Posted in Autism, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #172~ Autism:5 Ways You Can Help

Blog #172~ Autism: 5 Ways You Can Help

The aim of Autism Awareness Month this year, is to educate the public about autism.  How do you react when you see or meet a person that has autism?  Autism is a complex mental condition and developmental disability, characterized by difficulties in the way a person communicates and interacts with other people.  People with autism are classed as having Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and the terms autism and ASD are often used interchangeably. A wide spectrum disorder, people will autism have set of symptoms unique to themselves; no two people are the same.

autism awareness 2016

My son Nick is 23 years old and has Down syndrome and autism.  As April comes to a close this week, I want to touch on autism awareness and acceptance.  Since the aim this month is to educate the public about autism,  I would like to challenge each of you to open your mind and heart to people having autism, along with their families and caregivers.

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Here are 5 things you can do to show acceptance and support:

*Open your heart, give a smile to a family struggling out in public with a child who has autism.  If you are a praying person, say a prayer for compassion and tolerance.

*Reach out, pay a compliment or offer help, to a family who might be dealing with a difficult time with their child.  “You have a lovely family.” “You are a wonderful parent, I admire your patience.”  If you encounter a family going through a tough time, such as a meltdown, or if the child is shutting down, ask them “What can I do to help?”

*Be a friend, make a phone call to check in, set up a coffee or lunch date, or offer to help out with carpooling or running an errand.  Bring a bottle of wine or a Starbucks latte, over and chat.  Many parents may not get a chance to speak to other adults on a daily basis.

*Teach your child about inclusivity.  Invite a classmate with autism, to your child’s birthday party.  Show that they are genuinely welcome, even if their child can only tolerate a short time.  Look into inclusion opportunities for your child at school like lunch buddy or peer partner programs and volunteering for Special Olympics.  These are all ways to teach your child to be kind and compassionate.

It’s great to see that Sesame Street just added a new muppet, Julia who has autism!

Julia Sesame Street

*Stand up and advocate, if you overhear someone saying something inconsiderate about autism or any other disability, speak up!  Share about autism on your social media.

Awareness and acceptance means allowing yourself to be open, compassionate and kind.  Acceptance is not about tolerating others that are different from you.  It is about valuing our differences as human beings, and seeing the heart and strengths that lies in each of us.  That’s what is in my noggin as Autism Awareness Month wraps up this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram @ #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #171~Rocking the Socks, and Helping Twice

Blog #171~Rocking the Socks, and Helping Twice

wehelptwo

The first part of rocking the funky socks campaign was to promote awareness on World Down Syndrome Day (WDSD), held each year on 3/21. The second part was for every pack that we sold, We Help Two donated a pair of warm, thermal socks which we donated to a local homeless shelter in our community.

My son Nick is 23 years old and has Down syndrome and autism.  The sock campaign raised $500.00 which we donated to Chicago based, The National Association for Down Syndrome, (NADS) http://www.nads.org.

world-down-syndrome-day

Last week, we took a full box of 59 pair of thermal socks donated by We Help Two, over to the Hesed House in Aurora, IL.  We Help Two partners with schools, organizations, individuals and non-profits to make twice the difference.

Nick Hessed House 2

 “The Hesed House is the second largest shelter in the State of Illinois, and the largest shelter outside of the city of Chicago. With the help of professional staff, alliances with outside agencies and 6,000 volunteers from 70 area churches, almost one thousand individuals (including 188 children) are served each year through Hesed House’s shelter and three housing programs. Hesed House sees 16 newly homeless individuals each week – that’s one new homeless individual every 8 1/2 hours. Hesed House strives to get 16 or 17 individuals out of homelessness each week.” 

hesed house logo

The Hesed House is not just a homeless shelter.  Besides providing shelter and supportive living, they also have employment training and education, along with medical assistance, counseling for substance abuse and mental illness, and offer state legal services.

Nick and I were pleased to pay it forward, with the donation of new thermal socks to Hesed House, courtesy of We Help Two.  For more information visit their website at http://www.wehelptwo.com.

Nick and Mom at Hessed House 2

A special thank you to Bethany from We Help Two, for reaching out to us for WDSD, to host a “Rock the Socks” campaign.  We Help Two is making a difference!   We were very happy to partner with them. Nick and I want to thank everyone who purchased and rocked the funky socks, and helped us make twice the difference.  That’s what is in my noggin this week! 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram @ #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Feeding, Personal Hygiene, Toileting

Blog #170~Teaching Independent Living Skills

Blog #170~Teaching Independent Living Skills

Brushing your teeth, bathing, dressing, and doing household chores, are all a part of what a parent teaches their child.  But what if you are a parent of a child with special needs?  How do you teach these independent living skills?

Nick vacumming_Tabor Hills (3)

My son Nick is 23 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  He has learned many self-help skills, and assists around the house with several chores.  These independent living skills give him a sense of accomplishment and pride.  It also takes the burden off me as his mom.

So how do you get started?  First, identify areas that you want to work on with your child.  Pick just one skill, that your child can do with assistance.  This skill should have value and interest to them.  Take for instance the task of washing your hands.  This was something my son liked to do because he enjoys running the faucets. 😉  The next step is to break down the task into simple steps.  Take these simple steps and determine what supports are needed to teach this skill.  For a child that has autism, it helps greatly to provide visual supports.  This can be written instructions, using picture sequences, or video modeling.

Picture sequence for washing hands….

handwashing routine

When using picture sequences, determine with your child’s teacher, if it’s more effective to use the style above, or actual photographs of the sequence.  Each child is different in how they can understand pictures. You can find many picture sequences on Google Images, or ask your child’s support teacher to make you some.  Another option is to use an iPad, and download apps that show these sequences.  There are tons apps available, here is just one of many:

iPad App called iDo Hygiene (free app)….

iDo hygiene

Once the visual supports are in place, you can guide your child step by step, using “hand over hand technique” to teach the motor skills.  As your child develops these skills, begin to fade back, by point prompting to each picture.  Be sure to use lots of praise and cheer them on their successes.

Here are a few examples of other self-help skills that you can work on with your child around the house:

*Hygiene skills like brushing teeth, showering, washing face and hands, brushing hair, toileting, shaving.

*Recycling and can crushing

*Shredding

*Help with laundry

Nick laundry

*Unload the dishwasher

*Set the table

*Make the bed

*Fold and put away laundry

*Water plants

Nick watering plants

*Cleaning windows and countertops

*Dusting

*Unload groceries and put them away

Nick toilet paper

*Cooking

*Vacuuming

Many of these household chores provide great sensory input.  Push and pull activities like carrying laundry baskets and vacuuming, are excellent examples.  Heavy work provides proprioceptive input to the muscles & joints.  This can be very calming, organizing, and regulating, decreasing stress and anxiety.

Not all of the skills above are Nick’s favorites to do.  As a parent,  you can determine which activities are more motivating for your child.  Focus on those first.  Nick really enjoys vacuuming.  Another strength Nick has is matching, and remembering where things go.  So for him, unloading the dishwasher and putting groceries away were both easier and motivating for him to do.

Teaching your child independent living skills, will strengthen their abilities to hold a job in the future.

Nick doing volunteer work at GiGi’s Playhouse…

nick-cleaning-gigis

It also fosters a sense of fulfillment and gratification for them, as well.  So, pick one task, roll up your sleeves and get to work. That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #169~ I’m Very Aware of Autism and More

Blog #169~ I’m Very Aware of Autism and More

autism ribbon

April is “Autism Awareness Month” – a time to promote awareness, acceptance and attention to those people who are diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum.

Yes, I’m very aware of autism, and more.  So is anyone, who has been around my son.  Nick is 23 years old, and has dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism, (DS-ASD).  He does a good job spreading awareness wherever he goes. 🙂  Honestly, it’s hard for me to get on board with the “Light it Up Blue” campaign.  Why is that?  Because my son doesn’t fit in with any of the support groups for autism, due to his is lack of speech, cognitive and developmental delays.

“Autism or Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), is a serious neurodevelopmental disorder that impairs a child’s ability to communicate and interact with others. It also includes restricted repetitive behaviors, interests and activities. These issues cause significant impairment in social, occupational and other areas of functioning.”

autism awareness 2016

Since my son has a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD, I’m going to put my focus on this area.  According to The National Down Syndrome Society (NDSS) http://www.ndss.org:

“Children who have ASD may or may not exhibit all of these characteristics at any one time nor will they consistently demonstrate their abilities across similar circumstances. Some of the variable characteristics of ASD we have commonly observed in children with DS-ASD include:

  • Unusual response to sensations (especially sounds, lights, touch or pain)
  • Food refusal (preferred textures or tastes)
  • Unusual play with toys and other objects
  • Difficulty with changes in routine or familiar surroundings
  • Little or no meaningful communication
  • Disruptive behaviors (aggression, throwing tantrums, or extreme non-compliance)
  • Hyperactivity, short attention, and impulsivity
  • Self-injurious behavior (skin picking, head hitting or banging, eye-poking, or biting)
  • Sleep disturbances
  • History of developmental regression (esp. language and social skills)”

NDSS_logo

My son Nick, certainly hits most of the bullet points listed above.  It’s a unique mix having a child with a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD.  For many years, I felt isolated from the local DS support group because my child had many of those characteristics.  Eventually, I was put in contact with a small group of parents that also had children with DS-ASD.  This was a group within The National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS), here is Chicago.  Finding this group, made all the difference.  These parents were in the same boat, sharing similar experiences, struggles, and yes funny stories, that I could relate to.  In addition to local support groups, there are many online groups for DS-ASD on Facebook.

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During Autism Awareness Month, I would like to see the government and media focus   on more educational, behavioral supports and other treatment options.  What is going to happen to our kids when they age out of the school system?  There aren’t near enough employment opportunities, day programs or group homes for this rapidly growing population.  In addition, I’d like there to be an easier path to obtain funding through the government.

understanding

For the month of April, parents of a child with autism, or a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD, need understanding and support. Do you know a parent with a child who has autism?  Consider lending someone a hand, so they can run an errand.   We also need more compassion, and less judgment when we are out in public with our child.   And many of us, could use a good night’s sleep.

autism and sleep cartoon

You can also help by sharing information and stories, to raise awareness on social media. A better informed public will be more empathetic and supportive towards people with autism and a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest- Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram- #nickdsautism

Twitter- @tjunnerstall

Posted in Autism, Autism Safety and Wandering, Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #168~ New Disability Identification Card

Blog #168~ New Disability Identification Card

This morning, I attended an event presented by Illinois State Representative, Stephanie Kifowit at the Aurora Police Department.   Last year, she sponsored legislation to create a disability awareness card.  Many individuals in our community live with special needs.  Often, their conditions can sometimes make it difficult to communicate in stressful situations.  This new disability wallet card was unveiled to foster better communication for individuals who struggle during these times.

State Representative Stephanie Kifowit….

FullSizeRender

This initiative was the idea of School Board President Lori Price, who is a parent of a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Persons with autism spectrum disorder and other disabilities may shut down, get nervous, panic or display inappropriate behaviors during high stress situations.  The disability awareness card is a tool, to help individuals quickly identify themselves to first responders and other public figures.   An individual can quickly show this wallet card, which will help to prevent a situation from escalating.

Face it, we all get nervous when being pulled over by a police officer.  Imagine what it must feel like for a person medically diagnosed with an intellectual, developmental or mental disability. This wallet card is different from the state ID card, as it contains the following…..

On this card, these conditions may present a person who:

*Appears deaf or unable to understand

*Has difficulty speaking or communicating

*Engages in repetitive or self-stimulating behaviors such as rocking or hand flapping.  

*Becomes agitated due to physical contact or stressful situations

*Acts indifferent or unresponsive

These conditions are stated on the card along with this statement:

“Please do not interpret my behavior as refusal to cooperate.  To better communicate with me, it can be helpful to speak slowly and clearly, repeat questions and allow time for responses.”

“If those techniques are unsuccessful, I request that you contact the person noted below on my behalf as he/she will confirm my diagnosis and provide information you may need about my identity or condition.”

These cards are free to individuals who have been approved by the Secretary of State’s office for an Illinois Person with a Disability ID card.  

For an application click here @https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com

I applaud State Representative Stephanie Kifowit for taking Lori Price’s idea for this simple card, that will improve communication and help de-escalate high stress situations.  This will assist law enforcement and first responders in keeping our loved ones safe.  Readers , please let me know if an identification card like this has been implemented, where you live.  If not, perhaps it’s time to champion this effort!

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Who’s getting funky on World Down Syndrome Day, 3/21?

Deadline for ordering your funky socks for World Down Syndrome Day is this Thursday.  Support our campaign to help The National Association for Down Syndrome and our local homeless shelter by ordering and rocking your socks on, 3/21!  Click here to order: https://my.wehelptwo.com/campaign?reset=1&id=373

Follow Nick:

Down Syndrome With A Slice of Autism on Facebook and Pinterest

#dsautism on Instagram

@tjunnerstall on Twitter

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

World Down Syndrome Day~ Rock Your Socks

funky-socks

World Down Syndrome Day~ Rock Your Socks

Mark your calendars for 3/21/17, that’s World Down Syndrome Day!

“World Down Syndrome Day is observed on March 21. On this day, people with Down syndrome and those who live and work with them throughout the world organize and participate in activities and events to raise public awareness and create a single global voice for advocating for the rights, inclusion and well-being of people with Down syndrome.”

world-down-syndrome-day

One of the trademarks of World Down Syndrome Day, is rocking your socks!  This year I have a partnership with We Help Two, to advocate,  raise money and awareness for Down syndrome.  It’s easy and fun way to help out by ordering some cool, funky socks. We Help Two, sent me sample packages of these socks.  They are really bright, fun and well made.

You can purchase these socks at $15.oo per 3-pack, and it will be mailed to you, using 2-day shipping.  A large portion of the proceeds from this campaign, will go directly to the National Association for Syndrome, (NADS) http://www.nads.org.

nads-logo

AND ON TOP OF THAT for every pack of funky socks sold, We Help Two will give a pair of warm, thermal socks to donate to our local homeless shelter.

warm-sock-photo

Help Nick and I knock the socks off World Down Syndrome Day by raising awareness, along with buying and wearing some funky socks.  You’ll be supporting NADS and helping the homeless.  That’s a win win for everyone!

To ORDER your FUNKY SOCKS click here:  

https://my.wehelptwo.com/campaign?reset=1&id=373

Hurry and order yours today, so you can rock your socks on 3/21 WDSD!  Thank you in advance for helping us, and spreading the word that Down syndrome rocks. That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

IMG01

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs, Resources for Special Needs

Winter 2017 Update

Winter 2017 Update

I hesitate to call this a “winter” update, as we’ve been enjoying a string of mild, 65 degree days here in the Chicago area.

Hot tub in February, no jacket required…..

nick-hot-tub-feb

My son Nick, just celebrated his 23rd birthday a few weeks ago.  He has Down syndrome and autism.  He has been going to an adult day program, for the past year.  The program offers a variety of enriching activities, which he completely enjoys.  In addition, Nick does many community outings with his awesome respite caregivers, Jodi and Lara.  They go out to eat at a variety of restaurants, to the movies, library, and parks.  Nick loves being out and about, in the community.

We have been very active in our local Down syndrome support group, The National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS).  Even before we relocated to the Chicago area, NADS was instrumental in providing information and support for us.  They have been a vital resource for our family, and many others in the Chicagoland area.  To find our more information about The National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS), click here: http://www.nads.org.

nads-logo

The NADS Bowl-A-Thon event, is coming up on March 5th.  This event, is the single largest fundraiser for NADS.  This year, Nick has a fundraising page for his bowling team. You can click on the link to support Nick’s Elbow Bumpers Team and NADS:

http://www.firstgiving.com/fundraiser/nick-unnerstall/nads-32nd-annual-bowl-a-thon 

Big Guy’s signature elbow bump with his brother, Hank…..

nick-and-bro-x-mas

One more update, I want to briefly mention is coming up on March 21st, which is World Down Syndrome Day. 

world-down-syndrome-day

“World Down Syndrome Day is observed on March 21. On this day, people with Down syndrome and those who live and work with them throughout the world organize and participate in activities and events to raise public awareness and create a single global voice for advocating for the rights, inclusion and well-being of people with Down syndrome.”

One of the trademarks of World Down Syndrome Day, is rocking your socks!  This year I am working on partnership to raise money and awareness for Down syndrome, where you can purchase some funky socks.  I’ll be posting more information about this next week, on this site and the social media sites listed below. Stay tuned……

funky-socks

The Down syndrome community has supported Nick and our family, so much over the past 23 years.  These fundraising efforts are the least that we can do to give back, and help other families going down the same path. Having a community of support has helped us to navigate Nick’s world. Now at age 23, Nick is a very happy, young man who enjoys life.  That certainly brings a smile to my face. 🙂

nick-smiling

That’s what is in my noggin this week! 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism on Facebook and Pinterest

#nickdsautism on Instagram

@tjunnerstall on Twitter

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Parenting Special Needs, Uncategorized

Blog #167~Brittany’s Baskets of Hope

brittany-baskets

Blog #167~Brittany’s Baskets of Hope

“Just because you are born with a disability, it doesn’t mean you can’t do everything you want to do!”   This is the message that a young entrepreneur, Brittany Schiavone wants to share with the world.  Brittany’s Baskets of Hope, Inc. is a non-profit organization which creates and delivers welcome baskets full of resources, love and hope to new Down syndrome families across the country.

brittanys-basket-contents

Brittany’s Baskets of Hope’s mission, is to celebrate and support families with a new baby with Down syndrome. “We want all newborns of every ability to know that they can do anything!”

Currently, this non-profit organization has sent baskets to over 175 families in 42 states across the country!   Brittany has spoken at schools, colleges, and conferences across Long Island.  Her work has been featured on FOXBusiness.com, The Mighty, Ditch the Label, Elephant Journal, and News 12 Long Island, where she was selected as one of the news channel’s “12 Making a Difference in 2016.”

100% of the funds raised go to supporting families who have a new baby with Down syndrome.  These donations are used to purchase items for the welcome baskets and to mail them to families.  Each basket is put together personally by her, and includes resources and a variety of baby items.  Brittany wants to spread the word, “That no matter who you are or how you’re born, you can lead a full, joyful life!”

If you would like to request a basket to be sent to a new family having a baby with Down syndrome or make a donation to Brittany’s Baskets of Hope, click here:

http://www.brittanysbasketsofhope.org

 You can follow and support this organization on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter as well!

brittanys-baskets-of-hope-logo

My son Nick, was born with Down syndrome.  After speneding a week in the hospital ICU, he was released on Valentine’s day, 23 years ago.  I was sent home with only a couple of brochures about Down syndrome ,and nothing more.  Looking back it would have been wonderful to receive such a gift and the reassurance from an adult having Down syndrome like her.  I applaud Brittany for her generosity, positive spirit, and commitment to help other families.  Her baskets are filled with resources and special baby gifts for new babies with Down syndrome and given freely with her love.  And most importantly, she sends with each family a strong message of hope.  That’s something a new parent receiving a recent diagnosis of Down syndrome needs the most.

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa

Follow Nick on Facebook & Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism, Instragram #nickdsautism, and on Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Parenting Special Needs

Blog #166~ Lessons Learned on a Ski Slope

vail

Blog #166~ Lessons Learned on a Ski Slope

After a 27 year hiatus, I recently went on a ski trip to Vail, Colorado.  My older son, Hank had never skied before so we opted to take a lesson together.  Our instructor Brad, offered up many useful tips to help us navigate the slopes. Many of the things that Brad pointed out, can apply to raising a child with special needs.  My younger son, Nick is 22, and has Down syndrome and autism.  The daily challenges can weigh a parent down both physically and mentally.  That’s were the lessons I learned on a ski slope come in.

Lessons Learned on a Ski Slope…….

*If you point your ski’s too far uphill you are going to roll down…..

Over the years I’ve set goals for my son, Nick.  Many of these were aimed too high.  As a result, my expectations were not realistic, and Nick fell further back than I anticipated.  For example, during his elementary years Nick had a handwriting goal.  I was determined that he would be able to write his name and pushed hard for several year to keep it in his IEP.  This goal was my dream, but not Nick’s reality.  A pen or marker in Nick’s hands equals scribbling all over his skin and clothes.  I learned that you have to adjust your child’s goals to what is reasonable and attainable for them, and not for yourself.

*Don’t Fred Flintstone your feet…..

When you ski it’s important to shift the weight on your feet and apply the pressure at different points in order to make the turns.  If you dig in and “Fred Flintstone” your feet, the skiing becomes rigid and doesn’t glide naturally.  There has to be room for some give and take, when working with a child with special needs. It’s unfair to put pressure on your child to do everything you want, in a given day.  Sometimes you have to let that foot up and allow them to have room to understand, process, and do things in their own time. Take your foot off the brakes, otherwise, things will break down for your child.

fred-flintstone-feet

*Learn how to stop correctly…….

The day before our ski lesson, my son Hank went out with his Dad, Al, to try out skiing.  He came home very tired, cranky and discouraged due to going to fast, falling, and struggling to get back up.  During the ski lesson, he learned how to maneuver his body, and the proper ways to stop.  Afterwards, Hank had much more confidence and felt success.  If you push your child with special needs to do too much, they become frustrated as Hank did. This can lead to a risk of sensory  overload and potential meltdowns.  Recognize those signs of distress, and stop the activity before your child reaches a boiling point.

Hank and I with our ski instructor, Brad…..

vail-with-brad

*Relax and take in the scenery….

On the ski lift, our instructor Brad, encouraged me to put my ski’s up on the foot rest and relax.  He could sense that I was nervous about leaving the comfort of the bunny slope.  He reminded me to breathe, look around, and take in the beautiful scenery.  I think the same can be true in life with a child who has special needs.  The seamless schedule of doctor and therapy appointments, along with the pressure of working with them at home can get to be too much.   Nick had very low muscle tone, which is a trait of having Down syndrome.  I was constantly providing stimulating activities and exercises to get him stronger so he could roll over, crawl, sit up and walk.  Beyond gross motor skills, there was work to be done with feeding, speech and fine motor skills. The guilt of not feeling like you are doing enough for your child can burden a parent even more.  At some point, you have to just relax and not beat yourself up.  Take a breath and enjoy the beauty of your child for who they are.

My son, Nick……

nick-senior-alarm-pic

Skiing like many other sports offer lessons for us to learn in our lives.  That day on the slopes,  I was reminded about the importance of being flexible in what I expect from my son with Down syndrome and autism.  On the eve of his 23rd birthday, I reflect back on how far Nick has come.  I going to take a moment and breathe.  Like the backdrop of the blue sky against the snow covered Rocky Mountains,  I just want to take that in.  🙂 

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa

happy-birthday-boys

Wishing both Nick and his Dad, Al a very Happy Birthday this week ……

al-and-nick-vail

Follow Nick on Instagram @nickdsautism, on Facebook and Pinterest @Down syndrome with a Slice of Autism and Twitter #tjunnerstall

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Fun Side of Nick

Blog #165~ Betty White on Staying Positive

betty-white

Blog #165~ Betty White on Staying Positive

Betty White turned 95 last week, and beams with happiness and positivity!  She was interviewed by Katie Couric, who asked this American treasure, about the state of our country, and how divided it is.

Here is what Betty had to say……

“It’s not in the best place we’ve ever been, but I think that’s the time, to buckle down and really work positively as much as you can. Instead of saying, Oh this is terrible, oh he’s terrible, just think alright, there is nothing I can do about that right now. But I can do the best in my little circle.  So if I do that, maybe you’ll do your best, and we’ll get through.”

Katie Couric went on to state how hard it is for some people to be positive, with so much negativity with the barrage of politics and social media creating a toxic environment.  Betty, acknowledged this, and offered these thoughts…….  

So many people think negatively saying, you know what I hate, oh I hate this.  Instead of alright, I’ll get through this.  Then you start lifting up a bit.”

rise-by-lifting-others

“If you start with, you know what I hate, you’re going to go right down the tubes” 

Betty White is a positive thinker, in her words a “cockeyed optimist” and attributes that to staying happy all 95 years of her life.  I thought about this interview, when the sun came out after countless foggy, gray days here in Chicago.  I took a power walk soaking in the sunny, blue skies and mild 55 degree day.  I could feel the sunshine lifting my spirits.  Not everyday starts with sunshine, especially in January.  But my day ALWAYS start with a smile, (and usually a fart and giggle), from my son, Nick.  He is 22 years old and has Down syndrome and autism.

nick-culvers

It’s a great way to start each day.🙂  Nick’s smile is contagious, his attitude uplifting.  Anyone in Nick’s inner circle has witnessed his joy.  A treat at Culver’s brings on such happiness to big guy.  Nick does well finding pleasure in the simple things, being silly, and making people laugh. Yes, he has his moments of getting frustrated and upset like the rest of us.  But he shakes it off, never holding a grudge or negativity.

Betty White and my son, Nick, have the right idea by entering each day with a positive attitude.  It will not only elevate your mood, but those around you.

It’s no wonder why Betty White looks and feels these way she does at age 95, with her words of wisdom…….. *Buckle down  *Think positive  *Do the best in your little circle *You got to get through this, one foot in front of the other.  

Let the sunshine come out in your heart and beam onto others. Your positive spirit will ripple out of your own circle and expand to those around you. That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

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