Posted in Adult Day Programs for Special Needs, Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #216~Putting Social Stories Into Action

Blog #216~Putting Social Stories Into Action

Recently I had to take a page out of my own playbook.  I took both iPads and locked them up for an entire week.  My son, Nick repeatedly throws and drops his iPads when he is done or the battery dies.   Nick is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD).  During that week, I created a social story designed to teach him how to take care of his iPads.

A social story is a visual support that helps individuals understand new events, and reinforces a desired skill, task, or behavior. They are useful for individuals that have Down syndrome, autism or other intellectual/developmental disabilities. Over the years, we’ve used social stories to help Nick navigate new situations like starting back to school, doctors and dentist appointments, vacations, and independent living skills such as showering and brushing teeth. Social stories provide a blueprint as to what will occur and what is expected from a behavior standpoint. Knowing what will happen and what’s expected, will also help to reduce anxiety.

In this case, the social story was designed to help Nick understand what is expected of his behavior, and why it’s important to make good choices.  Here is Nick’s iPad social story:

iPad social story

In Blog #214 you can read how to make a social story, click here to view:

https://nickspecialneeds.com/2018/08/20/blog-214-how-to-make-a-social-story/

Social stories should be broken down into steps using visuals and succinct wording that depict the who, what, where, when, why and how an event or behavior needs to happen.  Review the social story several times with the child before the event, new routine or behavior is to occur.

After a week with no iPads, Nick was excited to get them back.  Before this occurred I read the social story several times.  Nick followed along and pointed to the basket that he needed to put his iPads in when he was finished using them.  I made sure to stay in close proximity when he was using his iPads, to redirect him in case he decided to drop or throw them.

So, did the social story work help to curb the iPad drops and throws?  Absolutely, it reduced the incidences by 80% in just one week.  That’s a huge improvement.  Nick returned his iPads to the basket frequently, and in some cases he at least set it on the table instead of chucking it.  This indicates that he has impulse control and able to make better choices.   He received lots of verbal praises and elbow bumps for making good choices.

happy choice sad choice

Each day,  I review the social story before Nick gets to use his iPads to reinforce making good choices.  In a few weeks, I will introduce a new social story to deal with another behavior area we struggle with around the house.  Many parents of children with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism have trouble with dropping, swiping and knocking over items.  Nick’s behavior in this area has increased over the last couple of months.  This will be a tough one to tackle, stay tuned…….

Cats Earth was flat

Remember that the goal in using a social story is to teach the behavior or outcome that you are expecting from the child.  Give them a script for success for making good choices.  Keep in mind, when introducing a social story, to use one at a time consistently, before adding more.

At my son’s  adult day program, they are using a social story with positive reinforcement for making good choices.  Nick has quite a rap sheet pulling fire alarms, with over 50 pulls since third grade.  Each day, the staff reviews the social story and walk the halls with him, encouraging him to “keep walking with hands to self”.  This story was developed by myself and the ABA therapist on staff at his day program.  The story reminds Nick (using visuals again), that it’s not nice to pull fire alarms, as it scares his friends,  hurts their ears, and that it is hard for some clients to move.  If he pulls an alarm, Nick must exit the building and go next door, so he doesn’t see or hear the fire trucks.  When he makes good choices, he earns a happy face and gets a reward at the end of the day:

nick social story sprite reward for fire alarms

Not to jinx things, but so far, the fire alarm social story is working well. 🙂

The happy face visuals have been effective for Nick, and  pairing it with the idea of making good choices.  Nick likes to please, but at the same time he craves attention, and will often get it with negative behaviors.  So the focus on targeting good behaviors with the icon will be carried thru to the dropping social story in the near future.

Social stories can help guide a child to understand what will happen, where and what is expected of their behavior. It’s a great visual tool for teaching new skills and routines.  They can help to guide your child to smooth and successful experiences both at home, school and in the community.  Do you have a child that likes to swipe, drop or throw things?  What’s the most expensive thing they have destroyed?  It’s not easy, navigating a child with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  Working with a BCBA certified behavior therapist to develop strategies and social stories can help improve behaviors significantly.  Your child is never to old to learn and improve their behaviors.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 

~Teresa 🙂
Follow Nick:

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Instagram @nickdsautism
Twitter @tjunnerstall
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Doctors and Dentists, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Feeding, Personal Hygiene, Toileting, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #214~ How to Make a Social Story

Blog #214~How to Make a Social Story

A social story is a visual support that helps individuals understand new events, and reinforces a desired skill, task, or behavior.  They are useful for individuals that have Down syndrome, autism or other intellectual/developmental disabilities.  My son, Nick is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  Over the years, we’ve used social stories to help him navigate new situations like starting back to school, doctors and dentist appointments, vacations, and independent living skills such as showering and brushing teeth.  Social stories provide a blueprint as to what will occur and what is expected from a behavior standpoint.  Knowing what will happen and what’s expected, will also help to reduce anxiety.

social-stories go to class

As you can see from the illustration above, a social story should use succinct wording and may include visual, depending on the ability and age of the child.  Individuals with autism often understand better with pictures.  Support teachers and speech therapists are great resources for creating social stories for your child.  Google Images and Pinterest both offer many social stories to help you get started.

How to Make a Social Story:

1. Choose a specific event (starting school, a doctor visit, hygiene routine).

2. Break the story down into steps, including who, what, (and why depending on the child’s cognition level).  Use the pronouns “I” or “we”.

3. State the desired behaviors that you want the person reading the story to do for each step.

4. Include visuals either on-line or actual pictures of the setting.

5. Show the desired outcome, this may include a reward or verbal praise like “good job”.

6. Read the story together with the child repeatedly for several weeks before the event or new routine occurs.

hand_washing_routine

social story morning routine

Some individuals may respond better to video modeling.  Making a video of the desired task or behavior can help a child learn a new routine, adjust to a new environment or learn a skill.  As with social stories, the script should be simple in wording and broken down step by step.

Both social stories and video based modeling can help teach new skills, venues and routines.

Here are a few more ideas for using social stories or video modeling to teach your child:

*New job skill

*Fine motor tasks (cutting food, buttoning a shirt, pouring milk, handwriting)

*Gross motor skills (swimming strokes, riding a bike, yoga, sports)

*Grooming and hygiene routines (brush teeth, shower, toileting, dressing)

*Morning, afternoon and bedtime routines

*Household chores

*School Routines ( new school, picture day, assemblies, new curriculum in PE)

*Visits to doctor, dentist, blood draws, haircuts

*Community trips, vacations and special events

*Teaching social skills (playing games with peers, turn taking)

When you know what is going to occur, you feel less anxious.  Fear can lead to avoidance for all of us.  Utilizing social stories can help guide a child to understand what will happen, where and what is expected of their behavior.  It’s a great visual tool for teaching new skills and routines.  As the new school year begins, create a social story that includes actual pictures of the school building, classroom, lunchroom, gym and any other areas your child will be in.  Social stories will help to guide your child to smooth and successful experiences both at home, school and in the community.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram @nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Education and Special Needs, Parenting Special Needs

Blog #213~Back to School Tips for Special Needs Parents

Blog #213~Back to School Tips for Special Needs Parents

There are a few more areas to consider when sending a child with special needs back to school.  Children with intellectual and developmental disabilities may not be able to understand change and transitions related to school.  The student’s language skills may be limited and they might have difficulty expressing emotions.  This can all lead to anxiety which can result in behavior problems.  You can help your child by planning ahead, getting organized and putting visual supports in place for the new school year. Here are 5 tips to ensure a smooth start to the new school year for your child with special needs.

backtoschool94

5 Back to School Tips for Special Needs Parents:

1. Look over your child’s IEP (Individualized Education Plan) before school begins. The IEP outlines academic and functional goals, supports needed, accommodations and services. Reach out to your child’s case manager/IEP coordinator or Support Teacher, and ask specifically how these will be implemented, and how data will be tracked.  If there is a Behavior Support Plan (BSP), review it, and make sure that all staff members working with your child have as well.  Note anything that might need to be tweaked in both plans, and share with the school staff. Summer and holiday breaks can often lead to regression in behaviors that may need to be addressed.

2. Arrange a visit to the classroom before school begins.  Provide a profile/resume sheet about your child for the staff, containing any information that will help them understand their likes, dislikes, behavior and communication concerns.  Look for visual supports and a schedule posted in the classroom to enhance learning and understanding.  You can request that a social story (pictures or video); be made of the settings that your child will be in at school, (classroom, lunch room, gym, sensory area, etc.).  It also helps to include pictures of support staff and classroom peers (if possible), in the social story. If a child with autism can see it in picture and/or written form, they will better understand it.  Visual supports, social stories and schedules all act as blueprints to help your child navigate their day.  This will help them understand what is expected and occur, leading to reduced anxiety levels for your child.  The support teacher/ case manager can make these for you to read with your child before school starts.

Social Story for Back to School:

 

 

3. During the classroom meet and greet, arrange a mode of communication with your child’s teacher.  In the past I have used both email, texting and a communication notebook which goes back and forth.  My son, Nick has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  His verbal language skills are limited.  The communication notebook gives the child a voice that describes what their day has been like at school, and how they are doing at home.  This is especially helpful, if your child didn’t sleep well, and you can give the teacher a head’s up, to incorporate more breaks in the day if needed.  In addition to a communication notebook, the teacher can create a custom daily report to share with parents.  Depending on the skill level of your child, words or pictures can be used and looked at together at home after school each day:

Daily Report Charts:

4. Start Early! Get school supplies, clothes and shoes shopping done and haircut at least a week before the start of school.  Having a child with special needs often means a lot of angst over haircuts. For Nick the stress of getting a haircut use to affect him for several days afterwards.  Fortunately, now that my son is older the haircuts are much easier.  Maturity and a good set of clippers have made haircuts successful.  I’m super excited to share with you the new hair clippers that are a GAME CHANGER!  The Remington Short Cut Pro Self-Haircut Kit is cordless, smooth, quiet and quick as it takes more hair in a single pass.  It’s the most sensory friendly clippers we’ve ever used on our son.  5 Minutes and no tears!

 

The night before school starts, have your child help lay out the clothes, organize the school supplies and pick out lunch/snack choices.  This will help to set the tone for  a smooth start to the day and this helps especially at six o’clock in the morning. One thing that was NEVER EARLY; the school bus. Make sure you have carved out your schedule accordingly and have something for your child to do while you wait. On average, we’ve waited 30-45 minutes for the bus to get to our house the first few days of school.

5. Consider doing volunteer work at your child’s school. It is fun and you can see firsthand how your child is doing in the classroom.

Here are a few school volunteer ideas:
*Holiday Parties
*Art Awareness Presenter
*Chaperone Field Trips
*Field Days
*Picture Day
*Work book fairs
*Library aid
*Special Olympics Practices
*Assist Case Manager/ Support Teacher- Making copies, laminating, helping to create classroom supports.

Taking a few extra steps to get organized, familiarizing yourself with the IEP/ Behavior  support plan, visiting the classroom, and providing visuals for your child will lead to a smooth start to the new school year.  Getting involved as a classroom volunteer is rewarding and a great way to interact with student peers and school staff.  Careful planning, organization and providing visual supports will make things easier for your child starting back to school.  Do you have any back to school tips or tricks for your child with special needs? I’d love to hear them.

That’s what is in my noggin this week!
~Teresa 🙂

back to school bus

Follow Nick on Social Media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram @nickdsaustim

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

Posted in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #184~ Addressing Problem Behaviors in Individuals with DS/ASD

Blog #184~Addressing Problem Behaviors in Individuals with DS/ASD

Problem behaviors in individuals with Down syndrome and autism (DS/ASD), are very common.  Speech deficits, make it difficult to communicate wants and needs.  Often individuals with DS/ASD, may exhibit problem behaviors to communicate something.  Last week I participated in a webinar about addressing such behaviors, led by Sam Towers (http://sam@towersbehavior.com), that was hosted by The Down Syndrome Association of Minnesota.  Here is a summary of this webinar on addressing problem behaviors in individuals with DS/ASD.

First of all, it is important to build rapport.   Establish a friendship with kindness, and positive activities that the individual enjoys.  This will provide the basis for teaching the person, that there are other ways, besides problem behavior, for achieving goals.  Sam suggested a 10:1 ratio of praising good behaviors.  Praise encourages the individual to do it again.

Why do people use problem behaviors?

1.Get attention

2.Get something

3.Escape or avoid something unpleasant

4.Get a pleasant sensation

All behaviors allow a person to achieve a goal, because the payoff is reinforcement.  You get what you pay more attention to.  The idea is to avoid letting problem behaviors have a payoff.  So, focus ALOT more on addressing the good behaviors.  This can be done by building skills, through teaching replacement behaviors.  If a child is throwing things to get attention, the replacement behavior could be to teach them to tap you on the shoulder or use their communication device.

My son Nick is 23 years old and has a dual diagnosis of DS/ASD.  He has many behaviors that are used to get attention or something, and provide a pleasant sensation.  Part of the autism piece is sensory related.  Flushing the toilet repeatedly, pushing the microwave fan or phone intercom buttons are ways that he stims, which is a form of self-entertainment.  One suggestion, for this would be to teach other ways for him to entertain himself.  Some supports that I recommend, are to use social stories, redirect to an AAC (Aumentative Alternative Communication) device, PECS (Picture Exchange Communication) book, or create a choice board.

Choice Boards:

choice boards

If an individual is trying to get out of an activity, they may exhibit behaviors like self-injury, yelling, or stop-drop and plop.  In these cases, it’s important to provide supports like, a first-then charts, “take a break” card, noise cancelling headphones, a visual schedule, or a timed timer.

timer app    first then  1,2,3,4 Sprite

Bottom line, you can’t let the problem behavior become the payoff.  The single most effective way to get rid of a problem behavior, is to arrange things so that there is no payoff (reinforcement) for the behavior. Completely withholding reinforcement can be difficult, and often leads to an increase in the behavior.  This is called an extinction boost.  But if you stick to your guns, this will result in the behavior decreasing.  The key is to be consistent in not rewarding the undesirable behavior.  If it is reinforced intermittently, it will cause the behavior to be more long-lasting, because there is still some payoff for the individual.

Understanding the reasons people use problem behaviors, building skills and supports to teach replacement behaviors, praising 10:1 good behaviors, and arranging things so that there is no payoff for the problem behavior are all great tools for addressing problem behaviors in individuals with DS/ASD.  Here are a few resources which may also help:

Edward Carr Book    Social Story Book  visual strategies book

When Down Syndrome and Autism Intersect,
edited by Margaret Froehlke and Robin Zaborek:  

down syndrome and autism intersect

A special thank you to the Down Syndrome Association of Minnesota and Sam Towers of Towers Behavior Services for an informative webinar.  Now, it’s time to make a new choice board for Nick.  Have a great week, everyone.

That’s what is in my noggin this week! 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism on Facebook and Pinterest

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@tjunnerstall on Twitter

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Behavior/ ABA, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, IEP (Indivdualized Education Plan)

Blog #179~Down syndrome and Autism-Unlocking Your Child’s Potential

Blog #179~Down syndrome and Autism-Unlocking Your Child’s Potential

When your child has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism, the game changes.  Speech may be limited or even non-verbal, which may lead to behavior problems.  Sensory issues can be extreme and interfere with social interactions and learning.  My son, Nick is 23 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  His speech is limited, and he is a sensory seeker.  Over the years, with the help of some amazing teachers, therapists, and autism behaviorist specialists, he has developed skills which have allowed him to contribute both working in his adult day program, and here at home.

So how do you find the key to unlock your child’s potential?

padlock-unlocked_318-40940The key lies in identifying your child’s strengths, and working to build upon them.  First of all, just because my son’s speech is limited doesn’t mean he can’t communicate.  One of Nick’s assets is his receptive language, which is the ability to understand information.  Many of his goals in his IEP (Individualized Education Plan), were planned around using this strength when he was in school.  Nick was able to develop skills to become more independent in self-help, and other jobs both at home and school.  These skills were enhanced by using educational materials and supports that were written into his IEP.  Such materials included a PECS book (Picture Exchange Communication System) with training for staff, parents and child, Augmentative Alternative Communication (AAC) devices,  task strips, social stories, a picture schedule, video modeling, and a reward system.  All of these supports helped Nick to navigate his routine and built upon his functional and independent livings skills.

APE swimming 006 (4)

Besides his receptive language, Nick’s other strengths are his desire to please and take the initiative.  He is a taskmaster!  When Nick was younger, his teachers pointed out how good he was at matching.  A lot of his goals were structured around this.  Nick has always had a keen eye, and notices where everything goes around the house.  Anytime the batteries died on one of his musical toys, he would go to the kitchen drawer, pull out the screwdriver and hand it to me with the toy.  As he grew older, I recall him nudging his older brother over to help unload the dishwasher.  He knew which cabinet every single plate, cup, pot, pan and utensil were stored.  Shortly thereafter, I let him take over the chore (with no complaints from his older brother, Hank). 🙂

Nick still takes great pride in unloading the dishwasher today!

Nick dishwasher two

Here are some other ways the taskmaster takes initiative:

Nick getting out ingredients and utensils for his salad….

Nick dinner prep

As soon as he saw the pan of water on the stove, he went to the pantry and pulled out the ingredients to make pasta…..

Nick past cooking

Using his strength of taking the initiative, we have built upon this to create other jobs both at home and in the community.  When he was in school, his teachers recognized his sensory seeking needs and channeled them by doing “heavy work”.  An occupational therapist can assist with ideas to implement a sensory diet into your child’s routine. Nick likes to throw and swipe things (and still does).  It has helped to find activities with heavy work or that mimic this sensory need.

Here are a few of the jobs that does:

*Recycling (replacement behavior for throwing)

*Can crushing (sensory and motor activity and replacement behavior for throwing)

*Carry laundry basket and load washing machine (heavy work/ organizing)

*Put away groceries (organizing activity)

*Empty Dishwasher (organizing and sensory activity)

*Cleaning/ wiping down countertops and windows (organizing activity)

*Vacuuming (heavy work which is calming)

Nick working at a residence facility in high school….

Nick vacumming_Tabor Hills (3)

Nick doing volunteer work at GiGi’s playhouse with in his current adult day program…

nick-cleaning-gigis

There is so much your child can learn when you identify their strengths and unique talents.  When you find what motivates your child, you can build and expand upon it.  Work with your child’s IEP team, therapists and autism specialist, to identify those areas.  Then together as a team, create a plan with specific and measurable goals, that will enable your child to grow and be successful.  Unlock your child’s potential, and watch them soar!  That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Education and Special Needs

Blog #87~Special Needs Parent Checklist for Visiting a New School

Blog #87~Special Needs Parent Checklist for Visiting a New School  

It’s almost spring…… that time of year when the scent of IEP’s are in the air.  IEP stands for Individualized Education Plan.

brace yourself IEP

The team as a whole looks at the student’s current level of functioning and together design goals and supports needed to provide appropriate education for the student.  The placement of a child with special needs should always be in the least restrictive environment possible.

Nick has Down syndrome and autism.  He uses a visual schedule to navigate through the school…….

APE swimming 006 (4)

Parents with a child who has special needs can arrange to visit schools and see what the classroom environment looks like.   Here are some tips and helpful questions that should be asked on the tour.  I would suggest designating one notebook to take to any meetings and trainings related to your child with special needs.

My trusty, battered notebook……. 🙂

IMG01

Questions to ask on school visit: 

*What are the location, size and physical layout of the classroom(s)?

*How many students are in the classroom?  What is the ratio of students: adults?

*What instructional methods and materials will be used?

*How will the curriculum be modified for a student with special needs?

*What assistive technology is available?

*What behavior techniques and plans will be used?

*What does the school day look like?  (Ask for a printed schedule and to sit in on classes.)

*What kinds of inclusion opportunities do children in special education classrooms have to interact with general education students? 

Observation of class and school:   

*Watch the dynamics of the classroom.  How does the teacher interact with students?  Does the teacher individualize instruction? 

*What activities were children engaged? Would they be appropriate for your child?

*Do the classrooms and staff seem cheerful?

*Is student work displayed and is the classroom organized or would it be too distracting for your child?

*Are the curriculum, equipment, technology and educational supports up to date?

*How well are the facilities maintained? (Clean bathrooms, lighting, safe grounds, etc…)

*Is there a sensory room available in the classroom or school building? 

Once a school and classroom placement decision is made be sure and get pictures or do a video of the new setting for your child.  This social story should include the entry, locker, classrooms, lunch room, gym and any other relevant areas the child will be using in the school.  Review the social story or video several times before the first day of classes.

Here’s Nick visiting the middle school back in 6th grade. He was skeptical about this new environment as indicated by not wanting to remove his coat and keeping it zipped up to the top……..

Nick at Granger

As a parent of a child with special needs, remember that you know your child best.  You have the right to get in there and see what the classroom environment looks like in order to make an informed decision at your child’s IEP meeting.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Tech Stuff/Apps and Video Based Instruction

Blog #80~Getting Organized Along With My Autistic Child

Blog #80~ Getting Organized Along With My Autistic Child

Is it odd that I like to have all the labels turned straight in the food pantry and the towels stacked perfectly in the bathroom closet?  My hangers might just be color-coded (white=shirts, gray=pants, teal=capri length pants).  I wasn’t always so compulsive. 

I’ve touched on my theory about this in previous blog posts. Simply this, I need to feel in control in my home and creating order helps keep me grounded.  Having a child with Down syndrome and autism under your roof is not exactly a “Zen” environment.  Nick’s world can be chaotic.  Just go back to the April 2012 archives and read Blog #3~Getting your Goat for a little taste of crazy. 🙂

This is just one of many things Nick has dumped on the floor…..

photo (105)

So over the weekend, I got on a roll. Operation Re-boot 2014 inspired me to get organized.  First stop= Clean out the paper pile and mail that accumulated over the holidays and made my “to do list” for the week.  Next, Put away the Christmas gifts and stuff from the Florida trip that I stashed in the dining room…….

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I opened the medicine cabinet to put the cold meds back (that had been sitting in the dining room for over a week).  Suddenly, an avalanche of allergy boxes spilled out and bonked me on the head.  Guess what the next stop was?

Wow, it’s been a long time since the medicine cabinet was cleaned out!  Nice expiration date…. 11/06 on the Tylenol bottle…..What the? 

IMG01 (2)

Voila, purged, organized and labeled!

IMG01 (10)

Next stop= The island of misfit socks. Maybe some will reunite with their mate…..

IMG01 (4)

Last stop= Clean out the fridge

IMG01 (11)

After a long day in full steam OCD mode, I felt lighter and more in control of my living space.  The chi energy was once again flowing freely~~~~~~~~ aaahhhh!

IMG01 (12)

Getting organized helps us to better plan daily activities and use our time more effectively.  It’s not easy for some people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).  The nervous system is not always in sync which makes things difficult to process sensory information.  This can lead to feelings of disorganization, agitation and being overwhelmed. According to the National Autistic Society, “Challenges are found in processing information, predicting consequences of an action, understanding the concept of time and executive function (focus on details instead of the whole picture).”

Most of us use certain strategies to help organize our day.  I use an old school calendar that is color-coded in the kitchen.  At a glance events are highlighted and easier to spot. Teaching fitness classes=green, appointments=pink, birthdays=orange, vacations=purple, etc…  Color coding and other strategies can also be equally as effective for people with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Here are some practical ways to teach and implement organization:

Visual supports

Social Stories give a blueprint for what is expected for behavior, what is on schedule and changes in routines.

Pictures (Picture Exchange System called PECS)

photo (106)

Note Nick’s room has pictures labeled on his dresser to help him find and put away his own clothes.  Teaching organizational skills to persons with autism fosters independence…

IMG01 (2)

Lists

Written or visual with pictures keep persons on task and also registers achievements.

Electronic Devices

Phone and iPod apps are available to make schedules, set alarms and timers and act as general reminders.  See Blog #52~Tech Time located in the April 2013 archives for specific suggestions. Here’s one…….

picture schedule app

Task boxes, envelopes and files

Store media devices, work bins and personal items in set places helps to teach responsibility.  Nick’s area includes his PECS Communication book, media storage box and theSTOP Box (which I hand him when it is time to surrender an item and transition).

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Nick’s work bins that he can retrieve and navigate independently….

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Getting things organized helps all of us feel more in control and makes for a more efficient use of our time.  Putting strategies in place to help persons having autism spectrum disorder can make a huge difference.  Their world becomes easier to navigate, which in turn lessons anxiety.  It’s all about staying in the Zen zone.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

zen

~Teresa

Posted in Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Education and Special Needs, Feeding, Personal Hygiene, Toileting, Tech Stuff/Apps and Video Based Instruction

Blog #52~ Tech Time

geek pic

Blog #52~Tech Time

A few weeks ago at the National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS) Retreat the guest speaker did a presentation on using video based instruction and mobile technologies to support learners with Down syndrome and other developmental disabilities.  Toni Van Laarhoven, an associate professor in the Department of Special and Early Education at Northern Illinois University (NIU) gave us some great information on how to implement it.

Video modeling for can be used for teaching a variety of social, academic, and functional skills.  In the April 2012 archives, Blog #5~Ready, Set, Action, I wrote about how effective these have been in teaching Nick a variety of job skills.  He learned how to unload the dishwasher, load the washing machine and how to use the vacuum cleaner.

Nick vacumming_Tabor Hills (5)

Before video modeling we used social stories.  Basically this is like a script that you want the child to follow.  With Nick also having autism, it helps him to see it in picture form so he can better understand.  Nick has a thing for sneezing right in your face on purpose.  His teacher made this social story, here is part of it…….. aaaaachoooooo 🙂

photo (115)

These visual supports were effective, but his interest level when reading social stories was nothing compared to when he started watching the video models.

Here are a few ideas  I came up with for video modeling:

Teach a job skill

Teach a fine motor skill (cutting food, buttoning a shirt, pour milk, handwriting)

Teach a gross motor skill (swimming strokes, riding a bike, yoga positions.)

Grooming routines (brushing teeth, washing face, dressing.)

Bedtime routine

Change in routine (picture day at school, new curriculum unit in P.E., new school)

Visit to doctor, dentist, blood draws, and haircuts

Trip to the zoo, baseball game, mall, movie theater

Appropriate leisure activities to do at home (watch a movie, computer/X-Box)

Teach social skills (playing games with peers, turn taking)

It’s best to choose one behavior or skill to work on at a time.  Have the child watch the movie before engaging in the activity on a consistent basis.  For a job skill, many students have a video on their hand held device (iPod) and can follow the prompts as they work.  Ultimately, using video models can foster greater independence.

Shooting the videos can be done using an adult or peer model going through the sequence.  Simple verbal prompts should be provided.  For example, for pouring milk you can script it like this.

  1. Go to cabinet and get a cup.
  2. Go to the refrigerator and get milk.
  3. Open cap and pour milk in cup.
  4. Put cap on milk.
  5. Put milk container back in the refrigerator.

Another way to use video modeling is to make a video resume.  Toni made one of her sister who has significant disabilities.  This video showed in detail her routine.  The narrator pointed out specific details, likes, dislikes that added clarity to how she navigates her day.  This would be extremely helpful for a new staff, teacher, and direct care provider.  A few years ago, Toni’s NIU students put together a video resume of Nick called Project MY VOICE.  Like Toni’s sister, his showed what he did at school, his likes (music, community outings, etc..) and pointed out things that might upset him (saying “no” to him, changes in schedule, etc…)  Nick was very proud to show the video at his IEP meeting that year. 🙂

There tons of programs and apps that are available for assisting persons with special needs.  Here are just a few that have been recommended to me:

*Follow a schedule with Picture Scheduler:

picture schedule app

*iPrompts- Visual support, schedules, picture prompting for autism and special education.

*Artiks Pics-Vocabulary flashcards, memory games

*www.autismspeaks.org/autism-apps

*First Then Visual Schedule:

first then app

*ABA (Applied Behavior Analysis) and educational apps:

fruit app

happy sad app pic

Alphabet Tracing:

alphabet tracing

Sensory Fun, Light Box App:

light box app

Silly Fun, Talking Tom 2 (Nick’s going to love this one. Tom just cut one here, stinky) 🙂

talking tom

The list goes on and on, you get the idea.  There’s an app for just about everything.

Video based instruction, using mobile devices and prompting systems are effective tools in helping our kids navigate their world to become more independent. Put the power in their hands! That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Education and Special Needs

Blog #19~ Back to School Tips for Special Needs Kids

Back-to-School

Blog #19~ Back to School Tips for Special Needs Kids

I love scrolling the Facebook wall and seeing all of the first day of school pictures.  Kids all spiffed up in their new back to school clothes and shiny shoes.  Leaving the subdivision last Thursday, I glanced over at the bus stop filled with elementary kids and their parents all with cameras in hand.  As moms that is what we do, take that moment and freeze frame it.

I did my share of taking those pictures, Nick, age 6….

      

Spiffy!

It’s hard to believe that Nick is starting his senior in high school. He has Down syndrome and autism and is in a self contained classroom.   And yes, I did take a picture of him.

It’s a little blurry because he was rocking back and forth.

I never get sad when Nick goes back to school.  In fact I do the happy dance celebrating my regained independence, (not to mention actually being able to hear the sound of a pin drop after the bus takes him away).

A couple of things have changed over the years. I don’t feel the need to have everything so perfect anymore. Also, his school supplies are no longer the typical things like rulers, scissors, pencils or wide ruled notebook paper.  His curriculum in the self-contained classroom has shifted from academic to functional.

Nick’s school supplies….

In last week’s blog, I mentioned that age brings wisdom and an AARP card application in the mail every few months. With 11 grade school years under my belt, here are my top 5 back to school tips for your  child with special needs:

  Top 5 Back to School Tips_

1. Get the haircut early, at least a week before the start of school.  Having a child with special needs often means a lot of sensory issues and angst over haircuts.  For Nick the stress of getting one can affect him for several days after.  See Blog #18, “A Cut Above” in the archives for more haircut tips.

2. Arrange a time to take your child to the classroom before school starts.  Video or take pictures of the classroom set up (desk area, sensory area, restrooms, etc..) along with the lockers, lunch room, gym and of the teachers & aids.  I create a social story using these, much like a blueprint of what his day will be like. If a child with autism can see it in picture form, they will understand it. It will also help to keep the anxiety level down.

3. Have your child help lay out the clothes, organize the school supplies and pick out lunch/snack choices the night before.  They will feel more invested, and it makes for a smoother start to the day.

4. Arrange the mode of communication with the teacher ahead of time at the meet and greet. I found that e-mail is the best way to go. In addition, I use a communication notebook that goes back and forth to school.  I can jot down how Nick’s evening went and how he slept.   In addition, the teacher and I created a custom report in a visual form.  Nick is able to point to the icons and share what he did each day with me after school.

5. Consider doing volunteer work at your child’s school.  It’s fun and you can see firsthand how your child is doing and interacting with peers. Here are some volunteer activities I’ve done:

*Room mom helping with parties

*Chaperoning on field trips

*Art awareness presenter each month

*Working book fairs

*Making copies, laminating,  and putting together learning tools for the Case Manager/Support Teachers.

Getting organized, planning ahead, becoming involved in the classroom and communicating with the staff will help make this year a success for your child with special needs. Good luck with the new school year! That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa