

dentist-checkup-visual

Visual schedules come in all shapes and forms and many are available in Google images.  You can adjust the length and type of images, (PECS-Picture Exchange System, photos, written words,  iPad/ smart phone apps) to what your child will most easily understand.

first-then-app

It’s best to start with a small routine and adapt the schedules based on your child’s needs and abilities. Try pairing a non-preferred activity (first) followed by a preferred choice (next).  Your child’s speech therapist can be of great help in creating picture sequences that would fit their needs.

Going through a visual schedule with your child, helps them understand what is going to happen, and what behavior you expect.

Here is one we use when going to the mall.  Note the visual below has going to the stores (first)  and Taco Bell (next) as the preferred activity.

IMG_3865

Sequence for going to church:

photo (106)

Full Day Schedule: ( Note, this could be broken up in separate pieces if this would be to overwhelming).

visual-schedule-for-a-day

Using visual schedules have been shown to be helpful for children and adults with special needs by giving them more control on what goes on in their daily lives.  It provides the road map to navigate for a smooth ride through their daily routines.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

@Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism on Facebook and Pinterest

#nickdsautism on Instagram

@tjunnerstall on Twitter

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Parenting Special Needs, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #147~A Father’s Perspective on Special Needs

Blog #147~A Father’s Perspective on Special Needs

Father’s Day is Sunday, June 19th!  As I did for Mother’s Day (Blog #144), this week features books written by fathers who have children with special needs.  My son Nick is 22 years old, he has Down syndrome and autism.  I am always searching for new information and gaining different perspectives.  If you are looking for a male/father perspective check out the book list below.  In addition, here are two dads that I recommend  following on Facebook.  Their websites are also included:

“Noah’s Dad” (Noah is 5 years old and has Down syndrome) http://www.noahsdad.com

“Autism Daddy” (Kyle aka “The King” is 12 years old and has severe autism and is nonverbal).  http://www.theautismdaddy.com. 

Books written by fathers who have children with special needs:

Austin, Paul: Beautiful Eyes: A Father Transformed (W.W. Norton, 2014).  A father reflects on his journey with his daughter with Down syndrome, beginning with her birth and ending with her life as a young adult living in a group home.

Daugerty, Paul: An Uncomplicated Life: A Father’s Memoir of His Exceptional Daughter (Harper Collins, 2015).  A father celebrates his daughter’s accomplishments, from childhood through college and impending marriage, and the joy she has brought to her family and those around her.

Book An Uncomplicated Life

Estreich, George:  The Shape of the Eye: Down Syndrome, Family and the Stories We Inherit (Southern Methodist University Press, 2011).  A poet reflects on the many influences of family after the birth of his daughter with Down syndrome.

Palmer, Greg: Adventures in the Mainstream: Coming of Age with Down Syndrome 2nd Edition (Bennett and Hastings Publishing, 2012).  Palmer’s memoir about his son’s transition from high school to the world of work, now updated with reflections on their family’s experiences since the original edition was first released.

Sagmiller, G.: Dakota’s Pride the Book: One Father’s Search for the Truth about Down Syndrome (The Gifted Learning Project, 2014). The book version of the documentary featuring questions and answers with professionals and parents of children with Down syndrome.

Taddei, S.R.: Room 47: Down Syndrome-A New Father’s Diary (Viera Press, 2012).  A father publishes reflections about his daughter with Down syndrome drawn from the journals he kept during her first year.

Thank you National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS) http://www.nads.org for the book list!

I hope these resources provide insight and inspiration from a father’s perspective. Cheers to you, Dads!  That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa

Nick and his Dad at Hawk’s Cay Resort….

Nick Kiss

Follow Nick:

Facebook @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

pintrest@Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

instagram-logo#nickdsautism