Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, IEP (Indivdualized Education Plan), Parenting Special Needs

Blog #204~ Lessons Learned from the Last Lecture

Blog #204~Lessons Learned from the Last Lecture

Randy Pausch was a professor at Carnegie Mellon and author of the national bestselling book, The Last Lecture.  He encouraged his students to attempt hard things and not worry about failing.  He would give out “The First Penguin Award” to the team who took the biggest gamble trying new ideas and technology, but failed to achieve their goals.  “This award celebrated out-of-the-box thinking and using imagination in a daring way.”  The title of this award came from the way that penguins jump into the water that might contain predators.  Somebody has to be the gustsy, first penguin, and take a bold leap into the unknown.

fail spectacularly

The takeaway is this, it’s important to attempt hard things and  you can expect to hit brick walls.  That is when you gain experience.

“Experience is what you get when you didn’t get what you wanted.”

This quote struck me as I was reading The Last Lecture over the weekend.  My son Nick, was born and diagnosed with Down syndrome.  Years later, he recieved a secondary diagnsosis of autism.  I didn’t get the “normal child” that I expected.  My path raising Nick has been very different then I had planned.  But along the way, over the past twenty-four years I’ve gained a great amount of experience in navigating my son’s journey.

Randy Pausch, a computer science professor gave his last lecture after receiving a diagnosis of terminal cancer, leaving behind a wife and three young children.  His book, The Last Lecture, co-written with Jeffrey Zaslow is a summation of everything Randy believed with some valuable lessons in “overcoming obstacles, enabling others, and seizing every moment.

There are so many lessons offered by Pausch in The Last Lecture.  I want to share a few that resonated with me, as a parent of a child with special needs.  When my son, Nick was born twenty-four years ago, I made some choices on how I was going to manage life.  I was dealt a set of cards, that I didn’t expect.  But soon realized, that I would have to play the hand differently.  This meant getting support to help my son reach developmental milestones and creating a home environment that supported his growth.  I also learned to reach out to parents, therapists and teachers with experience to help me understand how to help my son become the best he could be.

Randy Pausch cards dealt with

Another valuable lesson is in the approach to life when facing adversity.  Randy says, “Make a decision, are you going to be a Tigger or an Eeyore?”  A.A. Milne’s beloved Winnie-the Pooh characters are in two different camps.  I’d choose fun-loving Tigger over grumpy Eeyore every time.  Optimism can take you much further in life!

Randy-Pausch-Pooh-Quote

Here are a few more nuggets of wisdom from Randy Pausch, and how they relate to being a parent of a child, with special needs.  I found these lessons to ring true, especially navigating a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism:

“All you have is what you bring with you.”

I understand all too well the need to be prepared for whatever situation the day may bring with my son.  What do I need to bring and what should I anticipate?  This could be anything from an extra set of clothes, spare iPod, PECS book, AAC device, snacks, Kleenex, stim toys and more.  Identify possible trouble spots/ triggers for meltdowns/messess and come up with ways to avoid these incidences.  Also, have a contingency plan in case as Randy says, “All hell breaks loose”.”

“All you have to do is ask.”

Randy tells a story about his Dad wanting to ride in the nose cone with the driver on the monorail at Disney World.  His Dad assumed they didn’t let regular people ride up there.  Randy told his Dad he had a trick and asked if his Dad wanted to see it.  He walked up the driver and asked, and the driver said yes.  You never know unless you ask, and this is true from my experiences working with doctors, therapists, teachers and other IEP members.  Ask for IEP drafts before the meeting, and to be included in your child’s goal planning.  Ask that the parent concerns (that you’ve written ahead of time), be put directly in the IEP at the beginning of the meeting.  These concerns will be a part of what drives the IEP.  Ask the doctor for whatever your child might need for their health like, prescriptions for therapy, nutritional supplements, evaluations for orthotics and to get all test results as soon as they come in.

“Start by sitting together”

This is essential when going to your child’s IEP (Individual Eduction Plan) meetings.  Randy’s approach to working with a group of people is simple.  Lay all the cards face up on the table and say to the group, “Ok, what can we collectively make of this hand?”  He offers a few tips for a successful group meeting like having optimal meeting conditions (make sure no one is hungry, cold or tired).  I’ll add in cramped rooms with  small chairs, as this has happened to me in past IEP meetings. Randy also adds, to let everyone talk, check your egos at the door and praise each other.  Finally phrase alternatives as questions, so instead of saying, “I think we should do A and not B” try saying,  “What if we did A and not B”.  This allows the team members to offer comments rather than defend their choice.  It opens up the discussion to get input from the whole IEP team.

The lessons that Randy Pausch shares in his book, are valuable.  Here are my takeaways as they relate being a parent of a child with special needs:

*Don’t be afraid to think outside the box and try something daring.

*If you hit a brick wall, learn from it and gain more experience.

*You can’t change the cards that were dealt, but you can change how you play the hand.

*Your approach in playing that hand can be with a positive or negative attitude, it’s your choice.

*All you have to do is ask.  They might say sure, why not.

*Start by sitting together, when it comes to IEP’s the team should come together to be solution oriented, not problem oriented in collaboration approach.

Thank you Randy Pausch for the valuable lessons you shared in The Last Lecture and for the reminder to take what you have learned so that you can help others who might be starting down the same path.

And as you navigate your path always remember this…..

Randy Pausch spending time

  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice of Autism

Instagram #nickdsatuism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

Posted in Autism, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #203~ 100 Facts About Autism

Blog #203~ 100 Facts About Autism

autism did you know

As Autism Awareness Month winds down, my goal is to share information that will lead to a better understanding and acceptance for persons having autism.  I found a great link with 100 facts about autism, from Action Behavior Center.  It is a quick and easy list you can read through, in less than 10 minutes.

100 FACTS ABOUT AUTISM–  http://www.actionbehavior.com/100-things-to-know-about-autism-spectrum-disorder-in-2018/

Better understanding about autism can help individuals like my son Nick, be accepted and appreciated in our society.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Parenting Special Needs

Blog #202~ Down syndrome, A New Beginning

Blog #202~ Down syndrome, A New Beginning

So this just happened, I flew back to Texas over the weekend to be with my niece, who is also my God-daughter.  Courtney recently gave birth to twin boys.  Shortly after their birth last December, she called me with the news that one of the babies might have Down syndrome. The first thing I felt was excitement inside, knowing that God has many blessings coming her way.  I told Courtney that everything was going to be okay, and that I’d be there for her every step of the way.  I know this to be a fact, because I have been blessed for the past 24 years with my son, Nick.

My niece didn’t know that one of her twins would have Down syndrome until after she gave birth.  Just as I did, the initial shock can take your breath away and a myriad of emotions come at you in waves.  However, like me she has rolled up her sleeves and embraced this diagnosis fully.  I couldn’t be more proud of her.

The twins Gannon and Greyson 🙂

Gannon and Greyson

Courtney jumped right in becoming an advocate for her son, Gannon.  Last month, she gave a presentation to her older son’s elementary school class on World Down Syndrome Day……

Gannon WDSD

For World Down Syndrome Day, Courtney had special shirts made for her immediate and extended family, as well as friends…….

Courtney and family

Here’s my son, Nick wearing his shirt to support #gannonsjourney and World Down Syndrome Day….

Nick Down right perfect

There is a lot of love felt in their home, along with a load of testosterone, with four boys under one roof.  Her two little dogs and cat lay on the couches close by, seemingly like protectors providing comfort as we sat and visited.

Gannon and me

It was a great weekend holding, feeding and loving on the twins, along with a few games of Battleship, Candyland, Toilet Trouble and snap chat photos with the older boys.  In between all of this, we had a chance to talk about our experiences together.  During the course of these conversations, I flashed back 24 years ago when I gave birth to Nick.  I told Courtney and her husband Patrick, how the pediatrician pointed out the initial markers that might indicate my son could have Down syndrome.  My doctor gently showed me the brushfield spots in my babies eyes, the larger gap space between the first two toes, and the feeling of low muscle tone in his body.  Courtney gasped when I mentioned my pediatricians name, she thought I was joking.  It turns out that they have the same pediatrician as I did!  Not only that, her husband (who also lived in this same area outside Houston) had Dr. K as his pediatrician growing up.  Courtney started to cry as we found the similarities in our lives being so serendipitous.  They were happy tears.

Who would ever predict that this little niece and God-daughter of mine would follow such a similar path?  At the moment this photo was taken, 28 years ago I was just a doting aunt to her…..

Courtney and me

Here we are 29 years later…..

Courtney Gannon and me

In December, after the twins were born, her pediatrician pointed out similar markers of Gannon possibly having Down syndrome.  I told Courtney over the phone, that she had this.  She was already ahead of the game, with her experience having Nick as her cousin.

Courtney and Nick, 1994…..

courtney and nick

Courtney and Nick, 2010………

photo (116)

I handed my niece this journal, on Saturday.  It felt as though I was passing the baton over, as she starts her own journey…..

Journal

The journey will be filled with highs and lows as she navigates her son having Down syndrome.  As the pen moves across each page, her eyes may be filled with tears during the struggles as he grows.  But there will also be many smiles when he triumphs the milestones of crawling, sitting up, walking, feeding and so much more.  Each benchmark will take longer to reach and require much more work.   But that is what makes these victories even sweeter.  My niece is just beginning this new path, and I both smile and take a deep breath inside, knowing what lies ahead.  My son has changed my life forever and filled me with God’s grace.  Like his cousin Nick, Gannon will touch many lives and teach lessons of gratitude in the process.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂 

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

Follow Gannon #gannonsjourney

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

World Autism Awareness Day

World Autism Awareness Day

Autism Awareness Day

April 2nd is Autism Awareness Day.  “Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex developmental disorder that affects a person’s ability to communicate and interact with others. More than 3.5 million Americans currently live with ASD, and 1 in 68 children are born with a variation of it.”  With this staggering statistic, it’s likely that you have encountered an individual on the autism spectrum.

Not just today, but the entire month of April is Autism Awareness Month. During this month advocated seek to raise awareness,  understanding, acceptance, inclusion and self-determination for all individuals with ASD.

autism awareness 2016

One of the most famous and influential individuals with autism is Temple Grandin. “Temple Grandin is an American professor of animal science at Colorado State University, consultant to the livestock industry on animal behavior, and autism spokesperson. She is one of the first individuals on the autism spectrum to publicly share insights from her personal experience of autism. She invented the ‘hug box’ device to calm those on the autism spectrum.”

Temple Grandin quote 2“Based on personal experience, Grandin advocates early intervention to address autism and supportive teachers, who can direct fixations of the child with autism in fruitful directions. She has described her hypersensitivity to noise and other sensory stimuli. She claims she is a primarily visual thinker, and has said that words are her second language. Temple attributes her success as a humane livestock facility designer to her ability to recall detail, which is a characteristic of her visual memory. Grandin compares her memory to full-length movies in her head, that may be replayed at will, allowing her to notice small details. She also is able to view her memories using slightly different contexts by changing the positions of the lighting and shadows.  Her insight into the minds of cattle has taught her to value the changes in details to which animals are particularly sensitive and to use her visualization skills to design thoughtful and humane animal-handling equipment.”  (Wikipedia)

Today and throughout this month, advocates ask that you promote autism awareness and acceptance on social media, and encourage community support and understanding for individuals and families living with autism.

Autism support groups across the country are working with businesses to sponsor sensory friendly events.  Two of these are:

AMC movie theatres https://www.amctheatres.com/programs/sensory-friendly-films 

Chuck E. Cheese https://www.chuckecheese.com/deals-offers/sensory-sensitive-sundays

Although Autism Awareness Month is a great time to advocate for understanding, acceptance and inclusion, it’s essential to advocate for children, and adults, with autism year-round.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall