Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs

Blog #176~ Special Needs Summer Recreation Programs

Blog #176~Special Needs Summer Recreation Programs

The heat is on!  Are you looking into programs for your child with special needs this summer?  There are many types of programs available including camps, athletic and leisure programs.  A great place to start is to contact your local park district to see if they offer any special recreation programs.  For programs in here in Illinois click on this link: http:// www.specialrecreation.org

Here are some links for special needs summer programs:

Special Olympics- http:// www.specialolympics.org

Buddy Up Tennis- http:// www.buddyuptennis.com

Top Soccer- http://www.topsoccer.us

I Can Ride Bike Camps- https://www.icanshine.org

Easter Seals- http://www.easterseals.com

Gi Gi’s Playhouse- https://www.gigisplayhouse.org

American Camp Association- https://acacamps.org

Very Well has a list of Inclusive Sports Programs- https://www.verywell.com/special-needs-sports-programs-3106922

Friendship Circle List of Camps- http://www.friendshipcircle.org/blog/2013/02/13/25-summer-camps-for-individuals-with-special-needs/

Diveheart Scuba program- http://diveheart.org

Diveheart 2013 336

My son Nick (pictured above), is 23 years old and has Down syndrome and autism.  He has participated in many of these programs over the years.  These include Special Olympics, Challenger Baseball League, Top Soccer, swim lessons, Diveheart and I Can Shine Bike Camp.  During the summer months he also attended ESY (Extended Summer Year) summer school.  These programs helped him to learn new skills, have a structured routine, and develop friendships.

Nick at ESY Summer School…..

 

I Can Shine Bike Camp….

photo (124)

Many of these programs are available for children with special needs throughout the U.S.  My son Nick had great experiences in participating in these programs.  If you know of a program you would like to share, please contact me.  I’m always updating my resource list on this website and sharing them with other support groups.  Here’s to a great summer 🙂

That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Doctors and Dentists, Down syndrome

Blog #175~ Dentist Visits for Special Needs

Blog #175~Dentist Visits for Special Needs

teeth emoji

Taking a child with special needs to the dentist can be challenging.  It ranks right up there with hair cuts and blood draws at the medical lab.  My son Nick is 23 years old, and has Down syndrome and autism.  His speech deficits and sensory issues makes it difficult to get a proper dental examination and cleaning.  Now that Nick is an adult, we changed from a pediatric dentist to one that specializes in working with adults with special needs.  The experience for my son went very well, and here’s why it was successful.

Here are 5 tips to help with dentist visits for special needs:

*1- Find a dentist who specializes in working with persons having special needs.  Get referrals from other families and therapists.

*2- Request to schedule the appointment during the quiet time at the office.

*3- Create a social story either with a written checklist or pictures for your child to follow.  For a child with autism, if they can see it, then they can understand it.  This guide will be like a map to follow, and can help to lessen anxiety.

I printed a social story from Google Images and added a highly preferred reward of Taco Bell at the end of the visit:

dentist social story

At home we have a tooth brushing sequence laminated for Nick to follow.  You can print this PDF out for your child to use:  teeth

*4- The dentist should take the time to go at your child’s pace, based on their sensitivity and level of anxiousness.  His new dentist allotted plenty of time to ease into the exam, and for Nick to get comfortable with him.  Nick didn’t want to sit in the chair right away, even with my point prompts to the social story.  First, they put one of his favorite cartoons on the flat screen TV.  Then, the dentist put his gloved hands out for Nick to touch and get use to the feel and texture.  After a few minutes along with a several high-five and elbow bumps, Nick sat down in the chair.  He continued to narrow the gap of proximity, so that Nick was could get use to him being close.

On the first visit, the dentist was able to do brief examination and brush Nick’s teeth counting to 23 (his age) twice.  He took several breaks, giving lots of praise and elbow bumps.  We scheduled another visit three weeks later to try to build Nick’s tolerance level and continue to develop their relationship.  On the second visit, he was more at ease, sitting down in the chair right away.  The dentist completed a deeper examination, as Nick was able to tolerate even more this time.  He was able to clean, floss and even brush fluoride on Nick’s teeth!

Nick dentist two

*5- The key to having success on these visits was allowing time for Nick to feel more relaxed and establishing trust.  The dentist worked slowly to desensitize, picking up on any verbal or non-verbal cues.  He adjusted his pace accordingly, to match what my son could handle.  His dentist understood the importance of building this trust and relationship, thus earning the right to provide more clinical care.

The tips of *1-finding the right dentist, *2-scheduling appointments during off times, *3-providing a social story, *4-breaking down the examination slowly and *5-establishing a trusting relationship, all helped greatly to lead to successful dentist visits.

If your child has sensitivities, you may also want to see if they can tour the office before the appointment.  If need be, ask if the lighting can be adjusted and whether they offer the use of a weighted vest (which provides deep pressure which can be calming).  In some cases, it may be necessary to sedate a child that is uncooperative or needs more advanced care.

At this time with my son, we will continue to build on the solid foundation we’ve begun with his new dentist without the use of sedation for as long as possible.  These baby steps helped to lessen Nick’s anxiety for dental visits in the future.  I appreciate the time, care and concern for my son’s best interests in providing such a positive experience.  That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall