Posted in Autism, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #238~Autism: Welcome to My Life… Sleep Number is Zero

Blog #238~Autism: Welcome to My Life… Sleep Number is Zero

Autism Acceptance and Awareness Month is winding down, but for countless families living with autism it will continue beyond April, and often includes a sleep number of zero. That is the opening chapter of the book, Welcome to My Life: A Personal Parenting Journey Through Autism by author Laurie Hellman. My son Nick, is 27 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD). I am quite familiar with sleepless nights followed by the fog and exhaustion that comes with autism. But this book is much more than sleepless nights. The author takes you through a journey that is a honest portrayal of what autism is like, often raw but always filled with compassion and love.

Available on Amazon at
https://amzn.to/2Df6qbL

What I find refreshing about the book, Welcome to My Life, is that it depicts many of the aspects that families deal with when autism is profound. Author Laurie Hellman, pulls back the curtain and lets you in to see the dents in the walls, the internal, detailed pre-planning before any event outside the home and yes…..the literal shit show, because trust me it happens. I found myself nodding my head, getting teary eyed and laughing, as her stories were so relatable. Laurie’s love and determination for her son mirrors mine. Finally, there are many lessons that Laurie offers in her book:

“Skyler teaches me to be brave, strong and courageous. he’s taught me that when I am tired and feel like giving up, I can keep going.” Laurie Hellman

It was heart wrenching to read about the additional health struggles associated with Laurie’s son, Skyler. I admire how she poured over research and turned over every stone to find answers and treatment to help him. As a mother of a child with autism, I understood the feelings of grief over what might have been. In my book A New Course: A Mother’s Journey Navigating Down Syndrome and Autism-(https://amzn.to/2W3Un6X) I wrote about all the milestones that my son missed out on, like getting his driver’s license, going to the prom and eventually heading off to college. Did you know parent’s of individuals with autism sometimes find it easier to smile and say everything is fine? Why? Because quite frankly on some days it’s just too much to unpack. When autistic kids can’t process overstimulation it can lead to meltdowns, and as a parent you are right in the path of any collateral damage. Laurie writes about how her son can’t verbally communicate so he may lash out by swatting her arm or smacking her leg…..

“On most days, I think to myself, Does he even like me?” Laurie Hellman

After 27 years of navigating DS-ASD with my son, I have learned the function of such behaviors. I cope, by putting them in the compartment of brain rewired differently with autism. I don’t take it personally, when Nick hits me anymore, because he is mostly non-verbal. I recognize that these behaviors are his means to communicate when he feels overwhelmed and not being heard.

I think that what you will learn from reading books about autism like ours, is that if you met one person with autism…. you met one person with autism. Each is a unique journey, because autism is a spectrum disorder. Autism Acceptance and Awareness Month is about understanding these journeys and different perspectives. With better understanding our society can be more kind, patient and compassionate:

“Simple acts of kindness go such a long way and can restore my sometimes-crumbling faith in humanity.” Laurie Hellman

Moving beyond Autism Acceptance and Awareness Month, I encourage you to continue to learn more about autism. Share our stories so we can make this a bigger narrative. That sleep number of zero is real, along with the challenges associated, especially when autism is profound. Understanding leads to acceptance. It means showing kindness by making some room at the table for all abilities and behaviors of autistic individuals along with their families.

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow us on social media:

Laurie Hellman’s blog, podcast links at http://www.lauriehellmann.com

Our Facebook and Instagram at Down Syndrome with a Slice of Autism and Twitter @tjunnerstall

Posted in Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Education and Special Needs, IEP (Indivdualized Education Plan), Parenting Special Needs, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #236~Need IEP Help? The New Go-To Guide: Special Education Savvy

Blog #236~Need IEP Help? The New Go-To Guide: Special Education Savvy

IEP Season is here, do you need help understanding the process and how to become a better advocate for your child? I’ve got the resource for you, just in time for IEP season. It is the new go-to guide, Special Education Savvy: A Mom’s Guide to Mindset and Effective Advocacy Throughout the IEP Journey and it’s a must read! I received an advanced reader copy of Mary Beth Gilliland, M.ED book which was just released last week. The author literally takes you the reader, by the hand and guides you step by step on the IEP process.

IEP stands for Individual Education Plan, which is a written document outlining the program of special education instruction, supports and services that a student with a disability needs to make progress in school. IEP’s can be complicated and daunting, especially for moms who are new to navigating this journey with their child. I was one of those moms, my son Nick, has co-occurring Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD). This new book, Special Education Savvy is the book that I wish I had in my hands 27 years ago.

Special Education Savvy stands out in my mind as different than other special education/ IEP/advocacy books for several reasons. First of all, the author Mary Beth Gilliland feels like a mentor that is sitting right there with you at an IEP meeting. She provides sections that include basic special education 101, advocacy strategies, IEP meeting tips and more. You will also learn how to handle the uncomfortable and often challenging encounters that parents may face when IEP’s, when aren’t being followed or their child is not making progress. Second, this book is easy to read especially for busy moms who are juggling a multitude of responsibilities. The technical jargon associated with special education is clearly spelled out making it easier to understand. Mary Beth also breaks down every aspect of the IEP process, so you don’t feel overwhelmed. Finally, as the title suggests you come out of each chapter feeling confident with a savvy mindset ready to advocate for your child.

I found myself shaking my head, yes as I read each chapter. Mary Beth uses clever analogies to make important points about a student’s rights along the technical stuff like IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) and FAPE (Free and appropriate public education). Again, she clearly explains these tough areas and makes the information parent friendly.

As a DS-ASD consultant, advocate and author of A New Course: A Mother’s Journey Navigating Down Syndrome and Autism (available at https://amzn.to/2W3Un6X ) I highly recommend Special Education Savvy. It is the ultimate instruction manual for understanding and advocating for your child’s IEP. You will feel more educated and empowered with this well written toolbox of strategies. Ultimately, this knowledge will help to ensure your child receives the services and support to be successful in school.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. Now, I am off to find a cute pair of yellow flats and get savvy for April to advocate about Autism Awareness Month.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow us on social media on Facebook and Instagram @ Down Syndrome with a Slice of Autism and on Twitter @tjunnerstall.

Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

World Down Syndrome Day 3/21/21

World Down Syndrome Day 3/21/21

World Down Syndrome Day is this Sunday, 3/21/21. “WDSD purpose is to raise awareness around the world of what Down syndrome is and the vital role people with Down syndrome play in our society. The day has been officially observed by the United Nations since 2012 and the date — always on the 21st day of the 3rd month — is meant to highlight the uniqueness of the triplication (trisomy) of the 21st chromosome, which is the cause of Down syndrome.”

World Down Syndrome Day is an opportunity for all of us to promote awareness, understanding, acceptance and inclusion.  Lack of knowledge and understanding can prevent people with Down syndrome from being accepted and included in society.  The message is simple, every individual is unique, we all have value, and everyone has the right to live a happy and fulfilling life.  I heard a great quote the other day, “Down syndrome is just another way that humanity presents itself”.  

My son Nick is 27 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism. He has taught me a multitude of life lessons. Our story has touched the lives of so many others:

Here are 3 easy ways to celebrate WDSD and promote acceptance and inclusion:

*Promote Down syndrome awareness on social media using the hashtags #wdsd #worlddownsyndromeday #downsyndromeawarness #t21 #downsyndromelove #downsyndrome #321 #abilities #inclusion #funkysocks #downsyndromerocks #downsyndromewithasliceofautsim 🙂 Don’t forget to rock those funky socks to show that different is beautiful and wonderful!

*Encourage the use of person first language.  This means saying, “a person or individual with Down syndrome”.

Do NOT say:
* “A Down syndrome baby, child or kid.”
* “Down’s baby, child or kid”
* “Down’s”
* “He or she has Downs

*Click here to: Take action – World Down Syndrome Day

Promoting WDSD on social media, encouraging the use of person first language and getting involved with WDSD events and fundraisers are wonderful ways you can be a part of of celebrating the uniqueness of individuals with Down syndrome. That’s what is in my noggin this week. Be sure and follow us on social media: Facebook and Instagram at Down Syndrome With a Slice of Autism to see how we will be celebrating!

~Teresa 🙂

Posted in Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #235~More than Down syndrome, Co-occurring DS-ASD

Blog #235~More than Down syndrome, Co-occurring DS-ASD

As a DS-ASD consultant and author of A New Course: A Mother’s Journey Navigating Down Syndrome and Autism, I am often asked why it is important to seek a secondary evaluation for autism for individuals with Down syndrome. My son, Nick is 26 years old and has co-occurring Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD). The needs associated with DS-ASD are complex and there are several areas where you can support a child at their level.

Order your copy at https://amzn.to/2W3Un6X

Click on the blog link below to read more about co-occurring DS-ASD and how you and the IEP team can better support the additional needs associated with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism:

Blog #155~More Than Down Syndrome,DS-ASD – Down Syndrome with a Slice of Autism (nickspecialneeds.com)

There are many more services, supports and resources available for individuals with co-occurring Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD). My mission is to help families navigate this journey easier, raise awareness, understanding and provide guidance in this journey navigating DS-ASD.

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow on Social Media

Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest at Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #233~Down Syndrome Awareness Month

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month. My son, Nick is 26 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD). As a parent, writer and advocate, I strive to educate others to better understand more about Down syndrome and autism. Down syndrome awareness is about promoting understanding, acceptance and inclusion of all individuals with Down syndrome.

FACTS about Down syndrome from National Down Syndrome Society (NDSS):

*Down syndrome occurs when an individual has a full or partial extra copy of chromosome 21. This additional genetic material alters the course of development and causes the characteristics associated with Down syndrome.

*There are three types of Down syndrome: trisomy 21 (nondisjunction) accounts for 95 percent of cases, translocation accounts for about 4 percent and mosaicism accounts for about 1 percent.

*Down syndrome is the most commonly occurring chromosomal condition. One in every 691 babies in the United States is born with Down syndrome.

*There are more than 400,000 people living with Down syndrome in the United States.

*Down syndrome occurs in people of all races and economic levels.

*The incidence of births of children with Down syndrome increases with the age of the mother. But due to higher fertility rates in younger women, 80 percent of children with Down syndrome are born to women younger than 35.

*People with Down syndrome have an increased risk for certain medical conditions such as congenital heart defects, respiratory and hearing problems, Alzheimer’s disease, childhood leukemia and thyroid conditions. Many of these conditions are now treatable, so most people with Down syndrome lead healthy lives.

*A few of the common physical traits of Down syndrome are low muscle tone, small stature, an upward slant to the eyes and a single deep crease across the center of the palm. Every person with Down syndrome is a unique individual and may possess these characteristics to different degrees or not at all.

*Life expectancy for people with Down syndrome has increased dramatically in recent decades — from 25 years old in 1983 to 60 years old today.

*People with Down syndrome attend school, work and participate in decisions that affect them, and contribute to society in many wonderful ways.

*All people with Down syndrome experience cognitive delays, but the effect is usually mild to moderate and is not indicative of the many strengths and talents that each individual possesses.

*Quality educational programs, a stimulating home environment, good health care and positive support from family, friends and the community enable people with Down syndrome to develop their full potential and lead fulfilling lives.

More information @ http://www.ndss.org/Down-Syndrome/What-Is-Down-Syndrome/

Here are a few simple ways to promote Down syndrome awareness:

*Post information and stories about individuals with Down syndrome on your social media platforms.

*If you are a parent of a child with Down syndrome, send updates, pictures and tell your story to your family doctor and OB/GYN. Consider becoming a Hope Advocate- where you will get a custom hope kit to distribute to your OB/GYN and family doctor. More information @ https://hopestory.org/sign-up/

*Many local Down syndrome support groups have promotional materials, like books and bookmarks that can be distributed at libraries and schools.

*Down syndrome support groups have public speakers available to talk with schools, businesses, community groups, hospitals, and other organizations.

*Support or volunteer for local fundraisers like the Buddy Walk in your community @ https://www.ndss.org/play/national-buddy-walk-program/ . This month The Down Syndrome-Autism Connection is doing a 3-2-1 Caring and Sharing fundraiser to directly help families navigating a dual diagnosis. I will be posting more about this on social media. Find out more about this awesome support group @ http://www.ds-asd-connection.org/

*Encourage your kids to volunteer for Special Olympics and Best Buddies programs through their school.

*Always use and promote “people first language” to respectively speak about a person with a disability. Individuals with Down syndrome should always be referred to as people first.  Instead of “a Down syndrome child,” it should be “a child with Down syndrome.” Also avoid “Down’s child” and describing the condition as “Down’s,” as in, “He has Down’s.”

down-syndrome-awareness-month

My book A New Course: A Mother’s Journey Navigating Down Syndrome and Autism is helping so many readers understand both Down syndrome and a co-occurring Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD). It’s available on Amazon, plus there are share buttons you can utilize for social media to help spread awareness. Order and share @ https://amzn.to/2W3Un6X You can also order my book on other platforms and read chapter one for FREE @ http://www.teresaunnerstall.com. I appreciate the 70+ awesome five star Amazon reviews. Your support and sharing A New Course on your social media sites is spreading great awareness and understanding. I will be doing some more giveaways this month for everyone who shares my book on social media!

Thank you for supporting Down syndrome awareness this month! That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow us on Social Media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram @nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Education and Special Needs, Parenting Special Needs

Blog #230~Book Review: Scoot Over and Make Some Room

Blog #230~ Book Review: Scoot Over and Make Some Room 

My recent summer read– Scoot Over and Make Some Room: Creating a Space Where Everyone Belongs, by author and Instagram star, Heather Avis is a must read. She is the mother of 3 adopted children, two with Down’s syndrome and one of color.  Here is one review from her book that speaks volumes:

“In a world of divisions and margins, those who act, look, and grow a little differently are all too often shoved aside. Scoot Over and Make Some Room is part inspiring narrative and part encouraging challenge for us all to listen and learn from those we’re prone to ignore.”

Each chapter in the book Scoot Over and Make Some Room extends the challenge to make room for not only individuals with Down syndrome but way beyond to all individuals with different abilities, ethnicities, race, viewpoints and perspectives. Heather’s book is filled with humorous stories, challenges and lessons she has learned raising her 3 children, navigating IEP’s, inclusion and acceptance. But this book dives down much further, by challenging the reader to look into their own lives and broaden your understanding and compassion towards people who may be different from you.

My son Nick is 26 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD). In my book A New Course: A Mother’s Journey Navigating Down Syndrome and Autism @ https://amzn.to/2W3Un6X  there are many stories about times where I would brace myself in public. Countless times I would apologize for my son’s seemingly inappropriate behavior, and yes like Heather have a moment where the pants have gone down, 🙂

Heather tells about the “pants down in the park” episode that was highly inappropriate (and a one-time occurrence) with her daughter Macyn. I can attest to the need to be on high alert and cringing at times. Macyn is a very spirited and outgoing girl who likes to engage with strangers by waving and sometimes asking “WHATCHA NAME?” This happened once at a hip LA restaurant. This raises a good question: Is this behavior inappropriate or just different than the social norm? Why are we so fearful to interact with individuals who have an intellectual or developmental disability? Often it is fear of the unknown and being uncomfortable around someone who may speak or act differently.

Heather writes this powerful message in her book:

“We fear the unknown. And unfortunately, until we create space for people with physical and intellectual disabilities to show up exactly as they are and give them permission to interrupt our social norms, they will continue to be unknown and we will continue to be fearful,”–Heather Avis

What a profound message this is to society and lesson about acceptance. Personally, I feel that the world could use more kind interactions like saying “hi” and “WHATCHA NAME.”  Obviously, we can all agree that “pants down in the park” is an inappropriate behavior. But as Heather writes in part:

“all of us have a responsibility to shift the way we react when faced with uncomfortable social situations. All of need to scoot over and make some room for people to respond in a way we’re not use to.”–Heather Avis

One of my favorite parts of this book is the chapter entitled “Make room for the Wildflowers.” Much of what we do in life is like a garden– planted in nice, neat rows. Take for instance inside school classrooms where the desks are all lined and in sync. Is there any space for the wildflowers to grow in these tidy rows? This metaphor opens up the dialog about inclusion and different abilities working alongside in the same classroom. Can we scoot over and make some room to let the wildflowers grow amongst the seamless rows and see the value of inclusion and all abilities?  I can speak from experience that my son, Nick brought great value and taught lessons of patience, compassion and unconditional love to his peers while in the inclusion classroom setting. He continues to do so as a young adult with his interactions out in the community and at his adult developmental day training program.

There is so much more to this book and you will have to read it to find out for yourself. Scoot Over and Make Some Room is a call to action to shout the worth of people who are left out and misunderstood. Every parent, extended family member, physician, educator, pastor and others will gain a deeper understanding of how to do a better job to adjust, sit and listen in order to learn how to find a way to make room for everyone to be valued, accepted and included in our society.

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

 ~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook-Instagram-Pinterest @Down Syndrome with A Slice of Autism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heather Avis writes from the heart about all the things she wishes the every day person knew about inclusion. This book applies to teachers, parents, siblings and simply everyone who wants to change the way we see inclusion in the world around us.

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Parenting Special Needs

Blog #229~The Mighty Article: Navigating the Covid-19 Lockdown With My Son Who Has Down Syndrome and Autism

Blog #229~The Mighty Article: Navigating the Covid-19 Lockdown With My Son Who Has Down Syndrome and Autism

Here is an article that I wrote for The Mighty that was published last week about navigating the Covid-19 lockdown with my son Nick who is 26 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD):

https://themighty.com/2020/05/supporting-person-down-syndrome-autism-covid-19/?utm_source=engagement_bar&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=story_page.engagement_bar/

Nick and Al Walking Covid-19

A silver lining in the Covid-19 lockdown, Nick and his Dad are taking long walks together when the weather prevails. I think a lot of families are doing this, how about yours? 🙂

Last Tuesday, my book A New Course: A Mother’s Journey Navigating Down Syndrome and Autism launched and is available on Amazon https://amzn.to/2W3Un6X

A New Course Book Cover multiple books

It was a full day of virtual activities with some fun surprises. I will share more about the launch events on next week’s blog. A New Course is now ranked #25 in the ENTIRE Disability Parenting category and #2 in Hot New Releases in that category. 🙂  Let’s keep the momentum going. You can do so by leaving an Amazon review–That is the BEST way to help get this book out into the world.

Amazon Reviews

 

My mission is to help families, medical professionals, educators, DS support groups and every individual to truly understand this journey with my son– and to make things easier for everyone who is trying to help individuals navigate a dual diagnosis!

Thank you for all your support both in A New Course and this blog that has helped so many people learn more about DS-ASD.

That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa 🙂

Click on my website below for Social Media, book and blog information:

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Posted in Autism, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Parenting Special Needs, Resources for Special Needs

Exclusive Author Interview- A New Course: A Mother’s Journey Navigating Down Syndrome and Autism

Exclusive Author Interview- A New Course: A Mother’s Journey Navigating Down Syndrome and Autism

A New Course Book Cover multiple books

My book A New Course: A Mother’s Journey Navigating Down Syndrome and Autism”  will launch next week on May 5, 2020! Pre-order your copy now on Amazon—  https://amzn.to/2W3Un6X My mission as an author and dual diagnosis consultant– is to make this journey smoother for families navigating a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD).

This week, an exclusive interview I did with Leslie Lindsay, the award-winning author of SPEAKING OF APRAXIA (Woodbine House, 2012). Leslie has been awarded as one of the top 1% reviewers on GoodReads and recognized by Jane Friedman as one of the most influential book reviewers. Since 2013, Leslie has interviewed over 700 bestselling and debut authors on her author interview series. Follow her bookstagram posts @leslielindsay1. More about Leslie following interview below.

Check out this exclusive interview and get the behind the scenes scoop about my book, A New Course: A Mother’s Journey Navigating Down Syndrome and Autism:

https://leslielindsay.com/2020/04/27/wife-mother-and-advocate-teresa-unnerstall-dives-in-head-first-with-her-all-hands-on-deck-approach-to-navigating-an-autism-downs-syndrome-diagnosis-in-her-new-book-a-new-course/

Leslie Lindsay Book Picture

Artistic photo of book cover designed and photographed by Leslie Lindsay. Join her on Instagram @leslielindsay1 #alwayswithabook for more like this.

Thank you to Leslie Lindsay for a great interview and all your support! 🙂 Next week, I’ll post the virtual book launch activities here on the blog and social media sites listed below. Join A New Course Book Launch page on Facebook to get the latests updates in real time!

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow on Social Media:

Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest @Down Syndrome with a Slice of Autism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 


 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Parenting Special Needs, Self-care for special needs parents

Blog #228~DS-ASD: Parenting During the COVID-19 Crisis

Blog #228~DS-ASD: Parenting During the COVID-19 Crisis

How’s everyone doing at home during this COVID-19 Crisis? The new normal of staying at home has it’s challenges, especially when you have a child with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD). My son Nick is 26 years old and usually attends a daily adult developmental day training program. The structure and routine provides meaning to his life. But the Coronavirus has taken that away from him and all of us. So now what? I wish that I could wave a magic wand and show you how to navigate through this quarantine with your kids. I can only offer my perspective on parenting a child with DS-ASD this week. I’ll keep it short, because I suspect we are all overwhelmed.

Last week’s blog provided daily independent living skills ideas to work on at home with your child. Nick did great helping out and I posted daily videos of him in action on our social media sites. We will continue these living skills and also do some activity bins: Home School Activity Ideas: https://nickspecialneeds.com/tag/puzzle-and-mathcing-ideas-for-home/

I think it’s important to cut ourselves some slack right now. This is uncharted territory for all of us. 

Here are 5 things I am keeping in my noggin this week, to help navigate thru the COVID-19 Crisis:

*1-Remember to respond and not react when your child gets frustrated, bored and overwelmed. One of the lessons I offer in my book A New Course: A Mother’s Journey Navigating Down Syndrome and Autism (click here to order https://amzn.to/2W3Un6X ) is the following: “Remain calm and matter of fact. You must be a constant in a sea of uncertainty”

*2-Do what you can and don’t beat yourself up. This isn’t the time to put pressure on yourself to play all the roles of a teacher, OT, PT, speech and behavior therapist. Take this opportunity to have fun with your kids and naturally build in learning and interaction around activities that they enjoy. We’ve been turning off Fox News and CNN and instead, snuggling under a blanket and watching old movies that Nick and his older brother Hank enjoyed growing up.

*3-Get some exercise! As a 35 year fitness professional I promise it will boost your immune system and elevate your mood. Go Noodle learning stations has some fun, free movement videos you can do with your kids: https://www.gonoodle.com

*4-I keep reminding myself that we are all in this together and that gives me comfort. It also helps me to tap into a memory that I’ve personally suffered through a lot worse. In August of 1983, Hurricane Alicia left us paralyzed and without electricity for 2 long, HOT weeks down in Houston, Texas. Oh, and thank goodness for humor and all the funny memes being shared on social media 🙂 

*5-What am I doing today to make things better for myself and others? 🙂

daily quarantine questions

So, these are the 5 things I am keeping in mind to navigate what appears to be a marathon of social isolation during the Coronavirus crisis. I wish each of you wellness and peace in your homes with your family and plenty of toilet paper for all. We can do this, we’re all in this together!

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa 

Follow on Social Media:

Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest at Down Syndrome With a Slice of Autism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

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Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Education and Special Needs, Parenting Special Needs

Blog #227~Daily living skills you can work on at home with your kids during the COVID-19 Crisis

Blog #227~Daily living skills you can work on at home with your kids during the COVID-19 Crisis

So, your stuck at home with your kids during this COVID-19 crisis, now what? This is actually the perfect time to work on daily living skills with your kids. Why are these skills important to know?

Let’s go back to the purpose of the Individual Education Plan (IEP):   To promote further education, employment and independent living skills.

Often, in our busy lives it’s easier to skip over teaching daily living skills on a consistent basis with our kids. So now that time has slowed down, why not take a few of these skills and hone in on them? Not only will this help your child become more independent, it will also promote confidence, family teamwork and as a bonus– many skills provide sensory input. My son Nick is 26 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism (DS-ASD). Over the years we have built in many daily living skills into his routine at home.

Here are a few of the jobs that Nick does around the house and how they provide sensory input:

*Recycling (replacement behavior for throwing)
*Can crushing (sensory and motor activity and replacement behavior for throwing)
*Carry laundry basket and load washing machine (heavy work/ organizing)
*Put away groceries (organizing activity)
*Empty Dishwasher (organizing and sensory activity)
*Cleaning/ wiping down countertops and windows (organizing activity)
*Vacuuming (heavy work which is calming)

 

The following link below is a full list of daily living skills in the areas of self-care, personal hygiene, kitchen skills, home management skills, to name a few. Focus on one or two skills at a time. You can access visuals and task strips off of Google Images and videos on YouTube:

https://learningforapurpose.com/2019/09/01/the-best-functional-life-skill-resources-for-individuals-with-autism

This is a time of uncertainty and anxiety levels are running high for all of us. First of all breathe, our kids take cues from how we are reacting during this crisis. Next, cabin fever is a real thing, so try to enjoy each other and find ways to work together at home. This will benefit the whole family. Give you kids a sense of purpose and foster new skills to bolster their confidence. This will help them grow to become more independent. Be well and don’t forget to keep those iPads charged 🙂

My book A New Course: A Mother’s Journey Navigating Down Syndrome and Autism is packed with more strategies and story about navigating a dual diagnosis of DS-ASD @https://amzn.to/2W3Un6X

TU_5-5x8-5_WPS_ebook

One last thing– World Down Syndrome Day is this Saturday 3/21– Here are 3 easy ways that you can help promote awareness, acceptance and inclusion: https://nickspecialneeds.com/2018/03/19/blog-200world-down-syndrome-day/

That’s what is in my noggin this week,

Teresa 🙂

LOGO TRANSPARENCY (5)

Follow Nick to see even more daily living skill activities and videos:

Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest @Down Syndrome with a Slice of Autism

Twitter @tjunnerstall