Posted in Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs, Resources for Special Needs

Winter 2017 Update

Winter 2017 Update

I hesitate to call this a “winter” update, as we’ve been enjoying a string of mild, 65 degree days here in the Chicago area.

Hot tub in February, no jacket required…..

nick-hot-tub-feb

My son Nick, just celebrated his 23rd birthday a few weeks ago.  He has Down syndrome and autism.  He has been going to an adult day program, for the past year.  The program offers a variety of enriching activities, which he completely enjoys.  In addition, Nick does many community outings with his awesome respite caregivers, Jodi and Lara.  They go out to eat at a variety of restaurants, to the movies, library, and parks.  Nick loves being out and about, in the community.

We have been very active in our local Down syndrome support group, The National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS).  Even before we relocated to the Chicago area, NADS was instrumental in providing information and support for us.  They have been a vital resource for our family, and many others in the Chicagoland area.  To find our more information about The National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS), click here: http://www.nads.org.

nads-logo

The NADS Bowl-A-Thon event, is coming up on March 5th.  This event, is the single largest fundraiser for NADS.  This year, Nick has a fundraising page for his bowling team. You can click on the link to support Nick’s Elbow Bumpers Team and NADS:

http://www.firstgiving.com/fundraiser/nick-unnerstall/nads-32nd-annual-bowl-a-thon 

Big Guy’s signature elbow bump with his brother, Hank…..

nick-and-bro-x-mas

One more update, I want to briefly mention is coming up on March 21st, which is World Down Syndrome Day. 

world-down-syndrome-day

“World Down Syndrome Day is observed on March 21. On this day, people with Down syndrome and those who live and work with them throughout the world organize and participate in activities and events to raise public awareness and create a single global voice for advocating for the rights, inclusion and well-being of people with Down syndrome.”

One of the trademarks of World Down Syndrome Day, is rocking your socks!  This year I am working on partnership to raise money and awareness for Down syndrome, where you can purchase some funky socks.  I’ll be posting more information about this next week, on this site and the social media sites listed below. Stay tuned……

funky-socks

The Down syndrome community has supported Nick and our family, so much over the past 23 years.  These fundraising efforts are the least that we can do to give back, and help other families going down the same path. Having a community of support has helped us to navigate Nick’s world. Now at age 23, Nick is a very happy, young man who enjoys life.  That certainly brings a smile to my face. 🙂

nick-smiling

That’s what is in my noggin this week! 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism on Facebook and Pinterest

#nickdsautism on Instagram

@tjunnerstall on Twitter

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Parenting Special Needs, Uncategorized

Blog #167~Brittany’s Baskets of Hope

brittany-baskets

Blog #167~Brittany’s Baskets of Hope

“Just because you are born with a disability, it doesn’t mean you can’t do everything you want to do!”   This is the message that a young entrepreneur, Brittany Schiavone wants to share with the world.  Brittany’s Baskets of Hope, Inc. is a non-profit organization which creates and delivers welcome baskets full of resources, love and hope to new Down syndrome families across the country.

brittanys-basket-contents

Brittany’s Baskets of Hope’s mission, is to celebrate and support families with a new baby with Down syndrome. “We want all newborns of every ability to know that they can do anything!”

Currently, this non-profit organization has sent baskets to over 175 families in 42 states across the country!   Brittany has spoken at schools, colleges, and conferences across Long Island.  Her work has been featured on FOXBusiness.com, The Mighty, Ditch the Label, Elephant Journal, and News 12 Long Island, where she was selected as one of the news channel’s “12 Making a Difference in 2016.”

100% of the funds raised go to supporting families who have a new baby with Down syndrome.  These donations are used to purchase items for the welcome baskets and to mail them to families.  Each basket is put together personally by her, and includes resources and a variety of baby items.  Brittany wants to spread the word, “That no matter who you are or how you’re born, you can lead a full, joyful life!”

If you would like to request a basket to be sent to a new family having a baby with Down syndrome or make a donation to Brittany’s Baskets of Hope, click here:

http://www.brittanysbasketsofhope.org

 You can follow and support this organization on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter as well!

brittanys-baskets-of-hope-logo

My son Nick, was born with Down syndrome.  After speneding a week in the hospital ICU, he was released on Valentine’s day, 23 years ago.  I was sent home with only a couple of brochures about Down syndrome ,and nothing more.  Looking back it would have been wonderful to receive such a gift and the reassurance from an adult having Down syndrome like her.  I applaud Brittany for her generosity, positive spirit, and commitment to help other families.  Her baskets are filled with resources and special baby gifts for new babies with Down syndrome and given freely with her love.  And most importantly, she sends with each family a strong message of hope.  That’s something a new parent receiving a recent diagnosis of Down syndrome needs the most.

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa

Follow Nick on Facebook & Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism, Instragram #nickdsautism, and on Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Parenting Special Needs

Blog #166~ Lessons Learned on a Ski Slope

vail

Blog #166~ Lessons Learned on a Ski Slope

After a 27 year hiatus, I recently went on a ski trip to Vail, Colorado.  My older son, Hank had never skied before so we opted to take a lesson together.  Our instructor Brad, offered up many useful tips to help us navigate the slopes. Many of the things that Brad pointed out, can apply to raising a child with special needs.  My younger son, Nick is 22, and has Down syndrome and autism.  The daily challenges can weigh a parent down both physically and mentally.  That’s were the lessons I learned on a ski slope come in.

Lessons Learned on a Ski Slope…….

*If you point your ski’s too far uphill you are going to roll down…..

Over the years I’ve set goals for my son, Nick.  Many of these were aimed too high.  As a result, my expectations were not realistic, and Nick fell further back than I anticipated.  For example, during his elementary years Nick had a handwriting goal.  I was determined that he would be able to write his name and pushed hard for several year to keep it in his IEP.  This goal was my dream, but not Nick’s reality.  A pen or marker in Nick’s hands equals scribbling all over his skin and clothes.  I learned that you have to adjust your child’s goals to what is reasonable and attainable for them, and not for yourself.

*Don’t Fred Flintstone your feet…..

When you ski it’s important to shift the weight on your feet and apply the pressure at different points in order to make the turns.  If you dig in and “Fred Flintstone” your feet, the skiing becomes rigid and doesn’t glide naturally.  There has to be room for some give and take, when working with a child with special needs. It’s unfair to put pressure on your child to do everything you want, in a given day.  Sometimes you have to let that foot up and allow them to have room to understand, process, and do things in their own time. Take your foot off the brakes, otherwise, things will break down for your child.

fred-flintstone-feet

*Learn how to stop correctly…….

The day before our ski lesson, my son Hank went out with his Dad, Al, to try out skiing.  He came home very tired, cranky and discouraged due to going to fast, falling, and struggling to get back up.  During the ski lesson, he learned how to maneuver his body, and the proper ways to stop.  Afterwards, Hank had much more confidence and felt success.  If you push your child with special needs to do too much, they become frustrated as Hank did. This can lead to a risk of sensory  overload and potential meltdowns.  Recognize those signs of distress, and stop the activity before your child reaches a boiling point.

Hank and I with our ski instructor, Brad…..

vail-with-brad

*Relax and take in the scenery….

On the ski lift, our instructor Brad, encouraged me to put my ski’s up on the foot rest and relax.  He could sense that I was nervous about leaving the comfort of the bunny slope.  He reminded me to breathe, look around, and take in the beautiful scenery.  I think the same can be true in life with a child who has special needs.  The seamless schedule of doctor and therapy appointments, along with the pressure of working with them at home can get to be too much.   Nick had very low muscle tone, which is a trait of having Down syndrome.  I was constantly providing stimulating activities and exercises to get him stronger so he could roll over, crawl, sit up and walk.  Beyond gross motor skills, there was work to be done with feeding, speech and fine motor skills. The guilt of not feeling like you are doing enough for your child can burden a parent even more.  At some point, you have to just relax and not beat yourself up.  Take a breath and enjoy the beauty of your child for who they are.

My son, Nick……

nick-senior-alarm-pic

Skiing like many other sports offer lessons for us to learn in our lives.  That day on the slopes,  I was reminded about the importance of being flexible in what I expect from my son with Down syndrome and autism.  On the eve of his 23rd birthday, I reflect back on how far Nick has come.  I going to take a moment and breathe.  Like the backdrop of the blue sky against the snow covered Rocky Mountains,  I just want to take that in.  🙂 

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa

happy-birthday-boys

Wishing both Nick and his Dad, Al a very Happy Birthday this week ……

al-and-nick-vail

Follow Nick on Instagram @nickdsautism, on Facebook and Pinterest @Down syndrome with a Slice of Autism and Twitter #tjunnerstall

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Fun Side of Nick

Blog #165~ Betty White on Staying Positive

betty-white

Blog #165~ Betty White on Staying Positive

Betty White turned 95 last week, and beams with happiness and positivity!  She was interviewed by Katie Couric, who asked this American treasure, about the state of our country, and how divided it is.

Here is what Betty had to say……

“It’s not in the best place we’ve ever been, but I think that’s the time, to buckle down and really work positively as much as you can. Instead of saying, Oh this is terrible, oh he’s terrible, just think alright, there is nothing I can do about that right now. But I can do the best in my little circle.  So if I do that, maybe you’ll do your best, and we’ll get through.”

Katie Couric went on to state how hard it is for some people to be positive, with so much negativity with the barrage of politics and social media creating a toxic environment.  Betty, acknowledged this, and offered these thoughts…….  

So many people think negatively saying, you know what I hate, oh I hate this.  Instead of alright, I’ll get through this.  Then you start lifting up a bit.”

rise-by-lifting-others

“If you start with, you know what I hate, you’re going to go right down the tubes” 

Betty White is a positive thinker, in her words a “cockeyed optimist” and attributes that to staying happy all 95 years of her life.  I thought about this interview, when the sun came out after countless foggy, gray days here in Chicago.  I took a power walk soaking in the sunny, blue skies and mild 55 degree day.  I could feel the sunshine lifting my spirits.  Not everyday starts with sunshine, especially in January.  But my day ALWAYS start with a smile, (and usually a fart and giggle), from my son, Nick.  He is 22 years old and has Down syndrome and autism.

nick-culvers

It’s a great way to start each day.🙂  Nick’s smile is contagious, his attitude uplifting.  Anyone in Nick’s inner circle has witnessed his joy.  A treat at Culver’s brings on such happiness to big guy.  Nick does well finding pleasure in the simple things, being silly, and making people laugh. Yes, he has his moments of getting frustrated and upset like the rest of us.  But he shakes it off, never holding a grudge or negativity.

Betty White and my son, Nick, have the right idea by entering each day with a positive attitude.  It will not only elevate your mood, but those around you.

It’s no wonder why Betty White looks and feels these way she does at age 95, with her words of wisdom…….. *Buckle down  *Think positive  *Do the best in your little circle *You got to get through this, one foot in front of the other.  

Let the sunshine come out in your heart and beam onto others. Your positive spirit will ripple out of your own circle and expand to those around you. That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

water-circle

Follow Nick:

Facebook/Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Fun Side of Nick

Nick’s World Update

 Nick’s World Update

Have you settled into 2017 yet, after the busy holiday season?  I’m so happy to be back to share Nick’s world with you!  Nick is 22 years old, and has Down syndrome and autism.  Here are some of the highlights of Big Guy’s holiday fun.

We spent the holidays at home, here in Chicago. Nick enjoyed seeing family.  He’s always happy to see his brother, Hank and share elbow bumps!

nick-and-bro-x-mas

Kibbie had a very “Meowy Christmas” 🙂

kibbie-stockings

Nick was excited to get a new iPad mini.  The new Big Grip case for the iPad mini is called the Big Grip Tweener.  It is much slimmer, more age appropriate in design, and best of all still protects as well as the original Big Grip case.

big-grip-tweener

Nick relishes a nice reflective bag almost as much, as his new iPad mini 🙂

nick-red-bag

Over the holidays, we entertained family and friends.  Nick is use to a certain schedule in the evenings.  It can be tricky to get him to stretch out the time, once the sun goes down. He was very patient and social during happy hour, and a leisurely dinner.  Inevitably, once the meal is over, he wastes no time.  He springs up, grabs his Little Debbie snack cakes and evening meds, then sets them on the kitchen island.  After dessert, he will beeline upstairs, strips off his clothes and is ready for a shower.

beelinne-pic

At the family gathering,  we tried stalling him while the desserts were being passed and the coffee was brewing.  I made the mistake of setting the Swiss Cake Rolls and meds off to the side for just a few more minutes.  Nick would have no part of this, and let it be known.  He took his iPad mini and did a huge karate chop right into the……

nick-pumpkin-pie

Nick was done!  We deflected the incident with an “uh-oh” comment and swiftly got his snack cakes back, to avoid a meltdown.  Sometimes, you have to compromise on your holiday schedule, and respect your child’s need to keep a consistent routine.

After the holidays, Al and I went on his company’s year in trip incentive to Costa Rica.  Nick was in very good hands with his respite care giver, Jodi. There was a good amount of logistics to do when leaving your child with a caregiver.  We put together temporary custody, child care and medical authorization agreements along with a detailed schedule.  In addition,  I prepared a social story so that he could see the change in routine and his schedule.  Here it is in part, below.  Social stories help to give the blueprint for understanding schedules and what each day will bring.  For more on using visual schedules, check out my last post, Blog #164~Why Use a Visual Schedule?

costa-rica-social-story

Nick had so much fun with Jodi going out to eat and hanging out at home. His other respite care giver, Miss R. also took him out over the weekend. We are blessed to have such caring, capable, and patient women to take such great care of Nick.

Want more pictures and videos of Nick?  Check out our social media sites. Follow Nick: Facebook @Down syndrome With a Slice of Autism, Instagram  #nickdsautism, Twitter @ #tjunnerstall

nick-taco-bell-new

All in all, the holidays and extended vacation afterwards went smoothly,  with only a dented pumpkin pie, and a few more attention seeking behaviors.  Most of these included higher incidences of dropping/ throwing things, turning water faucets on, and peeing on the floor next to the toilet.  Those behaviors are to be expected with busy holiday meal and house preparations,  a house full of company, and changes in routine.

Oh, one more thing, Nick managed to pull another fire alarm on  Friday the 13th. That is, the ultimate attention seeking behavior!  Tally count is now at 43 pulls since third grade. Hey, it’s Nick’s world, the rest of us are just trying to keep up.

Here’s to getting back to a regular routine and settling into 2017.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Education and Special Needs, Feeding, Personal Hygiene, Toileting, Parenting Special Needs, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #164~Why Use a Visual Schedule?

doctor-checkup

Blog #164~Why Use a Visual Schedule?

We all hate getting lost, it can be aggravating  and nervewracking. That’s why we use maps to help navigate our way.

mapquest

The same is true for a child with special needs who lacks verbal and cognitive skills.  Providing a visual schedule allows your child to see what is going to happen in their day. My son, Nick is 22 years old and has Down syndrome and autism. Visual schedules provide many benefits for him to travel smoothly, through his daily routine.

Nick fist bump AID

Benefits of Using a Visual Schedule:

*Provides structure and predictability by showing a child what is coming up next.  This greatly reduces anxiety and builds confidence.

*Helps with transitions from one activity to the next.

*Picture form is easier to understand than verbal instructions.  Children with autism often comprehend pictures and/or written directions easier than verbal cues alone.

*Helps to teach sequence of events especially when using words, “first”, “next”, and “last”.

*Expedites learning routines and fosters independence in self-help/hygiene skills and household/school jobs.

handwashing-routine

*Helps with time management and literacy development by reading through pictures and words associated with them.

*Improves conversation skills by giving a visual framework of what they did and what was their favorite part of the end of the day.

*Assists teachers and caregivers with routine changes, when things get out of sync.  It also helps to introduce a new and/or different activity.

dentist-checkup-visual

Visual schedules come in all shapes and forms and many are available in Google images.  You can adjust the length and type of images, (PECS-Picture Exchange System, photos, written words,  iPad/ smart phone apps) to what your child will most easily understand.

first-then-app

It’s best to start with a small routine and adapt the schedules based on your child’s needs and abilities. Try pairing a non-preferred activity (first) followed by a preferred choice (next).  Your child’s speech therapist can be of great help in creating picture sequences that would fit their needs.

Going through a visual schedule with your child, helps them understand what is going to happen, and what behavior you expect.

Here is one we use when going to the mall.  Note the visual below has going to the stores (first)  and Taco Bell (next) as the preferred activity.

IMG_3865

Sequence for going to church:

photo (106)

Full Day Schedule: ( Note, this could be broken up in separate pieces if this would be to overwhelming).

visual-schedule-for-a-day

Using visual schedules have been shown to be helpful for children and adults with special needs by giving them more control on what goes on in their daily lives.  It provides the road map to navigate for a smooth ride through their daily routines.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

@Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism on Facebook and Pinterest

#nickdsautism on Instagram

@tjunnerstall on Twitter

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Autism Safety and Wandering, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #163~Safety & Your Special Needs Child

autism-elope

Blog #163~Safety and Your Special Needs Child

I’ve written a few posts about elopement in past blogs. The terror of losing a child is unlike anything else.  My son Nick has Down syndrome and autism, and I know first hand how that feels.  It is essential to put safety measures in place to prevent wandering/elopement.  This week’s blog is about safety and prevention measures from a police officer’s perspective.

police-car

Recently at the National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS) retreat, a presentation was given by a NADS member, who is a police officer.  Some of the key points made were on safety and  wandering/elopement prevention.  Seatbelts alone don’t always work for older kids with special needs.  There are many seat belt locks available as well as bigger car seats for children over 65 pounds, which have  5 point restraint.

5-point-harness

There were several suggestions given to promote safety, and prevent elopement.  Putting stop icons on all doors, using door/window alarms,  and changing the locks or moving them higher.  It might also be necessary, (especially if your child is non-verbal), to invest in a tracking device/bracelet and an identification bracelet.  Some police departments have tracking devices available.  For more detailed information on this, type in “Blog #142” in the search engine on the top, right side.  Blog #142, gives specifics on elopement and autism.

caretrak bracelet

Nick wears a medic alert bracelet that stays securely on.  Information on the back includes his name, medic alert number, Down syndrome, autism and non-verbal.

medic-alert

Check with your local police department about getting in the data base to provide more detailed information about your child with special needs.  Here in Illinois, the Premise Alert was mandated, in 2009. The Illinois Premise Alert Program (Public Act 96-0788) provides for Public Safety Agencies in the State of Illinois to allow people with special needs to provide information to Police, Fire and EMS personnel to be kept in a database.

In addition to the  Illinois Premise Alert Program, a new program aims to take 9-1-1 a step further. Smart911 is a program that supplies 9-1-1 operators with detailed personal information, including names of family members, photos, allergies, pets and more.

smart911

Smart911 is available in participating dispatch centers across the United States.Smart911 enhances the information that a 911 call can provide and helps first responders help you faster during an emergency.  Citizens create an online profile through a secure website at www.Smart911.com. This profile contains information that might be important in an emergency. If you place a 911 call anywhere within the county, your profile is displayed to the 911 dispatcher at the Emergency Communications Center, and the information is relayed to first responders.  Smart 911 is a national service that is available free to everyone. The service can be especially valuable to households with young children, seniors, or anyone with a physical or mental disability.

It is essential to take precautions to promote the utmost safety and security for you child with special needs.  Especially if they are non-verbal and have no concept of how to keep themselves out of harms way.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Down Syndrome With A Slice of Autism on Facebook and Pinterest

#nickdsautism on Instagram

@tjunnerstall on Twitter

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Fun Side of Nick

Cyber Monday Update

cyber-monday

Cyber Monday Update

Hope you all had a wonderful Thanksgiving holiday.  Nick was very excited to see his brother, Hank and his grandparents.  As I was setting the dining room table the night before, he went to his PECS (Picture Exchange Communication System) book, and handed me this icon with his grandparents on it. Nick is 22 years old and has Down syndrome and autism.

nick-gma-gpa-icon

We enjoyed a nice Thanksgiving dinner and plenty of leftover mashed potatoes for big guy!  Nick was happy to see his Thomas the Tank engine ornament, while decorating the Christmas tree.

nick-ornament

Nick tried to make off with his brother’s new vacuum cleaner for himself.  He must have thought Christmas came early for him, instead of Hank. He managed to drag the box all the way into the living room.   He loves to vacuum and does a nice job at it.  This has been one of his community jobs for several years since high school.

nick-hanks-vacuum

It was a nice visit with family.  The leftovers are finished, the Christmas trees are up, now onto Cyber Monday.  I might have to add another Shark vacuum to the cart.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram @nickdsautism

Twitter #tjunnerstall

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Happy Thanksgiving

thankful

Happy Thanksgiving

It’s a busy week, so I’m keeping this brief.  Take time to count your blessings and enjoy the special time with loved ones, as you gather together.

I am grateful that Nick is happy, healthy, loving and yes, even mischievous, on this chilly Monday morning.  He kicked off the day in rare form.  In the 5 seconds it took to grab my purse, he rushed over and tossed my freshly brewed coffee all over the kitchen floor. Oh Nick, you do keep me on my toes, and for that I am thankful too.  Hey, it’s Nick’s world…. the rest of us are just trying to keep up.

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

Happy Thanksgiving!

~Teresa 🙂

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #162~ Horseback Riding Therapy

Blog #162~ Horseback Riding Therapy

nick-horseback-therapy

Horseback riding therapy, also known as Equine Assisted Therapy, involves interactions with horses for individuals with and without special needs, including those with physical, cognitive and emotional issues.  Hippotherapy is another term used by physical, speech, and occupational therapists to reach their patients on a personal level.

horseback-therapy

There are many benefits such as motor, emotional and sensory sensations that come with riding a horse. Horseback riding gently and rhythmically moves the rider’s body in a manner similar to a human gait, to improve  in flexibility, balance and muscle strength.

At age one, my son Nick was unable to sit up by himself due his low muscle tone, which is a trait of having Down syndrome.

Nick at age one…..

nick-low-tone-high-chair

We had to prop him up in the high chair, so he wouldn’t slide down or slump to either side.  Nick was receiving physical, occupational and speech therapy in his early intervention program.  Shortly after his first birthday, we enrolled him in a horseback riding therapy program.

Person’s having Down syndrome please note:

“Prior to considering hippotherapy as a treatment strategy for your child, it is important that they have current cervical x-rays to ensure the atlantoaxial joint (or C1-C2) is not at risk for dislocation.  Some people with Down Syndrome also may have a condition known as Atlantoaxial Instability — a misalignment of the top two vertebrae of the neck. This condition makes these individuals more prone to injury if they participate in activities that overextend or flex the neck. Parents are urged to have their child examined by a physician to determine whether or not their child should be restricted from sports and activities that place stress on the neck injury.”

In less than nine months, of incorporating the horseback riding therapy, we noticed a vast improvement in Nick’s posture both in strength and endurance.  At first he couldn’t tolerate a helmet as it weighed him down, (as you can see in the first picture of this post).  But soon, he not only wore a helmet, but was able to keep his head upright, along with and sitting up better.

Nick with his brother, Hank, taken nine months after starting horseback riding therapy…

nick-sitting-with-hank

We decided on horseback riding therapy, initially to help our son gain trunk strength.  However, we soon realized there were many additional benefits that came along with it.  Not only did Nick ride on top of the horse, he also learned how to care for the horse by feeding, patting and brushing them.  This helped to create an emotional bond and opened up new sensory experiences that he couldn’t get in a clinical setting.  Riding a horse helped to wake up the sensory preceptors, making for a fun and motivating experience for him.

Horseback riding therapy was a wonderful experience for our son with special needs. The horses were gentle friends that helped Nick get stronger, build relationships through unspoken communication, and taught him about responsibility.  That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall