Posted in Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

DS-ASD,How to Manage Throwing and Dropping Behaviors

DS-ASD, How to Manage Throwing and Dropping Behaviors

Over the weekend I read several posts on Facebook dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD) groups.  Many parents were seeking help and guidance.  Their big question was- How to manage throwing and dropping behaviors?  My son Nick is 25 years old.  He has  a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD, and his fair share of these two behaviors.  Short of waving a magic wand, these undesirable behaviors can be curtailed with behavior management.

magic wand (2)

The first step is to determine what function the target behavior is serving.  When you can decipher what purpose the behavior has for a child, and when these occur, you and the IEP team can come up with a plan for behavior management. A behavior support plan (BSP) can outline strategies and replacement behaviors that are more suitable and desired both at school and home.

You can read more about how identify the function of behaviors and put a positive behavior support plan in place for dropping and throwing by clicking on the following link:

https://nickspecialneeds.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/blog-3-getting-your-goat/

This is one of the first blogs that I wrote back in 2012, that provides a blueprint on how we managed the throwing and dropping behaviors with my son, Nick. Blog #3~DS-ASD Getting your goat, still happens to be one of my favorites, to this day. 🙂

The current status of dropping and throwing behaviors with my son varies from day-to-day.  The function is still boredom and attention seeking and somewhat sensory related, when we as his parents, are busy around the house. Since 2012, Nick has more jobs around the house like recycling, unloading the dishwasher, vacuuming, and helping to roll the garbage and recycling bins to the  curb. Heavy work activities are part of a good sensory diet that are calming and organizing to the brain. I still have to remind myself not to let Nick get my goat.  But instead, I try my best to respond, and not react.  I highly recommend this great resource book, by David S. Stein, Psy. D., to learn more about behavior management:  

Book Supporting Positive Behavior DS

Behavior management can help decrease the incidences of negative behaviors such as throwing and dropping in children, teens and adults with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD).  Collaborate with the IEP team and a certified BCBA therapist to do the detective work with a functional behavior assessment (FBA) that can lead to a positive behavior support plan (BSP).  Remember always try to respond and not react, when your child is trying to get your goat.

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice of Autism

Instagram #nickdsaustism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

Posted in Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

DS-ASD~Getting Additional Services and Support to Help Your Child

DS-ASD~Getting Additional Services and Support to Help Your Child

Are you a parent of a child with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD)?  Or do you have a child that you suspect may have an additional diagnosis of autism along with Down syndrome?  My son, Nick is 25 years old and has a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD.  When we got the secondary diagnosis of autism, our son was able to receive additional support and services both in school and home.

This week, I want to share some of the additional services, support and resources that has helped us to navigate the dual diagnosis of DS-ASD with our son, Nick.

down syndrome and autism bracelet

Click on the following link to learn more: 

https://nickspecialneeds.com/2016/09/12/blog-155more-than-just-down-syndrome/

Navigating the path of a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD with your child has its challenges.  But there are many services, supports and resources that can enable parents and educators to help a child with DS-ASD.  Obtaining these services does take patience and tenacity, and it doesn’t happen overnight. (In fact, getting these services and supports took several years for us.)  But all of these tools will better equip you as a parent to take on the secondary diagnosis of autism, along with Down syndrome.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

Posted in Adult Day Programs for Special Needs, Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs

Blog #229~DS-ASD Winter Update

Blog #229~DS-ASD Winter Update

Chicago winter 2019

This winter weather has been bitter and harsh, here in Chicago.  Fortunately, we missed the plummeting temperatures last week, while vacationing in Vail, Colorado.  My son, Nick is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD).  Here’s an update on what Nick’s been up to this winter and the highlights of our trip to Vail.

The weather in Vail was mild, with temperatures in the 35-40 degree range and plenty of sunshine.  There is something to be said about sunlight and how it can elevate your mood.  The clear blue skies, warm sun, fresh air, and beautiful mountain views, can do wonders for the soul.

Vail sunset 2019

Nick enjoyed his time with our friends in Vail.  The village is always a fun place to visit.  Here’s Nick at lunch and with his Dad, Al :)…..

 

The highlight of the week, for Nick was dog sledding.  This is the second year we’ve done this with Mountain Mushers, who offer the best dog sledding rides in the Vail Valley.  Nick was happy to see his buddy, Cameron who was our dog sled musher last year.  He always gets such a kick seeing all the happy dogs, who bark with excitement as the sleds loaded up.

All bundled up in the sled and ready to go, and guess what, he actually kept his hat and gloves on this time.  Yay Nick! 🙂

 

The scenic trail was packed with alot more snow this year, making the ride faster. His favorite part is when the sled goes over the bumps and flies down the hills. Nick is a thrill seeker, who always signs “more” when a roller coaster ride is over.  He also loves the Disney movie Snow Dogs, so this was a perfect blend of his favorite things.  Towards the end of the ride, his Dad got to try his hand at mushing.  Check out the Facebook, Instagram and Twitter links below to see videos of them dog sledding in action all this week. 🙂 

Today it’s a balmy 50 degrees here in Chicago, and Nick has returned to his adult developmental training day program.  It’s hard to believe the turn around in temperatures……

Chicago temp difference

As I’ve mentioned in previous blog posts, Nick attends a day program that he truly enjoys.  The adult developmental training program curriculum includes functional and academic work activities, crafts, exercise, cooking, entertainment, and community outings.  The staff reports that Nick has so much potential and does awesome at the learning centers and work choices.  They have a lot of fun, especially over the holidays. Activities included a big Christmas lunch, wearing ugly sweaters, listening to a local high school choir and making wreaths, gingerbread houses and pillows.

Here’ s a no sew pillow that Nick made…..

nick pillow

If you look closely in the picture above, you might notice a stop icon on the dishwasher.  There are many of these stop signs on the start buttons around our house.  Individuals with a diagnosis of autism can benefit from the use of icons, to better guide their days.  Nick has a thing for pushing buttons and fire alarms.  His behavior support plan (BSP) addresses the fire alarm pulling.  Twice each day, the staff at his day program take him on a walk down the hallways.  They encourage and cue him to “keep walking” with “hands to self”.  Before these walks, the staff reads his social story that contains pictures of how to  navigate these hall walks.  Upon successful completion, Nick earns a reward.

Click on this link to learn more about the BSP and his social story: https://nickspecialneeds.com/tag/social-stories/

That wraps up Nick’s world and what he’s been up to this winter.  Navigating a dual diagnosis of  DS-ASD has it’s good and bad days.  Fortunately, the good days now outweigh the bad.  I think it’s both maturity on Nick’s part, along with the wisdom and understanding gained from being his parent.  Big guy has a milestone birthday coming up, I look forward to sharing more with you next Monday!  What is one thing that Nick has taught you over the past 24+ years?  I’d love to hear your feedback. 🙂

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 

Follow Nick on Social Media to see more pics and videos:

Nick head shot in vail

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism and more on dog sledding #mountainmushers

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Adult Day Programs for Special Needs, Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #224~Using Social Stories for Behavior Management

Blog #224~Using Social Stories for Behavior Management

Nick’s got a thing for button pushing, all kinds.  You name it, he pushes them, including mine.  Phone intercom, microwave fan, dishwasher, and his all-time favorite, fire alarms. My son is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.   He has a behavior support plan in place to address this behavior, along with throwing and dropping objects.  The incidences of the behaviors, seem to occur when he is bored or seeking attention.  It would be tempting to just throw my hands up in the air and accept this as Nick just being Nick.  However, I have always been determined to find ways to make things better for my son.  So, a few months ago, I rolled up my sleeves and got to work with Nick’s behaviorist.  Have things improved, yes and that’s what I’m happy to report this week.

Big Guy Nick 🙂

Nick has quite a rap sheet pulling over 50 fire alarm pulls since third grade.  In Blog #216~Putting Social Stories Into Action, I wrote about creating social stories to shape the desired behavior you want for a child.  A social story is a visual support that can help individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities understand new events, along with reinforcing skills, tasks or behaviors.  The behaviorist and I created an incentive plan built into a social story. This is reviewed twice at his adult developmental training program.  The story encourages Nick to make good choices.  Following the story read, Nick walks the halls with a staff member.

The staff cues Nick, using the compliance commands, “hands to self” and “big guys keep walking”.  Now I hope this doesn’t jinx anything, but I’m pleased to report that Nick has gone 3 months without pulling a fire alarm.  🙂

Now back to the behaviors he exhibits around the house.  In Blog #216, the behavior of throwing his iPads was addressed.  For a week, I locked both of them up.  After a very long week, Nick was excited to get them back.  Before this occurred, I read this social story to him several times, having him follow along and pointing to the basket where he needs to put the iPads when he is all done.  The incidences of Nick dropping and throwing his iPads has reduced significantly.

iPad Social Story:

The success of the behaviors improving are due to 3 things.  Nick, as do many individuals with autism, respond well to visuals.  He may not be able to read words, but he can follow along with the pictures and understand what is expected.  Secondly, parents and caregivers must be consistent in reading the social story and remain in close proximity, reminding the child to make good choices.  Behavior change doesn’t happen just by making a behavior plan and putting together a social story.  Success occurs when everyone is on board to carry out the plan in a consistent manner and follow through with consequences.

Have these behaviors been extinguished?  The answer is no to that question, but they have been contained.  Nick attempted to pull a fire alarm out in the community last week, but failed.  At home, he drops and tries to throw his iPads, but not near as much.  I have to stay on him to make good choices and reward him with praise and elbow bumps when he does.  If he doesn’t make a good choice the iPads get locked up.

I think the fact that my son is open to making good choices and being more compliant, is a win in my book.  I find it hopeful, that Nick is learning new behaviors at age 24.  I will continue to strive on following through and reinforcing the desired behaviors that will help Nick be more respectful and compliant young adult.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

Posted in Adult Day Programs for Special Needs, Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Fun Side of Nick

DS-ASD Fall Update

DS-ASD Fall Update

fall pumpkins

Here’s what Nick’s been up to this fall.  My son is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD).  He attends an adult developmental training program each day.  The program keeps him busy with many enrichment activities and developmental learning skills are incorporated throughout the day.  Outside this program, Nick enjoys spending time with his personal support respite workers out in the community.

Some of the highlights of Nick’s day program are community trips, including shopping, museums, bowling and going out to eat.  In house, communication, functional living skills, recreation, music, movies, gardening, crafts and cooking are all a part of the curriculum.

Here are some of the fun things Nick’s been up to this fall outside the day program……

NIU Football Game, with Dad. Go Huskies!

NIU football game

Pumpkin Patch with Miss R….

Nick loves eating out and date nights with his personal support workers, Miss R, Jodi and Kelsey.  The look on his face says it all!  I think he’s got the “smizing” down, Tyra Banks 🙂

Here in Chicago, the fall weather was less than desirable.  But, there were a handful of mild, sunny days in the chilly mix. At least the Chicago Bears are playing some great football this season.

Go Bears!

Nick Bears Jersey

Nick is 24 years old, but I’ve noticed that he continues to gain new skills and behaviors which are both good and challenging.  I am always seeking new ways to support him to make good choices and curtail the undesirable behaviors, like button, fire alarm pushing, throwing and dropping things.  I am happy to report that some of these behaviors have started to diminish since adding in two new social stories.  Social stories are great tools to teach new skills and behaviors.  Next week, I will share more about these two stories, and how they have been implemented both at home and at his day program.  How’s that for a teaser? 🙂

Life has been good this fall, in Nick’s world, and the rest of us are just trying to keep up.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

Posted in Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #223~When It’s More Than Just Down Syndrome

Blog #223~When It’s More Than Just Down Syndrome

Parents of a child with Down syndrome will post questions online, about the possibility of their child also having autism.  Their questions are, what are the signs and symptoms, and also what is the benefit of having a secondary diagnosis of autism with the primary diagnosis of Down syndrome (DS-ASD)?  Having navigated the path of a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD for 24 years and working as a dual diagnosis specialist and consultant, I can attest to the benefits of getting the secondary diagnosis of autism along with Down syndrome.

Do you suspect that your child, student or client with Down syndrome may also have autism?  Learn about this:

*The signs and symptoms of DS-ASD

*The benefits getting an evaluation and secondary diagnosis of autism related with Down syndrome

*What additional services are available to support a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD

*Resources and support related to having a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD

Click here to learn find out: @https://nickspecialneeds.com/2016/09/12/blog-155more-than-just-down-syndrome/

Getting the secondary diagnosis of autism along with Down syndrome was the key to unlocking the door for more specialized training, communication and behavior support, funding and respite care for my son, Nick.  It also lead me to find support groups that are dealing with tough issues that are unique to children and adults with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.

magic key       down syndrome and autism intersect

Please feel free to share this blog post and any others that I’ve written.  My goal is to enlighten, educate and provide support for parents, families, professionals on navigating the path for children and adults, with special needs.  Message me if I can be of help, and be sure to check out our social media sites below.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice of Autism

Instagram @nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

Posted in Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #217~DS-ASD: Why the Autism Label Matters?

Blog #217~ DS-ASD: Why the Autism Label Matters?

Over the years I’ve read countless stories of parents struggling to get an autism evaluation and diagnosis for their child who has Down syndrome.  IEP (Individual Education Plan) teams often tell parents that, there is no need to get an autism label, because they already have a primary diagnosis of Down syndrome that they can work with.  A doctor may dismiss the idea because the child makes good eye contact, and is highly social.  This is my story as well with my son, Nick who is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD.  So, why does the autism label matter?

The book “When Down Syndrome and Autism Intersect, A Guide to DS-ASD Parents and Professionals” by Margaret Froehlke, and Robin Zaborek, states that:

“It’s only in  the past 10 to 20 years that we’ve learned that up to 18 percent of persons with Down syndrome will also have autism or ASD (autism spectrum disorder).  This is information that most healthcare professionals are not aware of and underscores the importance of this reference guide.”

Down syndrome and autism intersect2

Getting the secondary diagnosis of autism for an individual with Down syndrome will open up new doors for services to address the unique needs associated with DS-ASD.  For a parent, it validates what they have suspected for quite some time, and allows them to move forward to get services and support for their child.  Honestly, I was sad at first to receive the news of an autism diagnosis.  But eventually, I realized that this label explained the speech deficits, complex sensory, stimming and violent behaviors that Nick was exhibiting.  I rolled up my sleeves and sought help from the school IEP team and support groups to figure out how to help my son.  The secondary formal diagnosis of autism, enabled us to access the services from the district’s Autism Consultant.  This was the key to opening up new doors that helped in the areas of behavior and communication.

Behavior and communication go hand in hand.  As a child matures and approaches puberty, the behaviors can escalate to meltdowns that endanger themselves, family and school staff and peer students.  It is essential to determine the function of these behaviors and get a positive behavior support plan in place.  Evaluating the mode of communication is the second piece of the puzzle that must be addressed.  If a child is frustrated due to lack of speech or being non-verbal, they will often act out through their behaviors.  Individuals with DS-ASD may act out because they are trying to make sense of their world.  That is why a positive behavior support plan and mode of communication can enable a child to make their needs known, so they can get these wishes met.

autism-scrabble-letters-by-Jesper-Sehested

A BCBA Autism Consultant typically observes the child and takes data on behaviors by doing a Functional Behavior Analysis (FBA).  This detective work will uncover what is causing the behavior and lead to developing a behavior plan to support the child.

Frustrated icon   Detective-clipart-animation-free-images-2

Once the target behaviors have been identified, the Autism Consultant and IEP team members, along with the parents, can collaborate to find strategies to support the child.

For example if a child hits or pinches himself (Self-injurious behavior known as SIBS), or hurting others.  The Autism Consultant would determine possible causes and the setting in which it took place, and what the function of the behavior could be (avoidance, escape, boredom, etc..).  Possible antecedents might include:

*Diverted staff attention

*Unstructured/wait time

*Loud or crowded environment

*A change in activity to a non-preferred activity.

*Disrupted routine

*An object or activity is taken away

Supports can be put into place so that the child better understands what is expected.  A visual schedule, social stories, and communication mode (Picture Exchange Communication System knowns as PECS, or a higher tech, talker device) can be determined and put into place to allow the child to express their feelings, wants and needs.  The use of sensory diets and breaks, using noise cancelling headphones help the individual cope in stressful, crowded and loud environments, or regulation when the child is over or understimulated.

Providing behavior and communication support and strategies interventions for individuals with a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD will make a positive impact both at school and in the home setting.  In addition, the secondary diagnosis of autism opens up doors to more services and funding from state for respite care and behavior support at home. Having outside help with respite care, relieves the burden of stress on the family, and enables parents to continue to enjoy personal interests and taking a break outside the home.

Getting a proper and formal assessment and evaluation for a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism is a game changer.  Individuals with DS-ASD experience the world differently than just having Down syndrome or autism alone.  Intervention and support strategies can be targeted to the individual to specifically address behavior, communication and sensory needs for the child.  Finally, the second label of autism, will open up doors to support groups and additional funding for waivers that provide in home support and respite care for weary families like mine.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick on Social Media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #212~DS-ASD Behavior Management

Blog #212~DS-ASD Behavior Management

Behavior problems are common for individuals having a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  Speech deficits hinder a person’s ability to communicate wants and needs, leading to these challenging behavior problems.   As I’ve mentioned in previous blogs, every behavior even the bad ones, are an attempt to communicate something.  For the past 24 years, I have experienced this on the front lines with my son Nick, who has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  It’s important to get a clear picture of what is triggering the problem behavior.  To do this, try taking a step back and determine what is causing the behavior.

For individuals with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism, some challenging behaviors include property destruction (such as dropping, throwing, dumping things on the floor, and breaking objects).  Other behaviors might include elopement, dropping and plopping, stimming, yelling, repetitive movements and physical aggression to name a few.

There are 5 steps you can take to discover the causes of a problem behavior and prevent it from occurring.  It is important to mention here that, these steps should be taken with the support of a child’s IEP team and ideally using a Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA) with a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA).  It starts with doing a little detective work.

Detective-clipart-animation-free-images-2

1.What is the problem behavior, describe it?

2. Observe when the behavior occurs and when it doesn’t?  

3. Make a guess about what could be triggering the behavior and what might be reinforcing it.

4. Come up with a plan to prevent the behavior including supports that will help improve it in the future.

5. Track the behavior to see if the plan and supports are working.

Let’s put this into practice with the behavior of a child throwing, dropping, breaking and dumping out things around the house (property destruction):

1.”Billy” returns home from school and goes upstairs to his parents bedroom.  He turns on the water faucets full blast, and takes a photo frame and throws it down from the top of the stairwell where is shatters to pieces.

2. The behavior occurs after school, as his mom is unloading the backpack and reading the communication notebook.  It also occurs when paren’s attention are diverted, (doing chores, talking on the phone) and while the child has down time.

3. The antecedents are sensory seeking, lack of attention, unstructured down tome and boredom. Billy is reinforced by getting negative attention from his parents, who naturally get upset when something gets broken or a mess is made in the house.

4. The plan is for Billy to have a more structured routine during those down times when parents are busy working around the house:

-Create an afternoon visual schedule for Billy to put away the contents of his backpack and engage him in the chores with heavy work (a calming sensory activity).

-Replacement activities will include jumping on his mini trampoline, carrying laundry baskets to the washing machine and loading it, or vacuuming.

-Billy will be reinforced with high fives and praise, followed by a reward, upon completion of these replacement activities.  Rewards may include a choice of a favorite toy, iPad, movie, or snack.

-Billy will also be redirected to use his AAC device (talker) to express his needs.

-Parents are encouraged remain calm, matter of fact with little emotion, making minimal eye contact while using a soft voice, when the child engages property destruction.

5. Parent and teachers will keep a log to track this behavior both at home and in the school setting.

Sample ABC Chart used to do a Functional Behavior Analysis:

ABC chart

Before identifying the antecedent, behavior and consequence on the ABC chart, it is important to look at the setting prior to when the behavior occurred.  Note any changes in medications.  Is the child sleepy, overheated or too cold?  Are there any disruptions in staff or transportation to and from school? Is the environment to noisy or quiet?  These factors can all play a part in causing behavior problems.

The best behavior plans have proactive strategies and supports to encourage good behavior.  In my experience, the behavior plan must be revisited several times a year and tweaked accordingly, to support positive behavior in a child with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  The key to behavior management is to step back and do the detective work, and come up with a plan to cut these behaviors off at the pass.  Working with the IEP team and a certified BCBA behaviorist to develop a behavior plan will lead to better responding thoughtfully to what the child is trying to communicate in their wants and needs.

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Parenting Special Needs

Blog #208~Vacation Tips for Parents of a Child With Special Needs

Blog #208~Vacation Tips for Parents of a Child With Special Needs

summer sand

Are you a parent of a child with special needs, that will be going on vacation soon?  If so, then this blog is for you.  It can be a lot of work ahead of time getting ready for a trip.  But it is well worth it to be prepared and have a plan in place to help your child feel more relaxed and secure.

Here are 7 Vacation Tips for Parents of a Child with Special Needs:

1. Prepare social stories and visual schedules including the mode of travel, and what is expected from your child.  Review the vacation destination venue online with your child.  This will give them an idea of where they will be going, and what they will be doing.  Print pictures of the vacation venue to create a daily activity schedule.  Visuals will provide a blueprint for your child to understand what will be happening, this will lessen their anxiety.

flying visuals

2. When booking accommodations, look for a comfortable and quiet retreat for your family.  This may mean a separate living area from the rest of your family or friends in some cases.

3. Bring medications, snacks, comfort items and highly preferred toys/sensory objects in your carry on bag.  In addition, it’s wise to pack an extra set of clothes for your child.

4. Plan short, flexible and open-ended adventures on your vacation.  Build in time for breaks as needed.

5. Work in at least a few activities that your child will love.

6. Eating familiar foods will help your child feel more at home in a strange place.  Check resturaunt menus online beforehand, especially in the case of any food allergies or dietary restrictions.  Don’t underestimate the importance of this.  Once on vacation, we forgot to buy Ranch dressing, this lead to my son having a meltdown.

7. Don’t beat yourself up if things don’t go as planned.  As much as you can, try to watch for the triggers that may cause your child to have a meltdown.  See what you can do to cut these off at the pass before things escalate.

My son Nick is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  There are definite triggers that can lead to him having a meltdown.  Besides the Ranch dressing incident, we’ve experienced several instances where heat has caused him to lose his cool.  On two different family reunions, Nick got upset waiting in the heat for the family group pictures to be taken.  Another occasion was a city tour on a 90+ degree day. We pushed the envelope too far, trying to walk back to the car, which was a good 10 blocks away.  Nick wanted no part of it.  He got very upset and it quickly escalated to a meltdown.  In retrospect, I should have asked a family member to get the car to us.

Hot Spring, AR was extra hot that day.  Nobody is happy here…….

004

When meltdowns happen, get your child to a safe spot and allow them to recover fully.  Reassure your child that he is loved and safe.  Most important as a parent, remain calm in these situations.  Afterwards review with your family what the antecedents were, that led to the behavior.  Learn from these, so you can avoid and control them in the future.

Vacations while fun, can be challenging for a child with special needs.  Prepare in advance with comfort items, visuals, and look for possible triggers that may cause anxiety and discomfort for your child.  Build in as much predictability as possible.  Keep a relaxed and flexible attitude when approaching daily activities.  It’s okay to cut things short, if it gets to be too much.  Have a great summer, and don’t forget to pack the sunscreen!  I’ll be sure to pick up some Ranch dressing too.

sunshine

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall