Posted in Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #223~When It’s More Than Just Down Syndrome

Blog #223~When It’s More Than Just Down Syndrome

Parents of a child with Down syndrome will post questions online, about the possibility of their child also having autism.  Their questions are, what are the signs and symptoms, and also what is the benefit of having a secondary diagnosis of autism with the primary diagnosis of Down syndrome (DS-ASD)?  Having navigated the path of a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD for 24 years and working as a dual diagnosis specialist and consultant, I can attest to the benefits of getting the secondary diagnosis of autism along with Down syndrome.

Do you suspect that your child, student or client with Down syndrome may also have autism?  Learn about this:

*The signs and symptoms of DS-ASD

*The benefits getting an evaluation and secondary diagnosis of autism related with Down syndrome

*What additional services are available to support a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD

*Resources and support related to having a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD

Click here to learn find out: @https://nickspecialneeds.com/2016/09/12/blog-155more-than-just-down-syndrome/

Getting the secondary diagnosis of autism along with Down syndrome was the key to unlocking the door for more specialized training, communication and behavior support, funding and respite care for my son, Nick.  It also lead me to find support groups that are dealing with tough issues that are unique to children and adults with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.

magic key       down syndrome and autism intersect

Please feel free to share this blog post and any others that I’ve written.  My goal is to enlighten, educate and provide support for parents, families, professionals on navigating the path for children and adults, with special needs.  Message me if I can be of help, and be sure to check out our social media sites below.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

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Instagram @nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

Posted in Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #217~DS-ASD: Why the Autism Label Matters?

Blog #217~ DS-ASD: Why the Autism Label Matters?

Over the years I’ve read countless stories of parents struggling to get an autism evaluation and diagnosis for their child who has Down syndrome.  IEP (Individual Education Plan) teams often tell parents that, there is no need to get an autism label, because they already have a primary diagnosis of Down syndrome that they can work with.  A doctor may dismiss the idea because the child makes good eye contact, and is highly social.  This is my story as well with my son, Nick who is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD.  So, why does the autism label matter?

The book “When Down Syndrome and Autism Intersect, A Guide to DS-ASD Parents and Professionals” by Margaret Froehlke, and Robin Zaborek, states that:

“It’s only in  the past 10 to 20 years that we’ve learned that up to 18 percent of persons with Down syndrome will also have autism or ASD (autism spectrum disorder).  This is information that most healthcare professionals are not aware of and underscores the importance of this reference guide.”

Down syndrome and autism intersect2

Getting the secondary diagnosis of autism for an individual with Down syndrome will open up new doors for services to address the unique needs associated with DS-ASD.  For a parent, it validates what they have suspected for quite some time, and allows them to move forward to get services and support for their child.  Honestly, I was sad at first to receive the news of an autism diagnosis.  But eventually, I realized that this label explained the speech deficits, complex sensory, stimming and violent behaviors that Nick was exhibiting.  I rolled up my sleeves and sought help from the school IEP team and support groups to figure out how to help my son.  The secondary formal diagnosis of autism, enabled us to access the services from the district’s Autism Consultant.  This was the key to opening up new doors that helped in the areas of behavior and communication.

Behavior and communication go hand in hand.  As a child matures and approaches puberty, the behaviors can escalate to meltdowns that endanger themselves, family and school staff and peer students.  It is essential to determine the function of these behaviors and get a positive behavior support plan in place.  Evaluating the mode of communication is the second piece of the puzzle that must be addressed.  If a child is frustrated due to lack of speech or being non-verbal, they will often act out through their behaviors.  Individuals with DS-ASD may act out because they are trying to make sense of their world.  That is why a positive behavior support plan and mode of communication can enable a child to make their needs known, so they can get these wishes met.

autism-scrabble-letters-by-Jesper-Sehested

A BCBA Autism Consultant typically observes the child and takes data on behaviors by doing a Functional Behavior Analysis (FBA).  This detective work will uncover what is causing the behavior and lead to developing a behavior plan to support the child.

Frustrated icon   Detective-clipart-animation-free-images-2

Once the target behaviors have been identified, the Autism Consultant and IEP team members, along with the parents, can collaborate to find strategies to support the child.

For example if a child hits or pinches himself (Self-injurious behavior known as SIBS), or hurting others.  The Autism Consultant would determine possible causes and the setting in which it took place, and what the function of the behavior could be (avoidance, escape, boredom, etc..).  Possible antecedents might include:

*Diverted staff attention

*Unstructured/wait time

*Loud or crowded environment

*A change in activity to a non-preferred activity.

*Disrupted routine

*An object or activity is taken away

Supports can be put into place so that the child better understands what is expected.  A visual schedule, social stories, and communication mode (Picture Exchange Communication System knowns as PECS, or a higher tech, talker device) can be determined and put into place to allow the child to express their feelings, wants and needs.  The use of sensory diets and breaks, using noise cancelling headphones help the individual cope in stressful, crowded and loud environments, or regulation when the child is over or understimulated.

Providing behavior and communication support and strategies interventions for individuals with a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD will make a positive impact both at school and in the home setting.  In addition, the secondary diagnosis of autism opens up doors to more services and funding from state for respite care and behavior support at home. Having outside help with respite care, relieves the burden of stress on the family, and enables parents to continue to enjoy personal interests and taking a break outside the home.

Getting a proper and formal assessment and evaluation for a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism is a game changer.  Individuals with DS-ASD experience the world differently than just having Down syndrome or autism alone.  Intervention and support strategies can be targeted to the individual to specifically address behavior, communication and sensory needs for the child.  Finally, the second label of autism, will open up doors to support groups and additional funding for waivers that provide in home support and respite care for weary families like mine.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick on Social Media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC), Autism, Down syndrome, Speech and Occupational Therapy

Blog #69~Down Syndrome, Autism and Speech

Blog #69~Down Syndrome, Autism and Speech

I am often asked about Nick’s ability to produce words given the fact that he has Down syndrome and autism.  He does have a vocabulary including a few expletives that he picked up from us somewhere along the way. I find it interesting how he can say those words pitch perfectly.  This week I have a very special guest blogger.  Brian Sabella is Nick’s speech therapist and shares his perspective on working with Nick at Suburban Pediatric Therapies:  

Speech-Language Therapy and Nick

By Brian Sabella, CCC-SLP

I have been providing clinic-based speech-language therapy for Nick for over four years now. I feel fortunate for the experience for a couple reasons. First and foremost, he absolutely cracks me up—every week. There’s something about his brand of adolescent, slapstick humor that just resonates with me as a fellow male. Additionally, Nick’s family and support system are a pleasure to work with. They hold very high expectations of his communication abilities and understand communication takes other forms besides the spoken word. Nick uses a multifaceted system that includes spoken words, printed pictures, and electronic devices to communicate throughout his day. And as a speech therapist, I love it. For Nick, progress in “speech” means being able to communicate more effectively; it isn’t just about talking!

For those curious about the speech Nick does work on, here is a sample of some words we have practiced and continue to practice: help, Sprite, plate, shower, taco, pasta. With many of these words, Nick is not expected to articulate them exactly as you or I would, but rather, to produce them in a way that a listener would be more likely to understand. The idea is that Nick will probably be handing his conversational partner a picture of a taco anyway, so the spoken word is meant to enhance the communicative exchange. With this specific word, Nick will often produce aco, omitting the t. During our drill practice, I will call attention to my mouth and ask Nick to say it like I do, annunciating that missing t  sound and providing a visual cue (such as pointing near the area of my mouth where the sound is produced). After a correct production is established, Nick is encouraged to say it again a total of five times. Performing a high number of repetitions is always the best way to learn a new movement pattern, whether that movement is a golf swing, a pencil stroke, or a spoken word. Admittedly, speech drill is not one of Nick’s favorite things to do, so his good efforts are always rewarded with a bit of praise or even a small morsel of food.  You know, just to stay on his good side.

Most of my time spent with Nick in therapy hasn’t actually been focused on improving his speech. Some of it has. But I’m actually more concerned with improving Nick’s ability to communicate through other means. The reason for this is because, like many other individuals on the autism spectrum, Nick shows a strong preference for pictures.  He also presents with apraxia of speech, which further complicates matters. This is why at home and at school, Nick’s uses a picture exchange system that helps him communicate during everyday activities.

Teresa carries around with her a set of pictures of Nick’s favorite fast food restaurants.  When they are out running errands and it’s time for lunch, she shows Nick the pictures and he points to the logo of the restaurant he’s in the mood for. If he requests Taco Bell (which he usually does) he can then flip to a page that shows pictures of their menu items and he can indicate which ones he wants to order. Much of our time in speech therapy has been spent working on expanding his comprehension and use of these pictures.

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Then there’s the Bored Board. As readers of this blog, you know that when Nick is bored, he finds ways of wreaking havoc in extremely creative ways. Picking up on these signs of boredom before Nick decides to dump fajita seasoning on the cat or spill an entire bottle of cooking oil on the floor will allow his parents to redirect these behaviors to something less destructive. The Board Bored shows Nick pictures of more appropriate objects and activities to request: DVDs, computer games, an iPod, a whoopee cushion, Flarp noise putty, a (fake) bloody Halloween hand, a sound effects toy that makes burping and glass-breaking sounds, etc.  Nick and I have spent hours working on requesting with the Bored Board so that he can more effectively use it in a time of need.

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Recently, our sessions have been focusing on having Nick formulate requests using “I want.”  We set up a board using an alternative-augmentative communication (AAC) iPad app called Proloquo2Go. It transforms the iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch into a high-tech voice output device that helps a person communicate by typing or touching pictures. Nick’s screen displays a variety of preferred snacks and some phrases, including “I want.” Our goal was to have Nick indicate which snack he wanted by pressing “I want” then the snack item.  When he does this, the device speaks the sentence “I want popcorn;” I then reward him with some popcorn.  If Nick only touches the snack item without “I want” first, then I prompt him to press both.

Proloquo2Go

As you might imagine, producing these sentences was initially difficult for Nick.  But over time, he became very good at producing them.  This graph tracks his progress and shows that Nick went from almost always needing support to produce these “I want” requests to, after five sessions, almost always producing them independently.

Graph

As you can see, speech therapy is not always about speech.  For Nick, speech therapy is about helping him communicate effectively, even if it means doing so with pictures or electronic devices. With an alternative system of communication in place, Nick’s life is a little easier.  And his pets are a little safer, too.

Brian Sabella and Nick working at Suburban Pediatric Therapies 🙂 ……

Brian and Nick

Special thanks to Brian Sabella, CCC-SLP for sharing his insights this week.  For more about Suburban Pediatric Therapies check out their website at http://www.sptherapies.com.  As you can see there is much more to communication then just speaking words.  That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick on Social Media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram @nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall