Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #222~Dear Doctor,A Down Syndrome Diagnosis is a Hope Story

Blog #222~Dear Doctor, A Down Syndrome Diagnosis, is a Hope Story

What is the right way for a doctor to deliver the news that your baby has Down syndrome either pre-natal or at birth?  Over the weekend, I received a link from Nothing Down, called Dear Doctor http://www.nothingdown.org/ The short film link, interviewed parents who shared their experiences with their doctor.  The delivery of the news of a Down syndrome diagnosis was often cold, stoic, and grim.  In some cases, the doctors told the parents what their child couldn’t do, while others were offered the option to terminate the pregnancy.  So how should a doctor deliver the news to parents that their baby has Down syndrome? Educating medical professionals, communities, and advocating for inclusion and acceptance, are some of the goals during the month of October, which is Down Syndrome Awareness Month.  The more you understand Down syndrome, the less fear you will have about the navigating the challenges associated with the diagnosis.

DS-Awareness-Month

I’m excited to share a new program that is going to change the way many medical professionals will deliver a pre-natal or birth diagnosis of Down syndrome.  It’s called Hope Story!

Hope Story’s Mission:

“Hope Story exists to give support, encouragement and hope to parents whose child have received a Down syndrome diagnosis; to provide free resources to the medical community to help them deliver a Down syndrome diagnosis, and to find ways for parents of children born with Down syndrome to use their unique story to bring hope to others.”  

Hope Story Helps 3 Main Groups:

*Parents whose child received  a diagnosis of Down syndrome.

*Parents who have a child with a diagnosis of Down syndrome.

*Medical Professionals

Hope Story will be providing kits to advocates who will partner with medical professionals.  Hope Advocates will inform, educate and allow doctors to get to know someone with Down syndrome on a personal level.  Tools in the Hope kit contain valuable information on how to deliver a diagnosis of Down syndrome, and a preferred language guide to help talk about Down syndrome with dignity, respect and hope.  In addition, the Hope booklet addresses concerns a new parent may have about Down syndrome.  Other tools include welcome letters, announcements, business card and  training videos for Hope advocates.

For more information on Hope Story click here:   @https://hopestory.org/about/

I’m looking forward to being an advocate for Hope Story, and the opportunity to work with medical professionals on delivering a positive pre-natal or birth diagnosis of Down syndrome.  Giving hope to other families who have a child with Down syndrome, has been the fuel for my writing for many years.   One thing I wish someone would have told me 24 years ago, when my son, Nick was born is this:

DD are like comas

Babies and children with Down syndrome have to work harder with physical, occupational and speech therapy to hit developmental milestones, and yes it may take longer, but they will and it hit them, and it will be grand!

My son Nick, age 24 🙂

Nick Key West

As we close to the end of October and Down Syndrome Awareness Month, I feel optimistic about the future of  individuals with Down syndrome.  We are moving beyond awareness, to acceptance and inclusion in society.  The future looks much brighter, with more opportunities for individuals with Down syndrome.  I’ve highlighted many success stories all month in my blogs, and social media listed below.  Education and understanding about Down syndrome is the key, and Hope Story is taking charge to help medical professionals and parents.  When you have knowledge and hope, the fear subsides.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick and view more about Hope Story and the Dear Doctor film on social media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Feeding, Physical Therapy and Special Needs, Speech and Occupational Therapy

Blog #197~My son with Down syndrome, 24 years ago: What I learned

Blog #197~My son with Down syndrome 24 years ago: What I learned

Down syndrome journey

Birthdays are often a time to reflect back on our journey in life.  My son Nick, will be turning 24 years old next week.  I didn’t know until after he was born, that he had Down syndrome.  Honestly, I was more concerned for his health more than anything.  After a week in ICU, Nick was released.  The doctor told us to go home and love are baby.  He cautioned me that Nick might not be able to nurse properly and gain weight without having to use a feeding tube.  I thought to myself, “game on, challenge accepted”.  I rolled up my sleeves and got to work.  I hated all those wires that had been hooked up to him in ICU.  I certainly didn’t want any more hooked up to my son, moving forward.

The feeding tube never entered the equation.  Instead, what I found is that we had to work harder to be successful not only in feeding, but in reaching all developmental milestones.  Within 8 weeks, Nick started an Early Childhood Intervention (ECI) program.  Low muscle tone is a trait of having Down syndrome.  The physical, speech and occupational therapists along with his teacher provided strategies to help build strength and endurance.  More important, they gave us pragmatic ways to incorporate these at home in our daily routine.

Nick propped in high chair, supported with a bolster under his legs and pillows on the sides…..

Nick low tone high chair

That is how it all started 24 years ago, with Nick.  I’ve learned a few things while raising my son especially in the early years.  First, is that the developmental milestones take longer to hit, but each mark was met with hard work and persistence.  In addition, find the people and resources that will facilitate, motivate and help to modify your child’s environment to allow them to grow and flourish.  It’s important to keep your expectations high, just as you would with any other child.  But keep in mind, you have to be very patient, because it can take longer to roll over, crawl, walk and feed.  If you feel like your child is stalled in development, then look for other therapies and strategies to push them forward.  This was the case when Nick was a year old and unable to sit up on his own.  His core was so weak due to low muscle tone.  I made the decision to try equine (horseback) therapy which helped him immensely.  This brings me to one more lesson I learned.  Look at finding the RIGHT therapies and services, instead of just adding in more.  Each child is individual and motivated in different ways.

Nick doing horseback therapy in 1995…..

Nick horseback therapy

Consider a variety of strategies, such as infant massage, sensory integration, motor play with proper positioning, and oral motor exercises that can accelerate growth.  Keep in mind what interests your child has, and use those tools to build into play and daily routines at home.  Nick was very motivated by music and enjoyed oral motor activities like blowing and popping bubbles.  His physical therapist would have him sit on a small ball while blowing, tracking and popping bubbles.  Nursery rhymes and signing were also incorporated while sitting on the ball, which acted as a dynamic surface to build core strength.  Siblings can be great with play to stimulate movement and arousal for your baby.

Nick with his brother Hank……

Nick and Hank babies

The challenges associated with low muscle tone and Down syndrome can be met with hard work, persistence, and finding the right support and therapies that will facilitate building muscle strength and endurance for your child.  Early intervention will help to build a solid foundation which allows your child to become their best self.  Nick’s come a long way since the days where he was propped up with bolsters and pillows.  He is a strong, funny, helpful, mischievous and happy young man. Next week, we will be on vacation in Vail to ring in #24.  No blog next Monday, but you can catch Nick on social media. Happy Birthday to you Big Guy!

Nick in Key West, over the Christmas holidays 🙂 ….

Nick Key West

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick on Social Media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Fun Side of Nick

Re-Blog~ 5 Reasons I am Thankful for Nick

thankful

This week, a re-blog of #75 that I wrote last November:  5 Reasons I Am Thankful For Nick (who is 20 years old and has Down syndrome and autism). Click right here @https://nickspecialneeds.wordpress.com/2013/11/25/blog-755-reaso…nkful-for-nick/

Thank you for reading and sharing Nick’s world.  Wishing you all a blessed Thanksgiving. 🙂

~Teresa

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Fun Side of Nick

Blog #75~ 5 Reasons I am Thankful for Nick

Blog #75~ 5 Reasons I am Thankful for Nick
thankful
The road I have travelled with Nick was not in the plan.  It’s the thin, grey line on the map that is bumpy and full of twists and turns.  Nick has Down syndrome and autism.  The pace was bogged down as he struggled to hit developmental milestones. Other times it has been lightning fast, (like when you are racing to beat him to an exposed fire alarm). After 19 years and 30 fire alarm pulls, I am very thankful for Nick and here is why:

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1. I appreciate the small successes much more now. I don’t take anything for granted that a child has to learn like sitting, eating, crawling, walking, talking and especially toilet training. Each victory has been sweeter when Nick hit the marks.

2. I am more grounded because of Nick. He has taught our family to stay humble. While other moms were bragging about their child getting A’s in honors classes, being the star athlete and what colleges they were looking at, I smiled politely.  In my mind I was thinking, “At least Nick didn’t pee in his pants at school this week.”

3. I’ve become some what of an expert on Down syndrome and autism. Through trial and error along with wonderful teachers, therapists and mentors I have learned what works best for Nick. I am now able to pay it forward in my writing, speaking engagements and helping other parents out.

4. Life is never boring with Nick. He cracks me up with his mischievous ways.  He generates  laughter and tons of  “Likes” on my Facebook page: Down syndrome With A Slice Of Autism”.

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Here’s Nick’s signature elbow bump, (his version of a high five) with his Dad and Aunt Laura  🙂

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He’s got that look on his face like, I’m going to grab your wine)  🙂

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What a jokester, hardy har har Nick……

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5. Nick gives unconditional love so freely. Each morning he wakes up, lets out a fart and smiles. All through the day he showers me with kisses, elbow bumps and hugs.

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I am truly thankful to have travelled down this road with Nick.  It has been a blessing to be his mom.  That’s what is in my noggin this week. Have a wonderful Thanksgiving!
~Teresa

snoopy thanksgiving