Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Speech and Occupational Therapy

Blog #121~10 Years of Autism

Blog #121~ 10 Years of Autism

Last Saturday, the Chicago White Sox gave a replica of the 2005 World Series Ring to all the fans. This was to commemorate the 10 year anniversary of the Sox winning the World Series.

This sure beats the heck out of any bobble head they’ve given out…

White Sox Ring

I slipped the heavy ring on, that Al brought home from the game. I thought back on the week that the White Sox won the American League Championship securing their spot in the World Series. That was the week, that we got the firm diagnosis that our son Nick, had autism. Nick is now 21 years old and has Down syndrome along with autism. A lot has happened in the last 10 years, and I’ve learned plenty in the process.

Sox  Nick and mom

What about the 11 years prior to the diagnosis of Nick having autism? Well, when he was 5 years old we had him tested but it was found that he was not on the autism spectrum because he was highly social and the oddities were due to having Sensory Integration Dysfunction.

According to the Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation (SPD Foundation), “Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD, formerly known as “sensory integration dysfunction”)

is a condition that exists when sensory signals don’t get organized into appropriate responses. Pioneering occupational therapist and neuroscientist A. Jean Ayres, PhD, likened SPD to a neurological “traffic jam” that prevents certain parts of the brain from receiving the information needed to interpret sensory information correctly. A person with SPD finds it difficult to process and act upon information received through the senses, which creates challenges in performing countless everyday tasks.”

Nick sought out input by tapping objects, walking heavily and stimming with his toys to help organize his senses. His occupational therapist worked with him weekly providing him with a sensory diet.

photo (115)

In addition, Nick also has Verbal Apraxia of Speech (an acquired oral motor speech disorder affecting an individual’s ability to translate conscious speech plans into motor plans, which results in limited and difficult speech ability). The sensory and speech conditions blurred the lines, therefore the autism didn’t come to view at the time.

As Nick entered the throes of puberty, it became evident that there was more to his behaviors than just Down syndrome. That’s when we sought out Little Friends Center for Autism to do an assessment 10 years ago. Looking back I had a hunch he did. However, part of me wasn’t ready to face such a daunting diagnosis as autism. We got the report from Little Friends the day that the White Sox won the ALC championship. That report was the key to opening up a new world for us.

The official diagnosis of autism, allowed us to request more specific services for Nick. This included a better communication system, behavior plan, training, finding the NADS (National Association for Down Syndrome) support group for dual diagnosis families, and respite care through the state. With the help of Little Friends, I attended training sessions to help Nick foster independence and better communication. More importantly, I learned how to get my son toilet trained once and for all, and out of those Depends diapers.

Nick has grown a lot in the last 10 years. Things are not near perfect, nor will they ever be. We face our daily  battles. He is still stimming and raising autism awareness everywhere he goes. But the meltdowns are fewer and far between. Nick is happy and a funny guy. And when I see him standing there in his boxer briefs I am reminded of perhaps the greatest accomplishments in my life. I’m proud to say that we are done with what our autism community refers to as “Code Brown”

No more poop smears!

poop icon

If you are a parent and have a hunch that your child may have autism, this is my wish for you. That you go get an assessment, take that piece of paper and use it as your ticket to get the services to help your child.  Seeing where Nick is today is a sweet victory that I savor.  It feels like I’m winning the series in Nick’s world.  That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa 🙂

Author:

Teresa is the mother of two boys. Her youngest son, Nick is 23 years old and has special needs including Down syndrome, autism and verbal apraxia. She is a parent advocate, speaker and writer who is currently working on the memoir of raising her son, Nick. You can follow Nick world on our Facebook page and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice of Autism. Find Nick on Instagram@ #nickdsaustism, Twitter @tjunnerstall.

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