Posted in Autism, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Autism Awareness Month,5 Ways You Can Help

Autism Awareness Month, 5 Ways You Can Help

autism awareness 2016

April is Autism Awareness Month, but it’s much more than promoting awareness.  Individuals with autism, their caregivers, and advocates want to encourage better understanding, inclusion and acceptance of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Here are 5 easy ways you can help promote awareness, understanding, inclusion and acceptance for individuals with autism:

https://nickspecialneeds.com/tag/autism-5-ways-you-can-help/

Each of us can do our part to help individuals with autism feel more welcomed in their communities. Much can be gained in our society, when we begin to accept people for who they are, and understand and embrace their differences.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow my son Nick (dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism,DS-ASD):

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

Posted in Autism, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Behavior/ ABA, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #205~Post Mother’s Day Advice

Blog #205~Post Mother’s Day Advice

Being a mom can often result in feelings of guilt, and second-guessing decisions that you make for your children.  As a mother of a son with special needs, this is even more heightened.  Now, you see it on social media.  There are so many individuals with special needs, succeeding in new therapies, Special Olympics, and going to prom.  This creates added pressure to do even more for your child.  After 24 years of raising my son Nick, who has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism, I have gone through all these feelings of not doing enough.  This week, I ask that you STOP and take a breath Moms!

unplug it quote

After you stop and take that breather, you can re-boot and move forward, and re-evaluate what your child needs at this point in their lives.

*Are the current therapies and interventions effective?

*What other programs are available, that might be a better fit?

*What type of activities can be incorporated at home?

In the following blog, I outline how to re-evaluate current activities along with implementing effective TEACCH method ( Treatment and Education of Autistic and Communication which is an evidence-based service, training, and research program for individuals of all ages and skill levels with autism spectrum disorders).  The TEACCH method is a structured program that helps individuals with ASD to learn, function and reach their goals.  Incorporating TEACCH activities at home can be a time saver, instead of running around multiple times a week for ABA (Applied Behavioral Analysis) therapy.

Click here to view:  https://nickspecialneeds.com/2017/08/07/blog-180special-needs-momslet-go-of-the-guilt/

Nick doing TEACCH Method at home 🙂 (video version available on our social media sites listed below)…………..

nick folding washcloths

For more information about Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) TEACCH Method click here: https://www.appliedbehavioranalysisprograms.com/faq/what-is-the-teacch-method/

My advice post Mother’s Day, is to take a deep breath and re-evaluate current programs for your child.  Decide which are effective and relevant, at this time in their lives.  Are these therapies and interventions the most efficient use of time for your family?  Prioritize and determined what you can scale back on.  Consider implementing the TEACCH activities at home to save time.  These activities help to build new skill sets, confidence and independent living.  Finding the balance for your child with special needs along with your family is key.  It will also help you as the mom to feel less guilty, and more confident as a parent.

That’s what is in my noggin this week 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick on Social Media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Autism Safety and Wandering, Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #168~ New Disability Identification Card

Blog #168~ New Disability Identification Card

This morning, I attended an event presented by Illinois State Representative, Stephanie Kifowit at the Aurora Police Department.   Last year, she sponsored legislation to create a disability awareness card.  Many individuals in our community live with special needs.  Often, their conditions can sometimes make it difficult to communicate in stressful situations.  This new disability wallet card was unveiled to foster better communication for individuals who struggle during these times.

State Representative Stephanie Kifowit….

FullSizeRender

This initiative was the idea of School Board President Lori Price, who is a parent of a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Persons with autism spectrum disorder and other disabilities may shut down, get nervous, panic or display inappropriate behaviors during high stress situations.  The disability awareness card is a tool, to help individuals quickly identify themselves to first responders and other public figures.   An individual can quickly show this wallet card, which will help to prevent a situation from escalating.

Face it, we all get nervous when being pulled over by a police officer.  Imagine what it must feel like for a person medically diagnosed with an intellectual, developmental or mental disability. This wallet card is different from the state ID card, as it contains the following…..

On this card, these conditions may present a person who:

*Appears deaf or unable to understand

*Has difficulty speaking or communicating

*Engages in repetitive or self-stimulating behaviors such as rocking or hand flapping.  

*Becomes agitated due to physical contact or stressful situations

*Acts indifferent or unresponsive

These conditions are stated on the card along with this statement:

“Please do not interpret my behavior as refusal to cooperate.  To better communicate with me, it can be helpful to speak slowly and clearly, repeat questions and allow time for responses.”

“If those techniques are unsuccessful, I request that you contact the person noted below on my behalf as he/she will confirm my diagnosis and provide information you may need about my identity or condition.”

These cards are free to individuals who have been approved by the Secretary of State’s office for an Illinois Person with a Disability ID card.  

For an application click here @https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com

I applaud State Representative Stephanie Kifowit for taking Lori Price’s idea for this simple card, that will improve communication and help de-escalate high stress situations.  This will assist law enforcement and first responders in keeping our loved ones safe.  Readers , please let me know if an identification card like this has been implemented, where you live.  If not, perhaps it’s time to champion this effort!

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Who’s getting funky on World Down Syndrome Day, 3/21?

Deadline for ordering your funky socks for World Down Syndrome Day is this Thursday.  Support our campaign to help The National Association for Down Syndrome and our local homeless shelter by ordering and rocking your socks on, 3/21!  Click here to order: https://my.wehelptwo.com/campaign?reset=1&id=373

Follow Nick:

Down Syndrome With A Slice of Autism on Facebook and Pinterest

#dsautism on Instagram

@tjunnerstall on Twitter

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome

Blog #108~ Seinfeld Thinks He Has Autism

Blog #108~ Seinfeld Thinks He Has Autism

So Jerry Seinfeld thinks he might be on the autism spectrum. This story aired last week:

In his sit-down with Brian Williams, Seinfeld said, “I think in a very drawn-out scale, I think I’m on the spectrum.” The comedian added, “You’re never paying attention to the right things. Basic social engagement is really a struggle. I’m very literal. When people talk to me and they use expressions, sometimes I don’t know what they’re saying,” Seinfeld said. “I don’t see it as dysfunctional, I just think of it as an alternate mindset.”

Jerry Seinfeld

Since this interview aired there has been an outpouring of criticism from the autism community.  Many parents who are in the trenches battling autism are up in arms, and with good reason.  They are dealing with their child having debilitating seizures, sleep deprivation, health issues and violent meltdowns. They face the reality that their child will never talk, drive, date, get a job, live on their own or get married. It diminishes what families go through and they find it insulting to their children’s diagnosis.  Countless families are fighting to get services and funding for to take care of their child.  Amongst all this, they are cleaning up poop smear accidents.

poop icon

Here is a statement from Wendy Fournier, President of the National Autism Association:

What frightens me with these kinds of statements and stories is that I don’t want people to think that autism isn’t a serious diagnosis, or that it’s not a struggle for individuals and their families. What many people don’t understand is that on that lower-functioning end of the spectrum, we have individuals who are suffering and whose lives are at risk.” “Autism is not a designer diagnosis,” Fournier added.

Let me throw in my two cents here. My son, Nick is 20 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  His speech is very limited; he will never drive a car, date or get married and live on his own.  He requires supervision 24/7.  Oh and yes, I’ve cleaned up my fair share of $h*t storm accidents.

The only thing that Nick and Jerry Seinfeld have in common is that they are both incredibly funny guys.

All Aboard Diner 4-23-10 006

I am a huge Seinfeld fan, and I’m not going to boycott his shows because he made these comments without a formal diagnosis. He has the right to how he feels and share his journey of self-discovery.  But, I disagree with Seinfeld saying, “I don’t see it as dysfunctional, I just think of it as an alternate mindset.” He is suggesting that it’s just a different way of thinking, rather than a disorder.  Well, autism is a disorder!

I fear that society and government policymakers will disregard the seriousness of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).  The media is so quick to shine a light on the positive stories of autism, especially when a celebrity is involved.  That’s great, I’m all for any media attention to raise awareness. I hope Jerry continues to use his celebrity status to help advocate for more funding and services towards autism.  But society needs to see the other side of the spectrum and what families deal with on the front lines of the combat zone.  Maybe next week, I’ll write about one of those bloody battles I’ve had with Nick.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa