Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Education and Special Needs, Parenting Special Needs

Blog #227~Daily living skills you can work on at home with your kids during the COVID-19 Crisis

Blog #227~Daily living skills you can work on at home with your kids during the COVID-19 Crisis

So, your stuck at home with your kids during this COVID-19 crisis, now what? This is actually the perfect time to work on daily living skills with your kids. Why are these skills important to know?

Let’s go back to the purpose of the Individual Education Plan (IEP):   To promote further education, employment and independent living skills.

Often, in our busy lives it’s easier to skip over teaching daily living skills on a consistent basis with our kids. So now that time has slowed down, why not take a few of these skills and hone in on them? Not only will this help your child become more independent, it will also promote confidence, family teamwork and as a bonus– many skills provide sensory input. My son Nick is 26 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD). Over the years we have built in many daily living skills into his routine at home.

Here are a few of the jobs that Nick does around the house and how they provide sensory input:

*Recycling (replacement behavior for throwing)
*Can crushing (sensory and motor activity and replacement behavior for throwing)
*Carry laundry basket and load washing machine (heavy work/ organizing)
*Put away groceries (organizing activity)
*Empty Dishwasher (organizing and sensory activity)
*Cleaning/ wiping down countertops and windows (organizing activity)
*Vacuuming (heavy work which is calming)

 

The following link below is a full list of daily living skills in the areas of self-care, personal hygiene, kitchen skills, home management skills, to name a few. Focus on one or two skills at a time. You can access visuals and task strips off of Google Images and videos on YouTube:

https://learningforapurpose.com/2019/09/01/the-best-functional-life-skill-resources-for-individuals-with-autism

This is a time of uncertainty and anxiety levels are running high for all of us. First of all breathe, our kids take cues from how we are reacting during this crisis. Next, cabin fever is a real thing, so try to enjoy each other and find ways to work together at home. This will benefit the whole family. Give you kids a sense of purpose and foster new skills to bolster their confidence. This will help them grow to become more independent. Be well and don’t forget to keep those iPads charged 🙂

One last thing– World Down Syndrome Day is this Saturday 3/21– Here are 3 easy ways that you can help promote awareness, acceptance and inclusion: https://nickspecialneeds.com/2018/03/19/blog-200world-down-syndrome-day/

That’s what is in my noggin this week,

Teresa 🙂

LOGO TRANSPARENCY (5)

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Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Fun Side of Nick, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs

DS-ASD Winter Update

DS-ASD Winter Update

Vail view 2019

My son Nick is a young adult, who has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD). He attends an adult developmental day training program which provides a variety of structured activities. This week, I want to catch everyone up on what Nick’s been doing this winter.

Nick’s day program includes learning and enrichment activities. Clients enjoy learning new skills, vocational jobs, exercise, crafts, shopping, cooking, theme days/parties and community outings. The structured program is a necessity for individuals like Nick who have a secondary diagnosis of autism. He looks forward to going to this program daily.

Nick at his adult developmental day training program:

Nick bowling fall 2019     nick connect game

There have been many celebrations and fun excursions this winter for Nick. Here are a few of the highlights:

Christmas in Chicago was unseasonably warm this year, no jacket or shoes required. 🙂

Nick Christmas presents 2019     Nick Christmas outside 2019

We recently enjoyed a nice vacation in Vail. Nick loved the dog sledding with Mountain Mushers. He got to ride with his guide and friend, Cameron for the third year in a row. This year Nick road up the gondola for the first time and we did snow tubing. It’s always nice to go into Vail village, and this year his respite worker joined us in the fun and helped support Nick for a few days of our trip.

Vail vacation highlights:

Nick and Cameron Dog Sledding 2019   Dog Sledding 2019 Nick and Miss R Vail 2019   Nick and Dad Tubing 2019

Nick just celebrated his 26th birthday! He had a pizza party with cupcakes at his day program. We also had cake at home and a nice birthday lunch with family.

Nick’s birthday highlights:

Nick birthday at Keeler 2020   nick 26 birthday

nick birthday 2   Nick HBD

It’s been a fun and busy winter in Nick’s world. As most of you know, I have completed my memoir, “A New Course: A Mother’s Journey Navigating Down Syndrome and Autism”  which is forthcoming on May 5, 2020!  My next post will showcase the book and include pre-order details and how you can get your hands on a copy. I can’t wait to share this with all of you. I truly appreciate your support in my writing and following Nick’s world. 🙂

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick’s world to view more photos and videos on social media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With a Slice of Autism

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LOGO TRANSPARENCY (5)

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Parenting Special Needs, Self-care for special needs parents

Ditch the New Year’s Resolutions:Here’s a Better Idea!

Ditch the New Year’s Resolutions: Here’s a Better Idea!

2020 plan

Happy New Year! It’s time to clear the decks and start fresh.🙂 How many times have you made a new year’s resolution and failed to keep it? As a 35+year fitness professional and mother of a son with special needs (DS-ASD), here is my advice: Ditch the old school resolutions and try a different approach!

Here’s what I’ve got for you to get started:

*Great self-care tips and easy ways to build in healthy habits.

*Quick, easy and  practical ways to get back into fitness.

*Simple approaches to help your child with special needs to gain independent living skills.

Click on this link to read how to make a new plan for 2020: https://nickspecialneeds.com/tag/ditch-the-new-years-resolutions/

Let’s do this, 2020 is going to be a great year! That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

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Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Down Syndrome Awareness Month

Down Syndrome Awareness Month

Down syndrome awareness ribbon

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month. My son, Nick is 25 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism. As a parent and advocate, I strive to educate others to better understand these conditions. Down syndrome awareness is about promoting understanding, acceptance and inclusion of all individuals with Down syndrome.

FACTS about Down syndrome from National Down Syndrome Society (NDSS):

*Down syndrome occurs when an individual has a full or partial extra copy of chromosome 21. This additional genetic material alters the course of development and causes the characteristics associated with Down syndrome.

*There are three types of Down syndrome: trisomy 21 (nondisjunction) accounts for 95 percent of cases, translocation accounts for about 4 percent and mosaicism accounts for about 1 percent.

*Down syndrome is the most commonly occurring chromosomal condition. One in every 691 babies in the United States is born with Down syndrome.

*There are more than 400,000 people living with Down syndrome in the United States.

*Down syndrome occurs in people of all races and economic levels.

*The incidence of births of children with Down syndrome increases with the age of the mother. But due to higher fertility rates in younger women, 80 percent of children with Down syndrome are born to women younger than 35.

*People with Down syndrome have an increased risk for certain medical conditions such as congenital heart defects, respiratory and hearing problems, Alzheimer’s disease, childhood leukemia and thyroid conditions. Many of these conditions are now treatable, so most people with Down syndrome lead healthy lives.

*A few of the common physical traits of Down syndrome are low muscle tone, small stature, an upward slant to the eyes and a single deep crease across the center of the palm. Every person with Down syndrome is a unique individual and may possess these characteristics to different degrees or not at all.

*Life expectancy for people with Down syndrome has increased dramatically in recent decades — from 25 years old in 1983 to 60 years old today.

*People with Down syndrome attend school, work and participate in decisions that affect them, and contribute to society in many wonderful ways.

*All people with Down syndrome experience cognitive delays, but the effect is usually mild to moderate and is not indicative of the many strengths and talents that each individual possesses.

*Quality educational programs, a stimulating home environment, good health care and positive support from family, friends and the community enable people with Down syndrome to develop their full potential and lead fulfilling lives.

More information @http://www.ndss.org/Down-Syndrome/What-Is-Down-Syndrome/

NDSS_logo

Here are a few simple ways to promote Down syndrome awareness:

*Post information and stories about individuals with Down syndrome on social media.

*Parents of a child with Down syndrome, can send updates, pictures and tell your story to your family doctor and OB/GYN. Consider becoming a Hope Advocate- where you will get a custom hope kit to distribute to your OB/GYN and family doctor. More information @https://hopestory.org/sign-up/

*Many local Down syndrome support groups have promotional materials, like books and bookmarks that can be distributed at libraries and schools.

*Down syndrome support groups have public speakers available to talk with schools, businesses, community groups, hospitals, and other organizations.

*Support or volunteer for local fundraisers like the Buddy Walk in your community @http://www.ndss.org/buddy-walk/

*Encourage your kids to volunteer for Special Olympics and Best Buddies programs through their school.

*Always use and promote “people first language” to respectively speak about a person with a disability. Individuals with Down syndrome should always be referred to as people first.  Instead of “a Down syndrome child,” it should be “a child with Down syndrome.” Also avoid “Down’s child” and describing the condition as “Down’s,” as in, “He has Down’s.”

down-syndrome-awareness-month

Thank you for supporting Down syndrome awareness this month! That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

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Posted in Adult Day Programs for Special Needs, Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs

DS-ASD~Fall Update 2019

DS-ASD~Fall Update 2019

Happy first day of fall 🙂! Here is an update on my son, Nick who is 25 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD). My son attends an adult developmental training day program which he enjoys very much. The program has a nice variety of learning and enrichment activities incorporated throughout the day. Outside this program, Nick enjoys spending time with his personal support respite workers in the community going out to eat, movies, parks and other activities.

Some of the highlights of Nick’s day program are community trips, including shopping, visits to parks and local amusements along with going out to eat. In house, the curriculum includes learning centers, communication, functional living skills, recreation, music, movies, gardening, crafts, cooking, Friday fun days and other themes round out this program each week.

Here are a few pictures of Nick at his adult developmental training program:

nick sweeping keeler      Nick nature walk keeler     Nick visor keeler      Nick learning centers keeler

nick connect game

On 9/11 the clients at his program made thank you cards for local first responders. Here’s Nick giving cards to a police officer:

Nick and APD

Nick’s verbal skills are limited, due to having the additional diagnosis of autism and verbal apraxia of speech along with Down syndrome. He uses an Augmentative and Alternative (AAC) device and picture exchange system (PECS) to communicate his needs. There are two ways that I know that he likes going to his day program. Over the weekend, he packed his lunch and put it in his backpack, which he set by the front door. He also took the school icon out of his PECS book and puts it on a Velcro task strip and handed it to me. It’s nice to see how much he wants to go to this program. The routine and structure helps individuals with Down syndrome, autism and other intellectual and developmental disabilities navigate their days successfully.

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick and see more pictures of him in action, along with other stories:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram @nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Parenting Special Needs, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #232~Online Links for Special Needs Parents

Blog #232~Online Links for Special Needs Parents

Support hands

This week, I’ve provided a list of online links, to support special needs parents. These links are for parents of individuals with Down syndrome, autism, a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD) and other intellectual and developmental disabilities:

Down syndrome support links:

Down syndrome awareness ribbon

http://www.ndss.org The National Down Syndrome Society is the national advocate for the value, acceptance and inclusion of people with Down syndrome.

http://www.ndsccenter.org The country’s oldest national organization for people with Down syndrome, their families and the professionals who work with them.

http://www.nads.org NADS is the National Association for Down syndrome and a solid support group in the Chicago area. There is also more links for dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism here (including a complete list with signs and symptoms for parents wondering if their child has more than just Down syndrome).

http://www.gigiplayhouse.org Down syndrome Awareness Centers all over the Midwest and expanding to New York, NY and Mexico. These centers provide play, fitness and social groups.

http://www.noahsdad.com Support and inspiration for parents who have a baby or child with Down syndrome. There is some great information and useful tips and links and positively focused. Noah’s Dad has also launched Hope Story to raise awareness and provide additional support.

https://hopestory.org Hope Story – Down Syndrome Diagnosis Support and Resources exists to give support, encouragement and hope to parents whose child have received a Down syndrome diagnosis; to provide free resources to the medical community to help them deliver a Down syndrome diagnosis, and to find ways for parents of children born with Down syndrome to use their unique story to bring hope to others.

http://www.futureofdowns.com Run by parents of children with Down’s syndrome. Covers a wide range of topics regarding babies and children with Down’s syndrome, pregnant and in need of advice on screening and tests or have just received a positive diagnosis following an amnio or CVS.

Autism support links:

autism ribbon

http://www.facebook.com/autismdiscussionpage This page was developed by Bill Nason, MS, LLP to discuss tools that help children on the spectrum. This site provides solid information and strategies related to autism.

http://www.autismspeaks.org Autism Speaks provides information and advocacy and good general information and links.

http://www.autism-society.org The Autism Society improves the lives of all affected by autism through education, advocacy, services, research and support.

http://www.tacanow.org Talk About Curing Autism and has a ton of links and articles along with coffee groups.

http://www.myautismteam.com Online support group for parents to share daily trials, triumphs, questions and recommendations.

http://www.mayer-johnson.com Boardmaker software for assistive technology/AAC devices.

http://www.teeach.com Information on TEEACH materials

More links for special needs parents:

https://thearc.org The Arc: For People With Intellectual and Developmental- Information and referral services, individual advocacy to address education, employment, health care and other concerns, self-advocacy initiatives, residential support, family support, employment programs, leisure and recreational programs.

https://www.parentingspecialneeds.org Parenting Special Needs Magazine share information and inspiration for parents of children with special needs.

https://www.woodbinehouse.com/ Publisher of the Special-Needs Collection…books for parents, children, teachers, and other professionals.

http://www.pottytrainingsolutions.com Gathers the most common problems and their solutions to help take the stress out of this major milestone.

http://www.easterseals.com Easter Seals offers programs, training and equipment for families.

wwww.bridges4kids.org Great, practical resources for special needs families.

http://www.specialedadvocacy.org Advocacy site for parents and teachers

Down syndrome and autism links:

DS-ASD Ribbon

https://http://www.nickspecialneeds.com My site provides solid information on topics specific to a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD), including supports, communication and speech/feeding issues, occupational therapy, behavior/ ABA and much more.

http://www.ds-asd-connection.org Offers good information related to a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.

http://www.theupsideofdowns.org Provides support, advocacy and information specific to a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.

Facebook groups for DS-ASD There are several Facebook groups directly related to Down syndrome and autism. These groups are a safe place to share information, ask questions, and help each other. Visit my Facebook page- Down Syndrome With a Slice of Autism. You can also type in Down syndrome and autism into the search box to access additional groups.

Online support groups and links provide information, assistance, resources and encouragement, for parents who have a child with Down syndrome, autism, a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD) and other intellectual and developmental disabilities. As a parent, remember you don’t have to navigate the special needs path alone, help is out there!

That’s what is in my noggin this week! 🙂
~Teresa

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Instagram @nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Education and Special Needs

Blog #231~Special Needs Tips for Making Accommodations in the Classroom

Blog #231 Special Needs Tips for Making Accommodations in the Classroom

Last week, I focused on 5 back to school tips for special needs parents. For today’s post I want to put a lens on what accommodations look like and their importance in the classroom setting for a student with special needs.

Accommodations are changes that remove barriers and provide a student with equal access to learning. As a parent, it is essential to make sure that agreed upon accommodations and supports are written into your child’s IEP, and in place before the first day of school.

My son Nick is 25 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD). Over the years he had many accommodations to support his learning and navigation in the school environment. Nick didn’t walk until age 3 1/2 years old due to low muscle tone (a trait of having Down syndrome). In pre-school, the IEP team made an accommodation to transport Nick from point A to B in the building, and in/out of the car line.  Accommodations can come in many forms to support intellectual and developmental disabilities.

visual support ring

Here are some examples of accommodations that can be used in the classroom:

*Communication Notebook and daily reports sent back and forth from school to home

*Classroom Schedule,  Individual Visual Schedules and Social Stories

Nick fist bump AID                   social story working desk

*Alternative Media Tools- Flash cards, board games, computer programs, learning apps/games, AAC (augmentative and alternative communication) and assistive technology devices, PECS (picture exchange communication), sign language, etc.

nick aac

*Sensory Tools help with self-regulation- Figits, stress balls, pencil toppers, tangle puzzles, weighted vests or lap pads, nubby sit cushions, stability balls, etc.

alternative seating

*Motor Breaks and Sensory/Quiet Corners– Build breaks into a student’s schedule. Some can be motor breaks or a sensory/quiet break depending on the need. Equip with items such as rocking or bean bag chairs, mini-trampolines, swings, weighted blankets, noise cancelling earphones, need a break icon etc.

*Visual aids, worksheets and paraprofessionals/aides to assist to accompany lesson objectives and test taking.

*Transition tools- Early hall passing before the bell rings, transition objects, visual schedules, visual timers, etc.

transition timer

*Choice boards to encourage decision making and independent learning skills.

*Work and Reward Charts:

working for chart   first then work

Building in accommodations and supports into your student’s IEP and classroom setting help enhance learning in a positive school environment. Often, individuals with autism and a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD, like my son, thrive with the use of visual prompts to navigate their days more smoothly. The right accommodations make it possible to have a successful learning environment that is less stressful.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa 

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Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Education and Special Needs

Back to School Tips for Special Needs Parents

Back to School Tips for Special Needs Parents

Back to school helpful tips

It’s the time of year when parents get busy preparing their kids for the new school year. There is added stress and things to consider when you have a child who has intellectual and developmental disabilities. You can help your child by planning ahead, getting organized and putting visual supports in place before school starts.

Here are 5 tips to ensure a smooth start to the new school year for your child with special needs: https://nickspecialneeds.com/tag/haircuts-and-special-needs-child/

Navigating the new school year, which may include changes in staff, venues and classmates can be challenging. But with careful preparation, parents can guide their child to have a successful start, with less anxiety and more confidence!

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa 

Follow Nick:

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Posted in Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

DS-ASD Behavior Management

DS-ASD Behavior Management

smile emoji thumbs up

Behavior problems are common for individuals with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD). Speech deficits may cause a child to exhibit unwanted behaviors to express emotions of frustration and not being heard. I’ve experienced many behaviors with my son Nick, who is 25 years old and has a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD. While Nick continues to challenge me with undesirable behaviors, I have learned a lot about how to better manage them. This week, here are 5 steps you can take to discover the causes of a problem behavior and prevent it from occurring.

Click here to learn how you can better manage behaviors associated with individuals having a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD:

https://nickspecialneeds.com/2018/08/06/blog-212ds-asd-behavior-management/

Challenging behaviors like throwing, dropping and breaking items are tough to deal with, but once you determine what function this behavior serves, you can put a plan in place to curtail it. A good BCBA certified behavior specialist can guide you through the process by doing a Functional Behavior Analysis (FBA) and creating a positive Behavior Support Plan (BSP). Getting on top of these behaviors will create a calmer and less frustrating living environment for the whole family.

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

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Instagram https://www.instagram.com/nickdsautism/

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Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Fun Side of Nick, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs

DS-ASD~ Summer Vacation Highlights

DS-ASD~ Summer Vacation Highlights

OBX flags 2019

We are back after a two week vacation from Virginia and the Outer Banks, NC. It was so relaxing to be off the grid and enjoy time with family. My son Nick is 25 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD). As a family, we have always made a commitment to travel with our son. It can be challenging for a child with special needs to navigate airports, hotels and unfamiliar venues. But there are things you can put in place to make vacations go smoother…..

In my last blog entry you can access my top 7 vacation travel tips for families: https://nickspecialneeds.com/2019/06/17/ds-asd7-vacation-tips-for-special-needs-families/ 

Here are some of the highlights from our summer vacation in Virginia and the Outer Banks (OBX):

In Virginia, we enjoyed the wonderful hospitality of Nick’s Aunt Ali and Uncle Ron with beautiful views, kayaking on the James River, great food and relaxing in the peaceful country…..

 

Highlights from the Outer Banks, in Duck, OBX:

At OBX we enjoyed beach and pool time, great company, delicious meals and a nice birthday celebration dinner on the sound side of OBX. Nick did well tolerating the sandy beaches this year, and spent more time than ever with us as a family!  We put Nick in tennis shoes to make his way out on the hot sand, with a texture that tends to bother him from a sensory standpoint. He did well hanging out both under the umbrella and out at the water’s edge……….

Nick and Dad OBX beach 2019   Nick and Anna OBX 2019

Dinner on the sound side of OBX at Aqua Restaurant and Spa, including Nick with his Dad & Mom, Uncle Ron & Aunt Ali, Cousins Anna & Sam and Nick’s brother and girlfriend Hank & Kristin…..

Aqua Restaurant and Spa features excellent food, wine, spa treatments and sunsets. Thank you both- to my son Hank for treating me to a pedicure overlooking the sound, and to Ali for the relaxing (and much needed) Swedish massage. As a mother of a child with special needs, it’s crucial to take time for some TLC and pamper yourself. Moving forward, I’m going to make it a priority to do this more than once a year on my birthday. It is good for the soul! 🙂

Sunrise at Duck, OBX….

OBX sunrise 2019

We are very grateful and blessed to have the opportunity to spend vacation each summer with Ali and Ron hosting in Virginia and OBX. Anna, thank you for cooking and introducing us to some wonderful & tasty vegan dishes. The familiar venues help Nick feel secure in his surroundings. This predictability helps him to be less anxious on vacations and makes for a more relaxing experience for all of us.

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

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