Posted in Adult Day Programs for Special Needs, Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs

DS-ASD~Fall Update 2019

DS-ASD~Fall Update 2019

Happy first day of fall 🙂! Here is an update on my son, Nick who is 25 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD). My son attends an adult developmental training day program which he enjoys very much. The program has a nice variety of learning and enrichment activities incorporated throughout the day. Outside this program, Nick enjoys spending time with his personal support respite workers in the community going out to eat, movies, parks and other activities.

Some of the highlights of Nick’s day program are community trips, including shopping, visits to parks and local amusements along with going out to eat. In house, the curriculum includes learning centers, communication, functional living skills, recreation, music, movies, gardening, crafts, cooking, Friday fun days and other themes round out this program each week.

Here are a few pictures of Nick at his adult developmental training program:

nick sweeping keeler      Nick nature walk keeler     Nick visor keeler      Nick learning centers keeler

nick connect game

On 9/11 the clients at his program made thank you cards for local first responders. Here’s Nick giving cards to a police officer:

Nick and APD

Nick’s verbal skills are limited, due to having the additional diagnosis of autism and verbal apraxia of speech along with Down syndrome. He uses an Augmentative and Alternative (AAC) device and picture exchange system (PECS) to communicate his needs. There are two ways that I know that he likes going to his day program. Over the weekend, he packed his lunch and put it in his backpack, which he set by the front door. He also took the school icon out of his PECS book and puts it on a Velcro task strip and handed it to me. It’s nice to see how much he wants to go to this program. The routine and structure helps individuals with Down syndrome, autism and other intellectual and developmental disabilities navigate their days successfully.

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick and see more pictures of him in action, along with other stories:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram @nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

Posted in Adult Day Programs for Special Needs, Autism, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Autism Awareness Month: Final Thoughts

Autism Awareness Month: Final Thoughts

autism awareness 2016

April is Autism Awareness Month, and I’ve written all month how awareness is not enough. Individuals with autism and their families need understanding, acceptance and inclusion in society. Individuals on the autism spectrum (ASD) need various levels of support to become as independent as possible. This type of support can’t be provided without funding.

Here’s a sobering fact- “In the documentary, Autism: Coming of age it is reported that in the next 10 to 15 years, an estimated 800,000 children with autism will age out of the school system and transition into adulthood. Then, they will look to ill-prepared state and federal governments for the support services and resources to meet their many needs — a situation autism experts refer to as the “coming tsunami.

tsunami

Slapping an autism awareness ribbon on a car, isn’t enough anymore. Individuals with autism need various levels of support, and a person centered planning (PCP) to prepare for adult life.

person centered planning

“Wikipedia defines person-centered planning (PCP) as a set of approaches designed to assist an individual to plan their life and supports. It is most often used for life planning with people with learning and developmental disabilities, though recently it has been advocated as a method of planning personalized support with many other sections of society who find themselves disempowered by traditional methods of service delivery, including children, people with physical disabilities, people with mental health issues and older people. PCP is accepted as evidence based practice in many countries throughout the world.”

Person Centered Planning (PCP) is individualized. It can help identify opportunities for employment, community participation/enrichment activities and living arrangements for adult life.  PCP can be done with the school IEP team, to prepare the student for a bright future based on their strengths and needs.

Autism is not going anywhere, the wave is coming in hard. There is a staggering amount of families on waiting lists for state funding who are aging out of the school system. My son Nick is 25 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD). He required a high level of support. Currently, Nick attends an adult developmental training program that is covered by funds through a state waiver. All across the country thousands of families are on long waiting lists, to seek such funds to support their child with autism and other intellectual and developmental disabilities. The conversation to advocate for individuals with autism must continue well past April before that tsunami wave hits the shore!

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa

Follow Nick on Social Media:
Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism Check 4/27 Facebook post to watch the documentary, Autism: Coming of Age
Instagram @nickdsautism
Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Adult Day Programs for Special Needs, Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

DS-ASD~Teaching Job and Functional Living Skills

DS-ASD~Teaching Job and Functional Living Skills

There are many jobs and functional living skills that can be taught to individuals who have a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD).  My son Nick is 25 years old and has several jobs both at home and in his adult developmental training day program.

Nick working at his day program….

Nick cleaning aid

Nick helping out at home…

Nick vacumme thanksgiving

One of the keys to unlocking your child’s potential, is to look at their interests and strengths.  Figure out what motivates them, and build jobs around those areas.  To read how to teach job and functional living skills click on the link below:

https://nickspecialneeds.com/2017/07/31/blog-179down-syndrome-and-autism-unlocking-your-childs-potential/

It’s never to early to start teaching job and functional living skills.  Start small and build around the interests and strengths of the individual.  Include lots of praise and rewards.  These skills will help to develop confidence and independence.

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

nick-senior-alarm-pic

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

Posted in Adult Day Programs for Special Needs, Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs

Blog #229~DS-ASD Winter Update

Blog #229~DS-ASD Winter Update

Chicago winter 2019

This winter weather has been bitter and harsh, here in Chicago.  Fortunately, we missed the plummeting temperatures last week, while vacationing in Vail, Colorado.  My son, Nick is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD).  Here’s an update on what Nick’s been up to this winter and the highlights of our trip to Vail.

The weather in Vail was mild, with temperatures in the 35-40 degree range and plenty of sunshine.  There is something to be said about sunlight and how it can elevate your mood.  The clear blue skies, warm sun, fresh air, and beautiful mountain views, can do wonders for the soul.

Vail sunset 2019

Nick enjoyed his time with our friends in Vail.  The village is always a fun place to visit.  Here’s Nick at lunch and with his Dad, Al :)…..

 

The highlight of the week, for Nick was dog sledding.  This is the second year we’ve done this with Mountain Mushers, who offer the best dog sledding rides in the Vail Valley.  Nick was happy to see his buddy, Cameron who was our dog sled musher last year.  He always gets such a kick seeing all the happy dogs, who bark with excitement as the sleds loaded up.

All bundled up in the sled and ready to go, and guess what, he actually kept his hat and gloves on this time.  Yay Nick! 🙂

 

The scenic trail was packed with alot more snow this year, making the ride faster. His favorite part is when the sled goes over the bumps and flies down the hills. Nick is a thrill seeker, who always signs “more” when a roller coaster ride is over.  He also loves the Disney movie Snow Dogs, so this was a perfect blend of his favorite things.  Towards the end of the ride, his Dad got to try his hand at mushing.  Check out the Facebook, Instagram and Twitter links below to see videos of them dog sledding in action all this week. 🙂 

Today it’s a balmy 50 degrees here in Chicago, and Nick has returned to his adult developmental training day program.  It’s hard to believe the turn around in temperatures……

Chicago temp difference

As I’ve mentioned in previous blog posts, Nick attends a day program that he truly enjoys.  The adult developmental training program curriculum includes functional and academic work activities, crafts, exercise, cooking, entertainment, and community outings.  The staff reports that Nick has so much potential and does awesome at the learning centers and work choices.  They have a lot of fun, especially over the holidays. Activities included a big Christmas lunch, wearing ugly sweaters, listening to a local high school choir and making wreaths, gingerbread houses and pillows.

Here’ s a no sew pillow that Nick made…..

nick pillow

If you look closely in the picture above, you might notice a stop icon on the dishwasher.  There are many of these stop signs on the start buttons around our house.  Individuals with a diagnosis of autism can benefit from the use of icons, to better guide their days.  Nick has a thing for pushing buttons and fire alarms.  His behavior support plan (BSP) addresses the fire alarm pulling.  Twice each day, the staff at his day program take him on a walk down the hallways.  They encourage and cue him to “keep walking” with “hands to self”.  Before these walks, the staff reads his social story that contains pictures of how to  navigate these hall walks.  Upon successful completion, Nick earns a reward.

Click on this link to learn more about the BSP and his social story: https://nickspecialneeds.com/tag/social-stories/

That wraps up Nick’s world and what he’s been up to this winter.  Navigating a dual diagnosis of  DS-ASD has it’s good and bad days.  Fortunately, the good days now outweigh the bad.  I think it’s both maturity on Nick’s part, along with the wisdom and understanding gained from being his parent.  Big guy has a milestone birthday coming up, I look forward to sharing more with you next Monday!  What is one thing that Nick has taught you over the past 24+ years?  I’d love to hear your feedback. 🙂

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 

Follow Nick on Social Media to see more pics and videos:

Nick head shot in vail

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism and more on dog sledding #mountainmushers

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Adult Day Programs for Special Needs, Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #224~Using Social Stories for Behavior Management

Blog #224~Using Social Stories for Behavior Management

Nick’s got a thing for button pushing, all kinds.  You name it, he pushes them, including mine.  Phone intercom, microwave fan, dishwasher, and his all-time favorite, fire alarms. My son is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.   He has a behavior support plan in place to address this behavior, along with throwing and dropping objects.  The incidences of the behaviors, seem to occur when he is bored or seeking attention.  It would be tempting to just throw my hands up in the air and accept this as Nick just being Nick.  However, I have always been determined to find ways to make things better for my son.  So, a few months ago, I rolled up my sleeves and got to work with Nick’s behaviorist.  Have things improved, yes and that’s what I’m happy to report this week.

Big Guy Nick 🙂

Nick has quite a rap sheet pulling over 50 fire alarm pulls since third grade.  In Blog #216~Putting Social Stories Into Action, I wrote about creating social stories to shape the desired behavior you want for a child.  A social story is a visual support that can help individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities understand new events, along with reinforcing skills, tasks or behaviors.  The behaviorist and I created an incentive plan built into a social story. This is reviewed twice at his adult developmental training program.  The story encourages Nick to make good choices.  Following the story read, Nick walks the halls with a staff member.

The staff cues Nick, using the compliance commands, “hands to self” and “big guys keep walking”.  Now I hope this doesn’t jinx anything, but I’m pleased to report that Nick has gone 3 months without pulling a fire alarm.  🙂

Now back to the behaviors he exhibits around the house.  In Blog #216, the behavior of throwing his iPads was addressed.  For a week, I locked both of them up.  After a very long week, Nick was excited to get them back.  Before this occurred, I read this social story to him several times, having him follow along and pointing to the basket where he needs to put the iPads when he is all done.  The incidences of Nick dropping and throwing his iPads has reduced significantly.

iPad Social Story:

The success of the behaviors improving are due to 3 things.  Nick, as do many individuals with autism, respond well to visuals.  He may not be able to read words, but he can follow along with the pictures and understand what is expected.  Secondly, parents and caregivers must be consistent in reading the social story and remain in close proximity, reminding the child to make good choices.  Behavior change doesn’t happen just by making a behavior plan and putting together a social story.  Success occurs when everyone is on board to carry out the plan in a consistent manner and follow through with consequences.

Have these behaviors been extinguished?  The answer is no to that question, but they have been contained.  Nick attempted to pull a fire alarm out in the community last week, but failed.  At home, he drops and tries to throw his iPads, but not near as much.  I have to stay on him to make good choices and reward him with praise and elbow bumps when he does.  If he doesn’t make a good choice the iPads get locked up.

I think the fact that my son is open to making good choices and being more compliant, is a win in my book.  I find it hopeful, that Nick is learning new behaviors at age 24.  I will continue to strive on following through and reinforcing the desired behaviors that will help Nick be more respectful and compliant young adult.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

Posted in Adult Day Programs for Special Needs, Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Fun Side of Nick

DS-ASD Fall Update

DS-ASD Fall Update

fall pumpkins

Here’s what Nick’s been up to this fall.  My son is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD).  He attends an adult developmental training program each day.  The program keeps him busy with many enrichment activities and developmental learning skills are incorporated throughout the day.  Outside this program, Nick enjoys spending time with his personal support respite workers out in the community.

Some of the highlights of Nick’s day program are community trips, including shopping, museums, bowling and going out to eat.  In house, communication, functional living skills, recreation, music, movies, gardening, crafts and cooking are all a part of the curriculum.

Here are some of the fun things Nick’s been up to this fall outside the day program……

NIU Football Game, with Dad. Go Huskies!

NIU football game

Pumpkin Patch with Miss R….

Nick loves eating out and date nights with his personal support workers, Miss R, Jodi and Kelsey.  The look on his face says it all!  I think he’s got the “smizing” down, Tyra Banks 🙂

Here in Chicago, the fall weather was less than desirable.  But, there were a handful of mild, sunny days in the chilly mix. At least the Chicago Bears are playing some great football this season.

Go Bears!

Nick Bears Jersey

Nick is 24 years old, but I’ve noticed that he continues to gain new skills and behaviors which are both good and challenging.  I am always seeking new ways to support him to make good choices and curtail the undesirable behaviors, like button, fire alarm pushing, throwing and dropping things.  I am happy to report that some of these behaviors have started to diminish since adding in two new social stories.  Social stories are great tools to teach new skills and behaviors.  Next week, I will share more about these two stories, and how they have been implemented both at home and at his day program.  How’s that for a teaser? 🙂

Life has been good this fall, in Nick’s world, and the rest of us are just trying to keep up.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

Posted in Adult Day Programs for Special Needs, Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #216~Putting Social Stories Into Action

Blog #216~Putting Social Stories Into Action

Recently I had to take a page out of my own playbook.  I took both iPads and locked them up for an entire week.  My son, Nick repeatedly throws and drops his iPads when he is done or the battery dies.   Nick is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD).  During that week, I created a social story designed to teach him how to take care of his iPads.

A social story is a visual support that helps individuals understand new events, and reinforces a desired skill, task, or behavior. They are useful for individuals that have Down syndrome, autism or other intellectual/developmental disabilities. Over the years, we’ve used social stories to help Nick navigate new situations like starting back to school, doctors and dentist appointments, vacations, and independent living skills such as showering and brushing teeth. Social stories provide a blueprint as to what will occur and what is expected from a behavior standpoint. Knowing what will happen and what’s expected, will also help to reduce anxiety.

In this case, the social story was designed to help Nick understand what is expected of his behavior, and why it’s important to make good choices.  Here is Nick’s iPad social story:

iPad social story

In Blog #214 you can read how to make a social story, click here to view:

https://nickspecialneeds.com/2018/08/20/blog-214-how-to-make-a-social-story/

Social stories should be broken down into steps using visuals and succinct wording that depict the who, what, where, when, why and how an event or behavior needs to happen.  Review the social story several times with the child before the event, new routine or behavior is to occur.

After a week with no iPads, Nick was excited to get them back.  Before this occurred I read the social story several times.  Nick followed along and pointed to the basket that he needed to put his iPads in when he was finished using them.  I made sure to stay in close proximity when he was using his iPads, to redirect him in case he decided to drop or throw them.

So, did the social story work help to curb the iPad drops and throws?  Absolutely, it reduced the incidences by 80% in just one week.  That’s a huge improvement.  Nick returned his iPads to the basket frequently, and in some cases he at least set it on the table instead of chucking it.  This indicates that he has impulse control and able to make better choices.   He received lots of verbal praises and elbow bumps for making good choices.

happy choice sad choice

Each day,  I review the social story before Nick gets to use his iPads to reinforce making good choices.  In a few weeks, I will introduce a new social story to deal with another behavior area we struggle with around the house.  Many parents of children with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism have trouble with dropping, swiping and knocking over items.  Nick’s behavior in this area has increased over the last couple of months.  This will be a tough one to tackle, stay tuned…….

Cats Earth was flat

Remember that the goal in using a social story is to teach the behavior or outcome that you are expecting from the child.  Give them a script for success for making good choices.  Keep in mind, when introducing a social story, to use one at a time consistently, before adding more.

At my son’s  adult day program, they are using a social story with positive reinforcement for making good choices.  Nick has quite a rap sheet pulling fire alarms, with over 50 pulls since third grade.  Each day, the staff reviews the social story and walk the halls with him, encouraging him to “keep walking with hands to self”.  This story was developed by myself and the ABA therapist on staff at his day program.  The story reminds Nick (using visuals again), that it’s not nice to pull fire alarms, as it scares his friends,  hurts their ears, and that it is hard for some clients to move.  If he pulls an alarm, Nick must exit the building and go next door, so he doesn’t see or hear the fire trucks.  When he makes good choices, he earns a happy face and gets a reward at the end of the day:

nick social story sprite reward for fire alarms

Not to jinx things, but so far, the fire alarm social story is working well. 🙂

The happy face visuals have been effective for Nick, and  pairing it with the idea of making good choices.  Nick likes to please, but at the same time he craves attention, and will often get it with negative behaviors.  So the focus on targeting good behaviors with the icon will be carried thru to the dropping social story in the near future.

Social stories can help guide a child to understand what will happen, where and what is expected of their behavior. It’s a great visual tool for teaching new skills and routines.  They can help to guide your child to smooth and successful experiences both at home, school and in the community.  Do you have a child that likes to swipe, drop or throw things?  What’s the most expensive thing they have destroyed?  It’s not easy, navigating a child with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  Working with a BCBA certified behavior therapist to develop strategies and social stories can help improve behaviors significantly.  Your child is never to old to learn and improve their behaviors.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 

~Teresa 🙂
Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism
Instagram @nickdsautism
Twitter @tjunnerstall
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Adult Day Programs for Special Needs, Autism, Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

DS-ASD, Nick’s Spring Update

DS-ASD, Nick’s Spring Update

spring flowers

The trees and flowers are budding and blooming here in the Chicago area.  A long overdue, and highly anticipated spring has finally arrived.  Here is what my son, Nick has been up to this spring.  Nick is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.

Nick attends an adult day program which provides enrichment activities both in-house and out in the community.  The structured curriculum and schedule of this program serves Nick, and his fellow clients well.  Community trips to local parks, restaurants, shopping for the weekly cooking segment are integrated throughout the week.  They have also been doing gardening and working on craft projects that will be sold next week, at the Garden and Craft Sale.  Nick enjoys going to this program, and looks forward to going to it daily.

Outside of his adult day program, Nick likes to go to the movies, parks, library and out to eat with his personal support/respite caregivers.

It’s the middle of April and a jacket is still required……

nick swing neighborhood

Oh happy day 🙂

Nick taco bell outside

For the past couple of years, Nick and his respite caregiver Jodi, have joined up with Christopher and his caregiver for date night, each Thursday.  These two guys have a lot of laughs together at the library, and going out to eat afterwards.  His buddy is moving out-of-state, so it was a bittersweet final date night for the two of them…….

Nick and Christopher saying goodbye, it’s the end of an era…..

nick and christopher

March is Down Syndrome Awareness Month, and 3/21 also being World Down Syndrome Day.  Nick and I spent this month doing advocacy and awareness about Down syndrome.  One campaign we were a part of was with Noah’s Dad, #provethemwrong which highlights the many awesome things that people with Down syndrome are doing in the world.  To follow Noah’s Dad and #provethemwrong click here for more information: http://noahsdad.com/prove-them-wrong-tee-shirt/

Nick Prove Them Wrong

Our family also supports The National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS) which is based in Chicago.  We are sponsors for the annual NADS Bowl-a-thon fundraiser.  Nick had a blast at the event :)……

Nick NADS bowlathon

Over the past weekend, we made a trip to Ohio to celebrate Nick’s cousin’s graduation from Bowling Green State University.  Nick is highly social, and loves spending time with his cousins, aunt, uncle, and grandparents.  Before the early 9am graduation ceremony began, in the crowded Stroh Center, Nick did his part to test a fire alarm cover.  The loud buzzer blared for a few seconds, before his Dad could close it back down.  It was a close call, but at least he didn’t pull the actual fire alarm.  He’s cheetah fast, and as I’ve said before, it’s Nick’s world, the rest of us are just trying to keep up.

Congratulations and elbow bumps to Nick’s cousin, Sam, well done!…….

Nick and Sam Graduation

Relaxing on the deck and enjoying a warm, spring day with his cousin, Anna….

Nick and Anna

Spring is a time of renewal, and taking in the beauty of nature coming back to life after a cold, harsh winter.  It feels so good to get outside and power walk again.  These walks are a time for me, to reflect on life’s blessings.  I feel very fortunate that my son is healthy, happy and enjoys his life as a young adult having Down syndrome and autism.  Yes, there are many challenges, and he certainly keeps us all on our toes.  But the joy and humor that Nick exudes, far outweighs the behavior challenges we incur daily.

It’s almost Mother’s Day, which is the official “green light” to plant flowers and vegetables here in the Chicago area.  I’m ready to fill up the clay pots with some color, on the empty pallet of the deck.  I can’t wait to put the tomato plants into the soil.  Gardening is my way of relaxing, and shaking off daily stress.  It’s so important to carve out time for yourself, and restore what can sometimes be taken away, by the demands of parenting a child with special needs.  Wishing all the moms on the front lines, a very Happy Mother’s Day.   My hope is that you make time to enjoy something on your own, that is fulfilling and relaxing each day.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

Happy Spring everyone 🙂

~Teresa 

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Adult Day Programs for Special Needs, Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Fun Side of Nick, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs

Winter Update: Nick DS-ASD

Winter Update: Nick DS-ASD

Here’s a look at Nick’s world, and what he’s been up to this winter.  My son Nick, is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  He attends an adult day program which provides a variety of enrichment activities.  These include work time, communication and learning, recreation, cooking, gardening and crafting.  There are monthly theme parties and game time playing Bingo and Yahtzee.  His group enjoyed a variety of community trips to the grocery store, dining out, library and PetSmart.

Nick relaxing at his adult day program….

Nick AID new chair

Turtle time…..

Nick AID turtle

Crafting, Nick made some awesome pillows…..

Bingo Prize Winner!

Nick bingo prize

Community trip to PetSmart……

Nick Petsmart 1              Nick Petsmart 2

Each week, Nick goes on community outings with his respite caregivers, Jodi and Miss R.  They take him out to the movies, library, mall and to restaurants…..

Over the holidays, Nick celebrated with family here in Chicago and in Key West……

Nick Christmas 2017

Fun in the Florida Keys, including a trip to The Hemingway House……

In February, we celebrated Nick’s birthday in Vail.  Did you read last week’s blog #198, about his adventures in Colorado?

It’s been a busy winter packed with loads of fun for Nick!  Seeing all his smiles in the adult day program, community outings and on vacations assures me that he is having a wonderful life.  Having a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism shouldn’t limit a family from getting out and having fun.  I hope these updates bring inspiration to other families who have a child with special needs.

That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa 🙂

To see more of Nick’s world check out these social media sites:

Facebook: @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

Posted in Adult Day Programs for Special Needs, Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs

Fall Update: Nick DS-ASD

Fall Update: Nick DS-ASD

Time flies when you are having fun, and Nick is having a blast this fall.  My son, Nick is 23 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  He attends an adult day program which provides a wide variety of activities.  Community outings this fall included volunteer jobs, bowling, visits to local parks, fire station, grocery shopping and going out to eat.  His group also works in-house doing gardening, cooking, skill along with communication building using their Augmentative Alternative Communication (AAC) devices.  Nick uses a program called Touch Chat on an iPad for communication.

Nick cooking at his day program…..

Nick cooking meatballs

Nick was very excited to visit the fire station 🙂  He wasted no time buckling up right away….

Nick fire truck

Outside his adult day program, Nick enjoys community visits to the library, mall, parks, shopping, the movies and eating out.  He continues to have “date nights” meeting up with his buddy, Christopher.  We are very grateful to have such caring respite workers, to take him out several times each week.

Fun at the Halloween Store…..

Nick crown

Buddy Up Tennis, see Blog #190 to read all about it @https://nickspecialneeds.com/?s=buddy+up

Nick buddy tennis 2

Nick relaxing at the library.  Make yourself at home there, Big Guy….. 🙂

Nick library

That’s Nick’s world and update for this fall.  I would like to take a moment to thank our respite workers, Lara, Jodi and Kelsey for all they do for Nick and our family.  My son has a full and rich life, and we are grateful to have these supports in place to make this possible.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa 🙂

Want to see more pictures of Nick?  We have a lot more on social media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall