Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #200~World Down Syndrome Day

Blog #200~World Down Syndrome Day

“World Down Syndrome Day is Wednesday, March 21, 2018 and its purpose is to raise awareness around the world of what Down syndrome is and the vital role people with Down syndrome play in our society. The day has been officially observed by the United Nations since 2012 and the date — always on the 21st day of the 3rd month — is meant to highlight the uniqueness of the triplication (trisomy) of the 21st chromosome, which is the cause of Down syndrome.”

World Down-Syndrome-Day

World Down Syndrome Day is an opportunity for all of us to promote awareness, understanding and inclusion.  Lack of knowledge and understanding can prevent people with Down syndrome from being accepted and included in society.  The message is simple, every individual is unique, we all have value, and everyone has the right to live a happy and fulfilling life.  I heard a great quote the other day, “Down syndrome is just another way that humanity presents itself”.  


So, how can we promote awareness, understanding, inclusion and acceptance? 

Three Easy Ways To Promote World Down Syndrome Day:

1. Promote Down syndrome awareness on social media.  Rock your funky socks and T-shirts.  Let’s see them on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.  Share inspiring, beautiful pictures, stories and videos of individuals with Down syndrome.  Tell us how an individual with Down syndrome has affected your life. Use hashtags, here are a few suggestions-  #wdsd #downsyndrome #321 #abilities #inclusion #funkysocks #downsyndromerocks #PROVETHEMWRONG

Nick Prove Them Wrong

My son Nick (pictured above) is 24 years old, and has Down syndrome and autism.  We’ve joined Noah’s Dad-Down syndrome awareness in their campaign #PROVETHEMWRONG.  More information at

2. Educate others about Down syndrome and encourage the use of person first language.  This means saying, “a person or individual with Down syndrome”.

Do NOT say:
* “A Down syndrome baby, child or kid.”
* “Down’s baby, child or kid”
* “Down’s”
* “He or she has Downs”

3. Encourage inclusion in your community.  What opportunities are available for meaningful jobs, volunteer work and other contributions for individuals with Down syndrome?  Are there any fundraisers like the Buddy Walk, funky sock campaign or other local DS support group activities, that you could get involved in?  Adults teens and children can volunteer to help with programs like the Special Olympics, Best Buddies peer program, and GiGi’s Playhouse.

Nick volunteering at GiGi’s Playhouse…..


Here’s an amazing business:  Bitty & Beau’s Coffee is more than just a place to grab a cup of coffee – it’s an experience. While the shop is run by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and the customers love the products, they really come in for the unique customer service experience……..

bitty and beau coffee shop

Promoting awareness on social media, educating others about Down syndrome to use person first language, and finding inclusion opportunities are three great ways you can  support World Down Syndrome Day 3/21/18!  Help others to gain a better understanding, acceptance and inclusion for individuals with Down syndrome.  Let’s look past the diagnosis and see the uniqueness of each individual and their vital role to our society.  I can’t wait to see your posts on social media and rocking those funky socks for WDSD 2018!

We Help Two funky socks available at ………

That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick on Social Media:

 Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism 

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall











Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Down Syndrome Awareness, Spread the Word!

Down Syndrome Awareness, Spread the Word!

March is a significant month for raising awareness and acceptance for individuals with Down syndrome and other intellectual and developmental disabilities.  It is time that we as a society, do something to change the way people refer to individuals with special needs.  There are several campaigns and events this month, that I want to highlight!

spread the word 2018

“Spread the Word to End the Word is an ongoing effort to raise the consciousness of society about the dehumanizing and hurtful effects of the word “retard(ed)” and encourage people to pledge to stop using the R-word. The campaign is intended to get schools, communities and organizations to rally and pledge their support to help create communities of inclusion and acceptance for all people. Most people don’t think of this word as hate speech, but that’s exactly what it feels like to millions of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, their families and friends. What started as a youth-led grassroots effort in 2009 by a small group of students with one simple call to action, has evolved to communities across the world not only taking the pledge, but challenging others to talk, think and write with respect.”

Click here and pledge to Spread the Word to End the Word:

spread the word tee shirt


Be sure and mark your calendar for March 21st, World Down Syndrome Day!

World Down-Syndrome-Day

“World Down Syndrome Day creates a single global voice for advocating for the rights, inclusion and well-being of people with Down syndrome.  The mission is to promote awareness and understanding, seek international support, and to achieve dignity, equal rights and a better life for people with Down syndrome everywhere. The date for WDSD being the 21st day of the 3rd month, was selected to signify the uniqueness of the triplication (trisomy) of the 21st chromosome which causes Down syndrome.

Click here for more information about WDSD:

One of the trademarks of World Down Syndrome Day is rocking your fun, brightly colored, funky socks.  Last year I partnered with We Help Two for a fundraiser and awareness campaign.  Portions of the proceeds went to our local Down syndrome support group, the National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS)  In addition, for every pair of socks sold, We Help Two gives a pair of thermal socks to donate to a local homeless shelter.


Last year, my son Nick and I raised over $500 for NADS and donated 59 pair of thermal socks to The Hessed House, a local homeless shelter.  The campaign was super easy to set up and promote on social media, with minimal time as the host.

Nick and I donating We Help Two thermal socks to the Hessed House……….

Nick and Mom at Hessed House 2

To order or host your own Rock your Funky Socks for WDSD click here:

Order socks to directly benefit NADS fundraiser click here:

Check out the brand new styles offered this year, by We Help Two :)………



One more campaign I want to showcase is led by Noah’s Dad, called #Prove Them Wrong. 

“It’s awesome to see so many people with special needs proving to the world that what it may think about them is wrong! We see so many of your children are doing awesome things as well! We want to invite you to be a part of a fun new campaign we’re doing called the #PROVETHEMWRONG campaign and show the world how your children are doing that! I’m going to be making a video for World Down Syndrome Day and I want you / your family in it!” -Noah’s Dad


For more information about #PROVETHEMWRONG click here:

Our dream as a community of advocates for those living with intellectual and developmental disabilities, is to live in a world where everyone feels respected, loved accepted and appreciated.  Let’s get out there and spread the word this month and make a difference for the future!

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick on Social Media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall












Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness

Blog #196~Netflix Comedy Special “Disgraceful”

Blog #196~ Netflix Comedy Special “Disgraceful”

The Netflix comedy special, “Disgraceful” by Tom Segura has recently sparked outrage in the Down syndrome community.  The comedian, known for pushing the boundaries, talked about how you can’t use the words, “that is retarded” anymore.  In this act, he takes it a step further by suggesting that it be replaced with the term, “extra 21st chromosome,” directly mocking people with Down syndrome.  The words used in this program are wrong, offensive and by definition hate speech.  I wouldn’t be doing my job as Nick’s mother if I didn’t advocate for my son, and other individuals having Down syndrome.

To view the full transcript of this piece along with how the Down syndrome community and leading support groups are responding click here:

Netflix is promoting this special, “Disgraceful” by claiming this comedian “gives voice to the sordid thoughts you never say out loud”.  So it appears that these “sordid thoughts” about people having Down syndrome are fair game.  We live in a country where there is freedom of speech, and certainly comedians push boundaries all the time.  But it is extremely hurtful and offensive to make a joke at the expense of people like my son, and other individuals who have Down syndrome. has a petition that calls for Netflix to:

*Remove the anti-down syndrome rhetoric from the show.

*Take the anti-disability sketch out of the trailer for the show.

*Issue a public apology for perpetuating hate speech and stereotype to the Down syndrome community.

take it down netflix

To sign the petition click here:

If you have a Netflix account you can also give “comedian” Tom Segura a thumbs down.

Using the R-word and mocking individuals who have Down syndrome is NOT funny, in fact it’s disgraceful.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.









Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Government/Legal Matters Related to Special Needs, IEP (Indivdualized Education Plan)

Blog #195~ Being a Firestarter

Blog #195~ Being a Firestarter

What is the difference between those bold enough to pursue their dreams and others who never get comfortable enough to ignite their lives? The doers are “Firestarters” and, because of them, the world is a much different, and often, better place.


Are you looking for a way to ignite your life and dreams?  Firestarters-How Innovators, Instigators and Initiators Can Inspire You To Ignite Your Own Life,  is a new book released last week; that will help you to do so. As I wrote in last week’s Blog #194, Firestarters are innovators, instigators and initiators that get things accomplished.  Recently I had the opportunity to interview one of the co-authors of this new and powerful book, Paul Eder along with a featured Firestarter, David Egan who is an advocate for special needs.  This week, I am sharing more on these interviews about being FIRESTARTERS!


David Egan is the first person with an intellectual disability to be awarded a Joseph P. Kennedy JR. Public Policy Fellowship, he made history by working on Capitol Hill with the Ways and Means Social Security Subcommittee.  David Egan, born with Down syndrome, is a trailblazer for others who have intellectual disabilities.

David Egan-Advocate Photo

He believes in promoting the idea of people with disabilities having special talents.  David states that people with intellectual disabilities should be included in as many sectors of our society as possible, and being featured as a leader in this book makes made him proud.  The most important part of his advocacy is to demonstrate that people like himself are Valued, Able, and Ready to work.

David Egan Work Photo         David Egan swimming

“We are citizens that matter and we belong in our community.” -David Egan


“People with intellectual disabilities do not want pity; we want respect, inclusion, and the opportunity to reach our full potential like any other citizen.” -David Egan

Paul Eder is the co-author of Firestarters along with Raoul Davis JR. and Kathy Palokoff.  From early on, Paul Eder wanted the book to be inclusive.  He has a 6-year old son, Brady who has Down syndrome and believes his potential is limitless.  Paul says that a Firestarter is partially defined by the impact you have on others. His son, Brady has certainly impacted his life.  Paul hopes his son’s achievements go beyond and push the boundaries like David Egan.

I asked Paul how he plans to use the concept of Firestarters to help navigate his son through school and working with IEP team members? 

Paul said that, “The IEP (Individualized Education Plan),  generally taps into a number of the concepts we discuss in the Firestarters book, but the section on Accelerants is very relevant. Accelerants include: Mission-focused behavior, Cooperation, Constructive competition, sweat equity (working hard), and support seeking.”

Paul goes on to further state this about IEP’s:

“An IEP certainly focuses on the mission surrounding your child’s educational path. From a cooperation perspective, the IEP defies all the supporting partnerships that are necessary to propel his success.  All of the IEP goals are measurable, which gives it a competitive flair. We want the goals to be challenging but not impossible, and we want to be able to compare his progress against some standard of success (e.g., grade-level expectations). My son has a daily behavior log where his social and academic behaviors are tracked. From this sheet, we are able to tell whether he is putting in his full effort and devoting the sweat equity needed to learn. Support-seeking is an obvious one.”

“The IEP team is a support structure in itself.  As parents, we can’t be afraid to ask the questions needed of the team and push for the supports required to ensure his success.” -Paul Eder

I asked Paul how can someone support the Firestarters in their lives, especially those with potential but who may have special needs?

In the book we define 4 types of supporters based on the research we conducted:

1.Nurturers listen and help you follow through with your ideas.
2.Motivators get you moving. They are people like Tony Robbins who exude an energy that make you want to be a better person.
3.Illuminators are the teachers in your life who help you grow socially and intellectually.
4.Protectors are the people who defend you when others won’t.

A FIRESTARTER, seeks support to fan their flame, and finds ways to limit the influence of Extinguishers.

As we begin 2018, what do you want to accomplish?  Find the people who can support you and don’t allow the extinguishers to have power over your life.  We’ve all met FIRESTARTERS, and seen what they’ve accomplished.  They create, disrupt and start things.  The book FIRESTARTERS  interviewed successful entrepreneurs, CEO’s, organizational leaders, advocates and forward thinkers from a variety of professions to find out what makes them tick.  There are step by step guides to teach you how to join the ranks in whatever you want to accomplish.

For more information about FIRESTARTERS click here:

Thank you to Paul Eder and David Egan for sharing your inspiring stories of being FIRESTARTERS, who make the world a better place!  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂 





Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Government/Legal Matters Related to Special Needs

Blog #194~ Firestarters

Blog #194~ Firestarters

What is the difference between those bold enough to pursue their dreams and others who never get comfortable enough to ignite their lives? The doers are “Firestarters” and, because of them, the world is a much different, and often, better place.

Recently, one of the co-authors of a new and powerfully motivating book, Paul Eder reached out to me to do an exclusive interview about Firestarters- How Innovators, Instigators and Initiators Can Inspire You To Ignite Your Life.


There is a big difference between people who MAKE things happen and those who only THINK about making an impact.  So many people have dreams, yet few are willing to take action.  The authors of Firestarters set out to find the “secret sauce” providing pragmatic advice for readers to ignite the qualities from successful entrepreneurs, CEO’s, organizational leaders, advocates and forward thinkers from a variety of professions.  Co-Authors Raoul Davis JR., Kathy Palokoff and Paul Eder did extensive research interviewing and studying hundreds of people who have all been a catalyst for change.

In my interview with co-author Paul Eder, he states that a Firestarter is someone who makes an impact, someone who presses forward in the face of challenges that would cause others to run the other way.

There are 3 types of Firestarters in the book:

*Innovators create things.

*Instigators disrupt things.

*Initiators start things.

All three types are bonded together by the great impact they have on other people and the world by creating, disrupting and starting things.  So, how do you know if you’re an Innovator, Instigator, or an Initiator?  The book provides a quiz that you can take, but the short answer is to investigate both what motivates you and how you interact with others.

*Do you like to explore new ideas for the sake of exploring them? Do you come up with your own pet theories of how the world works? You may be an Innovator.

*Do others always call you out for debating too much? Do you strive to be different and do things in a way no one has done? You may an Instigator.

*Are you constantly moving? Do you have the energy of 10 thoroughbreds and need to sleep only 4 hours a night to be fully effective? You may be an Initiator.

Firestarters aren’t constrained to one type. Different situations may require you to act more like an Innovator. Others require you to be an Initiator and just get things done. Firestarters are amazing in that they are flexible to tap into all three types as needed – when most people would be more likely to stick to their default type, according to Paul.

From early on, Paul Eder wanted the book to be inclusive. He has a 6-year old son, Brady who has Down syndrome and believes his potential is limitless.  The Firestarters concept  applies to CEOs of mega corporations as well as PTA moms. There are interviews John Sculley, a former CEO of Apple and present his profile at a similar level of prominence of David Egan, who has Down syndrome and is a self-advocate who has single-handedly re-defined the perceived capabilities of people with intellectual disabilities.

David Egan is the first person with an intellectual disability to be awarded a Joseph P. Kennedy JR. Public Policy Fellowship, he made history by working on Capitol Hill with the Ways and Means Social Security Subcommittee.


In my interview with David Egan, he showed great passion about being an advocate with an ongoing commitment that never ends. His dream is to help people with intellectual disabilities.  All of his jobs and activities have been very important. However, being  selected as the first person with intellectual disabilities to serve as a JP Kennedy JR. Public Policy fellow was an honor and a breakthrough.  Previous fellows were doctors, professors, parents, educators or with physical disabilities but David made history and is proud to follow in the vision of Eunice Shriver, the founder of Special Olympics. She believed that we belong and we have the same rights as any other citizen.

Paul Eder feels his 6-year old son Brady, who has Down syndrome will follow the path forged by David Egan, in not allowing a label to define his future. A diagnosis is not a destiny.  Down syndrome isn’t a determinant of his son’s potential.  This is a powerful message on never setting limits!  This message has resonated with me for the past 23 years in raising my son, Nick- who has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.

Next week, I will share more of my interviews with Paul and David with their great insights on being a Firestarter.  Here is a review of this book from Forbes magazine:  If you are looking for a way to set your goals in motion and take action for 2018, I highly suggest reading Firestarters!  

This book will be released tomorrow, January 9th, click here to learn more:


Is this the year you are going to MAKE things happen, or just think about it?  What things or people threaten to extinguish your fire?  Set your goals and be a Firestarter, that’s what is in my noggin this week.








Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs

Blog #189~Buddy Up Tennis

Blog #189~Buddy Up Tennis

Buddy Up Tennis Logo

I had the pleasure of observing the Buddy Up Tennis program over the past weekend. Buddy Up Tennis is a high-energy, adaptive tennis and fitness program for children and young adults with Down syndrome.  They provide fun and rewarding 90-minute clinics on a weekly basis.  The program currently serves 550 individuals ages five to young adults with Down syndrome across the country.

The program I visited was Buddy Up Tennis Naperville in Illinois, located at Five Star Tennis Center.  Athletes are divided into 3 groups according to age and ability.  They kick off the morning with a warmup and fitness component.  Each participant is paired with a volunteer buddy.  Everyone gets a chance to throw the dice and perform a variety of exercises together like toe touches, arm circles, sit-ups, jumping jacks and push-ups.

fitness dice

After the warm-up and calisthenics, the participants move to circuit training.  Stations are set up focus on balance, agility, hand-eye coordination and upper body movements that mimic tennis strokes and serves.

Balance Work Stations…..

Buddy Up Balance

The tennis serve motion is mimicked by throwing a football through the hoops.  Balls are thrown from the hip on both sides of the body into a basket to work on the forehand and backhand movements……

Buddy Up Hoops

Other stations include using an agility ladder, cones, balance beam and tug of war.  All of these work on each component of fitness, as related to playing tennis.

Following the fitness segment, the groups work on tennis strokes and games.  The younger players used smaller nets and foam transition balls which are easier to hit.


The player’s ages 10 and up, worked on forehand and backhand volleys.  Coaches use the cues,  “Squash the bug”, No swinging” and “High five it” to teach proper form on volleys.  The athletes had fun trying to win a prize by hitting a target on the court.  After volleys, the group worked on overheads, with the coaches using cues like, “Point the left arm to the ball, and hit the ball at the highest point”.

It was wonderful to see the players working hard and enjoying the experience with their fellow teammates, buddies, and coaches.  The staff and volunteers were so encouraging and positive.  There were lots of high fives, smiles, cheering and laughter.  Buddy Up Tennis helps players build fitness, tennis skills, friendships, and cooperation.  These life skills are valuable both on and off the court.

For more information about Buddy Up Tennis visit their website:

tennis racket

I highly recommend this program and look forward to taking my son, Nick next week.  That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall




Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness

Blog #188~Down syndrome Awareness Month-5 Takeaways

Blog #188~Down syndrome Awareness Month-5 Takeaways


As October and Down syndrome Awareness Month, comes to an end, I want to leave you with 5 things takeaways to keep in mind, and share with others about Down syndrome!

1. Babies with Down syndrome have low muscle tone (know as Hypotonia).  This effects motor and oral motor development.  It will take them a little longer to talk, walk, and eat the same foods as others.  Early intervention with physical, occupational and speech therapy play a big part in growth and progress in these milestones.

2. People with Down syndrome aren’t ‘always happy’.  They have feelings just like everyone else.

3. People with Down syndrome will share some common features.  A few of these include low muscle tone, smaller in stature, almond-shaped eyes, tiny white (Brushfield) spots in the iris, a crease running in the palm of their hand, a gap between big and second toe.  But they will more closely resemble their immediate family members.

My son, Nick has low muscle tone.  We propped him in the high chair supported by pillows…..


4. People with Down syndrome can’t be ”more Downs’ than another.  As with everyone else, each person with Down syndrome has their own strengths, weaknesses, talents and abilities.

Nick loves swimming and even tried scuba diving.  He also has many jobs both at home and in his adult day program he attends……..

Diveheart 2013 336     Nick cleaning GiGi's

5. Please use ‘people first’ language, a person has or with Down syndrome. NOT a Down’s child or the Down syndrome kid. Down syndrome does not define who they are!

Actor and advocate, Chris Burke…..

Chris Burke quote

Spreading awareness and information helps others to become more understanding and accepting of individuals with Down syndrome, and their contributions to society.  That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall


Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness

Blog #187~Artist With Down syndrome Captures Amazing Images

Blog #187~Artist With Down syndrome Captures Amazing Images

Geoffrey Mikol

I had the pleasure of meeting Geoffrey Mikol, who is a professional artist, over the past weekend.  Geoffrey owns River Bend Gallery, which is located in Galena, Illinois.  He is 23 years old and as a person born with Down syndrome, Geoffrey has a natural talent of capturing images in nature.  He studied photography since high school, and his fine artwork is incredible.  What draws your eye to his work, is how he captures the light and beauty uniquely in each piece.

Geoffrey Mikol, artist:

Geoffrey Mikol picture

Geoffrey warmly greets everyone outside his gallery and his work speaks for itself.  He is an award-winning photographer who started selling his work 10 years ago, in the Chicagoland area.

River Bend Gallery

Visiting River Bend Gallery and meeting Geoffrey and his family was a real highlight to the Galena trip.  You can feel the serenity in his work and a warmth when you enter River Bend Gallery.

To view more images click here- and follow on Facebook at River Bend Gallery.  There are prints, calendars, coaster sets and greeting cards available for purchase.  They would be great Christmas gifts for family, friends, teachers, aids and therapists.

That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa 🙂


Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Education and Special Needs

Blog #186~Down syndrome:How to Promote Inclusiveness in School

Blog #186~Down syndrome: How to Promote Inclusiveness in School

DSAwarenessMagnet     Peer Partners

October is Down syndrome Awareness Month.  This is an ideal time to promote inclusiveness in your child’s school.  Forming a partnership with your child’s education team is the key to a successful inclusion experience.

Here are a few resources and suggestions on how to advocate for inclusion in your child’s school environment and classroom:

*Send an “All About Me” introduction about your child to the teacher.  There are many ideas, templates and apps that are available online.  This is especially helpful, if your child’s speech is limited or non-verbal.

all about me app

*Share inclusion resources with your child’s teacher:

  • Meaningful Inclusion for Students With Down Syndrome: A Resource for Elementary Educators.
  • The Inclusive Class:
  • Inclusion in the Classroom-Tips and Resources:
  • Donate books to the library and classroom:               I can Can you  Paint the Octopus Red  My Friend has DS

*Topics on Down Syndrome, that are helpful for teaching from Woodbine House Publishing:  Books related to Down syndrome are ON SALE during the month of October!

Whole Child Reading         Down syndrome and autism intersect2      Teaching Math to DS        fine motor skills and DS

Working with the school team to promote an understanding about Down syndrome, and a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism has many benefits.  It will help students in general education classes feel less anxious and reduce misconceptions they may have had.  Building this bridge together, will lead to a meaningful learning experience for everyone in the school.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook & Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instgram@ #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall






Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month

October is Down syndrome Awareness Month


October is Down syndrome Awareness Month.  I’ve had the privilege of raising my son,  for the past 23 years.  Nick has Down syndrome and autism. He has touched my life, and those of so many others along the way.


Down syndrome awareness is about promoting acceptance and inclusion of all individuals with Down syndrome.

FACTS about Down syndrome from National Down Syndrome Society (NDSS):

*Down syndrome occurs when an individual has a full or partial extra copy of chromosome 21. This additional genetic material alters the course of development and causes the characteristics associated with Down syndrome.

*There are three types of Down syndrome: trisomy 21 (nondisjunction) accounts for 95 percent of cases, translocation accounts for about 4 percent and mosaicism accounts for about 1 percent.

*Down syndrome is the most commonly occurring chromosomal condition. One in every 691 babies in the United States is born with Down syndrome.

*There are more than 400,000 people living with Down syndrome in the United States.

*Down syndrome occurs in people of all races and economic levels.

*The incidence of births of children with Down syndrome increases with the age of the mother. But due to higher fertility rates in younger women, 80 percent of children with Down syndrome are born to women younger than 35.

*People with Down syndrome have an increased risk for certain medical conditions such as congenital heart defects, respiratory and hearing problems, Alzheimer’s disease, childhood leukemia and thyroid conditions. Many of these conditions are now treatable, so most people with Down syndrome lead healthy lives.

*A few of the common physical traits of Down syndrome are low muscle tone, small stature, an upward slant to the eyes and a single deep crease across the center of the palm. Every person with Down syndrome is a unique individual and may possess these characteristics to different degrees or not at all.

*Life expectancy for people with Down syndrome has increased dramatically in recent decades — from 25 years old in 1983 to 60 years old today.

*People with Down syndrome attend school, work and participate in decisions that affect them, and contribute to society in many wonderful ways.

*All people with Down syndrome experience cognitive delays, but the effect is usually mild to moderate and is not indicative of the many strengths and talents that each individual possesses.

*Quality educational programs, a stimulating home environment, good health care and positive support from family, friends and the community enable people with Down syndrome to develop their full potential and lead fulfilling lives.

More information @


Here are a few simple ways to promote Down syndrome awareness:

*Post something about Down syndrome on social media

*Send updates, pictures and tell your story to your family doctor and OB-gyn.

*Many local Down syndrome support groups have promotional materials, like books and bookmarks that can be distributed at libraries and schools.

*Many local DS support groups have public speakers who can talk to schools, businesses, community groups, hospitals, and other organizations.

*Support or volunteer for local fundraisers like the Buddy Walk in your community @

*Encourage your kids to volunteer for Special Olympics and Best Buddies programs through their school.

Down syndrome journey

Thank you for supporting Down syndrome awareness this month!  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂