Posted in Autism, Behavior/ ABA, Down syndrome

Blog #112~Regression of Behaviors

 

Blog #112 Regression of Behaviors

Christmas 2014 was anything but merry.  The swimsuits, flip flops, suntan lotion and pool toys sat in a pile on the chasse in my bedroom.  We never made it to the Florida Keys for our vacation.  A member of our extended family came down with pneumonia and then a snowball effect of more health problems that included a 12 day stay in the hospital.  Nick wasn’t sure what to make of things.  He is 20 years old and has Down syndrome and autism.  All he saw was his Dad or me taking off all day on hospital visits which were an hour away.  Nick picked up on the fact that something was very wrong.  He was sad and angry and missed being with the extended family.  We spent that two week break unsure of the outcome and shooting from the hip.  In 20 years of raising Nick, I have NEVER seen such a spike in regressive behaviors.

When daily routines are interrupted a child with autism can feel anxious and behaviors regress.  Strict routines, normalized school or work schedules without any unexpected occurrences enable a child with autism to progress best.  However, because the holidays are busy, stressful and filled with the hustle and bustle of foods, gifts, and family; a parent can expect to see behavioral changes.

Back to Nick and those behaviors that spiked, which included the following:

*Increased stimming with objects and louder vocal stimming

*Pushing microwave fan, phone intercom and now house alarm system much more

*Throwing objects and dumping things like a one man wrecking crew.

*Spitting and rubbing snot on flat screen TV, windows, on our clothing.

*Squirting liquid soap in his eyes, rubbing lotion all over himself

nick lotion

*Multiple, violent meltdowns

*Peeing his pants several times

And to top it off, I left a bottle of Febreeze out by accident………Oh nooooooo!

febreeze

FYI, Febreeze and a flat screen TV don’t mix well.  So, we had to purchase a new one……..

IMG_4203

By the way if you Google search “Febreeze on a flat screen TV” there are several entries of other kids doing this.  Nice to know we’re not alone. 🙂

I reported all of this in the school/home communication book.  The school staff wrote back that Nick was definitely not himself. He was trying to pull fire alarms, pinching his cheeks hard as well as a staff member.  To make matters worse, just as Nick was back in his school routine we had two snow days.  On top of that, the kids were off two more for the end of semester and MLK Day.  Oh, and there was a full moon over the holiday break.

autism and full moon

The house is quiet now, and I can focus on writing again. Yesterday, I did a little research on regression of behaviors and holiday breaks.  As I reflect on Christmas 2014, a couple of things stand out.  First of all, Nick’s behavior was magnified because his parents emotional fatigue and lack of emotional availability.  For over two weeks we were back and forth at the hospital.  Nick picked up on the stress.  Secondly, as a family we should have communicated in private about medical updates.  I think back on one particular day.  As I briefed Al on the hospital visit, Nick came over crying and wanted a hug. I had to remind myself that he understands much more of what we are talking about.  He also picks up on the negative vibes of conversations. Finally, one tip I read in my research was so obvious.  But when you are in the thick of things it can be overlooked.  That is, don’t let your kids be aimless.  It’s essential to find ways for them to occupy your child.  When kids are on a school break, they have less structure in their day. Bottom line, they’re going to get into more trouble and conflict because they have the opportunity to do so.

While there was no kayaking, bike rides, beach and pool time or key lime pie over Christmas we did make it through.  Things are slowly on the mend. The cousin’s presents and white elephant gifts are tucked away for now.  The Hormel Cure 81 Ham sits in the refrigerator awaiting a belated Christmas celebration at a later date. The gift of Christmas 2014 is being reminded of how precious life is and how quickly it can be taken away.  In addition, I have a new perspective of how important it is to respect Nick’s needs when there is a school holiday break. That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Fun Side of Nick, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs

Blog #107~Dolphins and My Son with Special Needs

 

Blog #107~Dolphins and My Son with Special Needs

There is something about dolphins and Nick. The first time I noticed his fascination was on a field trip to the Shedd Aquarium when he was 6 years old. As the dolphins sprung out of the water he got so excited! The look on his face was sheer delight. I’d never seen him so joyful and mesmerized all at once.

Dolphin show

A few years later, at SeaWorld in San Antonio, my sister witness Nick’s joy.  Laura literally cried seeing Nick’s face light up.  He is so drawn to the dolphins and beluga whales.  Nick has Down syndrome and autism.  His speech is limited.  But no words were needed.  The look on his face said it all.  I knew that I had to find a way for him to get up close with dolphins as they seemed to be able to connect to Nick.

A few years ago we took a vacation down in the Florida Keys.  This was a perfect opportunity to find a program where Nick could get in the water with the dolphins.  There are many dolphin encounters in that area but I decided on a more personal experience at Hawk’s Cay Resort“The Dolphin Connection” provided this with small groups of 4 or 5 participants. I spoke with the head trainer to discuss our son and his special needs. She assured me they were very experienced with handling such. I created a social story filled with icons to support Nick in understanding the schedule of events. It was a beautiful day with the warm sun cascading over the aqua waters of the Keys.

Hawks-Cay-004-340x213

The first part consisted of a brief classroom instruction to go over rules and education on dolphins. Nick along with his Dad, brother and cousins were so excited to squeeze into wet suits and get down to the docks.  The experience was very hands-on where each participant individually got to touch, feed, hug and even kiss these amazing mammals.  Nick was completely engrossed. As the trainer had the dolphin roll over Nick quickly bent down to give the dolphin a “raspberry” on its belly.  The trainer remarked, “Well, THAT’S a first”.  Leave it to Nick,  I have a feeling that trainer will never forget him!

raspberry

The final portion of the dolphin encounter included interaction using hand signals. This was a huge splash as they were able to gesture and the dolphin would clap, twirl around, move backwards, and jump high in the air.  As I stood behind the camera filming, I was deeply moved.  This day was such a beautiful gift and the photo tells the story that Nick indeed was connected and absorbed in this moment.

Nick and his Dad……

Nick Kiss

Nick still likes to watch the video footage from that day. Two of his favorite movies are Flipper and A Dolphin Tale. I have to think that this unique experience will forever be one of the best things we have done for our son and together as a family.

Nick’s brother, Hank and  his cousin Anna….

dolphin photos 07 002 (2)

When you have a child with special needs and limited speech it can be extremely challenging to know what they are thinking, feeling and what they truly love.  I had a hunch that this experience would be a slam dunk.  Indeed, it was and then some.  My heart is warm in knowing that we could give this to him.   That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa