Posted in Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Speech and Occupational Therapy

Re-Blog~One of My Favorites

Re-Post~ One of My Favorite Blogs

No school today, it’s “Building Articulation Day” (whatever that is).  I was going to try and write but Nick is on a mission to drive me bonkers this morning.  So I decided to re-post one of my favorite blogs.  You will get a real sense of Nick’s world living with Down syndrome and autism.

Here’s a hint 🙂 ………. Splat!

photo (20)

That wasn’t part of the recipe, Nick…….. Poor Woody

 

photo (40)

Now that I have your curiosity, see what else Nick has done and what we do about it @https://nickspecialneeds.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/blog-3-getting-your-goat/

Hope you enjoyed Nick’s world, the rest of us are just trying to keep up. That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa

Posted in Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Fun Side of Nick

Blog #86~Down syndrome and Autism…Boy to Man

Blog #86~ Down syndrome and Autism… Boy to Man

I find it mind blowing that my son turned 20 years old.  What a strange dichotomy.  In many ways he is much like a child.  Nick still watches Thomas the Tank Engine DVD’s and plays with kiddy toys.  He needs prompts with grooming, dressing and navigating throughout the day.

nick and stuart little

He is small in stature, and at first glance you might mistake him for a middle school aged student.  But if you take a closer look, there are signs that he is indeed a young man.  His voice is deep and you can see the visible razor stubble on his chin.  That, and the fact that he likes to sneak a gulp of his Dad’s beer on occasion.  🙂

Bottoms up Nick……

nick drinking beer

At Nick’s conference last week, a poignant question was raised.  What are his barriers for increased independence?  For Nick it is his impulsiveness.  It’s that need to push buttons, in particular those big red buttons. He can never be left alone.

For those of you keeping score at home, the current count is 30 pulls since 3rd grade…….

firelite-pull-station

In the Down syndrome and autism support groups we all scratch our heads at the antics that our kids come up with.  The reoccurring theme is that impulsiveness.  It’s uncanny, the things they come up with to mess with us.  So often, our stories are similar.  Maybe it’s throwing a shoe out the bus window, coming in like a seagull and swiping something off your plate, opening up the car door while you are driving 50 miles an hour, stripping down buck naked, throwing an iPhone down the toilet, turning the TV volume up to 99, blowing a snot rocket and wiping on the flat screen  or pushing the microwave and phone intercom button repeatedly.

Or dumping an armful of hangers into the washing machine…

hangers in washing machine

Hardy har har Nick, good one!  There are a lot more pictures in Blog #3~Getting Your Goat, located in the April 2012 archives.

Within the framework of the “barrier question” above, it becomes increasingly obvious that these behaviors need to be controlled and contained.  Best case scenario, maybe Nick needs to express his funny side in a more appropriate fashion that is less invasive.  There is no way he could survive in a group home pulling such pranks.

We have two more years in the post-secondary transition program.  On the day of his 22nd birthday the little yellow bus will stop coming to the door.  So, the IEP goals for Nick need to be focused on global independence both in the community and at home.  It’s a bit daunting but then again, so was toilet training him. Somehow we survived that.  I look forward to the IEP next week and seeing how his program can be shaped to foster a more mature adult version of Nick.  That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa

Posted in Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome, Education and Special Needs

Blog #3~DS-ASD, Getting Your Goat

Blog #3~DS-ASD, Getting Your Goat

  • Eggs
  • Celery
  • Balsamic vinegar
  • Olive Oil
  • Parsley
  • Fajita seasoning
  • Merlot
  • Penne pasta noodles
  • Laundry detergent
  • Acne wash
  • Fluoride rinse
  • Shaving cream
  • Whey protein powder
  • Shower gel
  • Hand lotion
  • Baby powder

That’s the short list and I don’t mean grocery list.  It is just some of the stuff that Nick has gotten his hands on and dumped out on the kitchen floor. I wish I could say that I am rewinding to back when Nick was age six.  But this is the here and now; the flavor of the week (or in this case for the last year or so.) Nick is 18 years old with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  This makes for an interesting mix of behaviors.

I have consulted teachers, therapists and behavior specialists in autism.  After they have a good laugh at the list, the conclusion is the same. First, it could be a sensory issue.  Nick seeks out many odd things to look through, tap and stim on and perhaps the act of dribbling out a tube of Mederma skin lotion from the second floor banister is satisfying some sensory need.   The second theory is that Nick is seeking attention and looking for a reaction. All I know that it is very hard to keep your cool when you see a full 64 ounce, Costco size container of olive oil emptied all over the floor. Fortunately I get my paper towels at Costco too. 🙂 I will say that the floor and my knees have a nice sheen to them.  Then there is our  poor cat, Miss Mellie sleeping innocently while Nick sprinkles a half bottle of fajita seasoning all over her gray fur.  Okay, I had to run into the other room and laugh on that one.

Freshly seasoned and washed cat…..

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The dumping is just one facet.  Nick is like a toddler putting all kinds of things in the toilet.  A package of pens, my reader glasses, his iPod nano and his Dad’s watch are just a few of the things he’s submersed.  The newest trick is putting your shoes in the sink and running the water faucet full blast.  Here’s the thing.  He commits the crime, runs downstairs pointing up with a grin on his face and says “Uh oh.”  He is always looking to get a response.  It is not easy to keep a poker face during these episodes.  However I look at it like this, Nick is just trying to *”get my goat”.  The goat is a metaphor for a state of calm and peacefulness.  I grit my teeth, make absolutely no eye contact. On a shelf near the kitchen now stands a stack of permanently borrowed, white gym towels.   I point to the pile and he grabs a towel and cleans up.  No reinforcement is given to him.

Better put Mederma on the list…….

Not all the things he does are this messy.  Sometimes they are just plain funny, like a baby doll in the Pierogis….

So how can these inappropriate, attention seeking behaviors be managed?  First, the incidences are documented on what is called a Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA). On the form I record the date and time of the incident. Then follow the ABC’s:

Antecedent= What happened before the behavior

Behavior= The actual behavior and incident that occurred

Consequences= What happened after the incident

After looking at ABC ‘s, one can see if there is a common thread and determine why they might be doing the behavior.  As I mentioned in my very first blog entry, every behavior (even the bad ones) are trying to communicate something.  In some cases, it’s a sensory seeking reason.  Think about it- the sound of an object breaking or sight of a mess spilling or shattering all over the floor is exciting.  In the case of dumping, often it is when a parent is busy around the house, on the phone or trying to get ready to go to work.  It is clear that Nick is bored and seeking our attention while we are busy.  But mostly, I think it is a “control thing” for him.  It is something that HE has power over in his own life.

With this information a positive Behavior Support Plan (BSP) can be developed targeting undesirable behaviors.  Look at what possible replacement behaviors could be put in place instead.  This is where the “choice board” comes in.  This board has appropriate choices in the form of icons which he can pick from to better occupy his time. These choices should be highly preferred and stored away, so they are not accessible.  Below is a sample choice board.  The drop box is filled with fun things to throw and dump, followed by the woopie cushion, DVD player and iPod touch:

The final piece will be to add an icon to indicate that the behavior he did was wrong.  If he can see it in visual form, he will understand it.  This is to be done again without eye contact so as not to reinforce the attention he is craving.

Icon to show for inappropriate behaviors:

angry face

In the meantime, as I put the final touches on this piece, I turn around to see Nick unloading the dishwasher by himself.  This is a something he has complete control over (and is really adept at doing by himself).  I smother him with praise, “Good job big guy, I am so proud of you”.  Catch your child being good and reward them with the positive reinforcement.

Way to go Nick! 🙂

Show the icon for appropriate behavior:

happy face

All of these visual supports need to be done consistently across the board in every venue (home, school and community.) Hopefully with this plan in action, we can cut down on the dumping.  At this point in our lives we shouldn’t be dealing with this type of behavior or having to reinstall safety locks back on all the cabinet doors.  What can I say- It’s Nick’s world, the rest of us are just trying to keep up.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

Here’s to not letting anyone get your goat*!

~Teresa 🙂

*The expression ‘to get your goat’ has its origins in horse racing. Race horses are very high-strung animals. Goats are often used as companion animals, to keep a horse calm. Someone wanting to fix a race would slip into the barn the night before the race, steal the goat, and then an upset, distracted horse would run a bad race. Hence, if you are upset and not at your best, it is said that ‘someone has gotten your goat.’

Nick age 5 with our next door neighbor goats in Northern California.

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