Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

World Down Syndrome Day: 3/21

World Down Syndrome Day: 3/21

On March 21st, World Down Syndrome Day (WDSD), we celebrate and raise awareness around the world of what Down syndrome is and the vital role people with Down syndrome play in our society.

World Down-Syndrome-Day

Trisomy 21, also known as Down syndrome occurs when there are 3 copies of chromosome 21. That is why WDSD is held on March 21st each year.  This day highlights the importance of promoting awareness, understanding, inclusion and acceptance for individuals with Down syndrome.

Read 3 easy ways you can help to promote WDSD:

https://nickspecialneeds.com/2018/03/19/blog-200world-down-syndrome-day/ 

Let’s celebrate the uniqueness of individuals with Down syndrome on 3/21 and everyday!  Don’t forget to rock your funky socks on Thursday. 🙂

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow my son Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #200~World Down Syndrome Day

Blog #200~World Down Syndrome Day

“World Down Syndrome Day is Wednesday, March 21, 2018 and its purpose is to raise awareness around the world of what Down syndrome is and the vital role people with Down syndrome play in our society. The day has been officially observed by the United Nations since 2012 and the date — always on the 21st day of the 3rd month — is meant to highlight the uniqueness of the triplication (trisomy) of the 21st chromosome, which is the cause of Down syndrome.”

World Down-Syndrome-Day

World Down Syndrome Day is an opportunity for all of us to promote awareness, understanding and inclusion.  Lack of knowledge and understanding can prevent people with Down syndrome from being accepted and included in society.  The message is simple, every individual is unique, we all have value, and everyone has the right to live a happy and fulfilling life.  I heard a great quote the other day, “Down syndrome is just another way that humanity presents itself”.  

DSAwarenessMagnet

So, how can we promote awareness, understanding, inclusion and acceptance? 

Three Easy Ways To Promote World Down Syndrome Day:

1. Promote Down syndrome awareness on social media.  Rock your funky socks and T-shirts.  Let’s see them on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.  Share inspiring, beautiful pictures, stories and videos of individuals with Down syndrome.  Tell us how an individual with Down syndrome has affected your life. Use hashtags, here are a few suggestions-  #wdsd #downsyndrome #321 #abilities #inclusion #funkysocks #downsyndromerocks #PROVETHEMWRONG

Nick Prove Them Wrong

My son Nick (pictured above) is 24 years old, and has Down syndrome and autism.  We’ve joined Noah’s Dad-Down syndrome awareness in their campaign #PROVETHEMWRONG.  More information at http://noahsdad.com/

2. Educate others about Down syndrome and encourage the use of person first language.  This means saying, “a person or individual with Down syndrome”.

Do NOT say:
* “A Down syndrome baby, child or kid.”
* “Down’s baby, child or kid”
* “Down’s”
* “He or she has Downs”

3. Encourage inclusion in your community.  What opportunities are available for meaningful jobs, volunteer work and other contributions for individuals with Down syndrome?  Are there any fundraisers like the Buddy Walk, funky sock campaign or other local DS support group activities, that you could get involved in?  Adults teens and children can volunteer to help with programs like the Special Olympics, Best Buddies peer program, and GiGi’s Playhouse.

Nick volunteering at GiGi’s Playhouse…..

nick-cleaning-gigis

Here’s an amazing business:  Bitty & Beau’s Coffee is more than just a place to grab a cup of coffee – it’s an experience. While the shop is run by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and the customers love the products, they really come in for the unique customer service experience……..

bitty and beau coffee shop

Promoting awareness on social media, educating others about Down syndrome to use person first language, and finding inclusion opportunities are three great ways you can  support World Down Syndrome Day 3/21/18!  Help others to gain a better understanding, acceptance and inclusion for individuals with Down syndrome.  Let’s look past the diagnosis and see the uniqueness of each individual and their vital role to our society.  I can’t wait to see your posts on social media and rocking those funky socks for WDSD 2018!

We Help Two funky socks available at http://www.wehelptwo.com/ ………

That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick on Social Media:

 Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism 

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Down Syndrome Awareness, Spread the Word!

Down Syndrome Awareness, Spread the Word!

March is a significant month for raising awareness and acceptance for individuals with Down syndrome and other intellectual and developmental disabilities.  It is time that we as a society, do something to change the way people refer to individuals with special needs.  There are several campaigns and events this month, that I want to highlight!

spread the word 2018

“Spread the Word to End the Word is an ongoing effort to raise the consciousness of society about the dehumanizing and hurtful effects of the word “retard(ed)” and encourage people to pledge to stop using the R-word. The campaign is intended to get schools, communities and organizations to rally and pledge their support to help create communities of inclusion and acceptance for all people. Most people don’t think of this word as hate speech, but that’s exactly what it feels like to millions of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, their families and friends. What started as a youth-led grassroots effort in 2009 by a small group of students with one simple call to action, has evolved to communities across the world not only taking the pledge, but challenging others to talk, think and write with respect.”

Click here and pledge to Spread the Word to End the Word:

https://www.r-word.org/r-word-take-action.aspx#.Wp1zqExFx2s

spread the word tee shirt

 

Be sure and mark your calendar for March 21st, World Down Syndrome Day!

World Down-Syndrome-Day

“World Down Syndrome Day creates a single global voice for advocating for the rights, inclusion and well-being of people with Down syndrome.  The mission is to promote awareness and understanding, seek international support, and to achieve dignity, equal rights and a better life for people with Down syndrome everywhere. The date for WDSD being the 21st day of the 3rd month, was selected to signify the uniqueness of the triplication (trisomy) of the 21st chromosome which causes Down syndrome.

Click here for more information about WDSD:

https://worlddownsyndromeday.org/about-wdsd

One of the trademarks of World Down Syndrome Day is rocking your fun, brightly colored, funky socks.  Last year I partnered with We Help Two for a fundraiser and awareness campaign.  Portions of the proceeds went to our local Down syndrome support group, the National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS) http://www.nads.org.  In addition, for every pair of socks sold, We Help Two gives a pair of thermal socks to donate to a local homeless shelter.

funky-socks

Last year, my son Nick and I raised over $500 for NADS and donated 59 pair of thermal socks to The Hessed House, a local homeless shelter.  The campaign was super easy to set up and promote on social media, with minimal time as the host.

Nick and I donating We Help Two thermal socks to the Hessed House……….

Nick and Mom at Hessed House 2

To order or host your own Rock your Funky Socks for WDSD click here:

http://www.wehelptwo.com/

Order socks to directly benefit NADS fundraiser click here: https://my.wehelptwo.com/campaign?id=795

Check out the brand new styles offered this year, by We Help Two :)………

 

 

One more campaign I want to showcase is led by Noah’s Dad, called #Prove Them Wrong. 

“It’s awesome to see so many people with special needs proving to the world that what it may think about them is wrong! We see so many of your children are doing awesome things as well! We want to invite you to be a part of a fun new campaign we’re doing called the #PROVETHEMWRONG campaign and show the world how your children are doing that! I’m going to be making a video for World Down Syndrome Day and I want you / your family in it!” -Noah’s Dad

prove-them-wrong-tee-shirt-noahs-dad-down-syndrome

For more information about #PROVETHEMWRONG click here:

https://provethemwrongshirts.com/

http://noahsdad.com

Our dream as a community of advocates for those living with intellectual and developmental disabilities, is to live in a world where everyone feels respected, loved accepted and appreciated.  Let’s get out there and spread the word this month and make a difference for the future!

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick on Social Media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month

October is Down syndrome Awareness Month

DS-Awareness-Month

October is Down syndrome Awareness Month.  I’ve had the privilege of raising my son,  for the past 23 years.  Nick has Down syndrome and autism. He has touched my life, and those of so many others along the way.

nick-senior-alarm-pic

Down syndrome awareness is about promoting acceptance and inclusion of all individuals with Down syndrome.

FACTS about Down syndrome from National Down Syndrome Society (NDSS):

*Down syndrome occurs when an individual has a full or partial extra copy of chromosome 21. This additional genetic material alters the course of development and causes the characteristics associated with Down syndrome.

*There are three types of Down syndrome: trisomy 21 (nondisjunction) accounts for 95 percent of cases, translocation accounts for about 4 percent and mosaicism accounts for about 1 percent.

*Down syndrome is the most commonly occurring chromosomal condition. One in every 691 babies in the United States is born with Down syndrome.

*There are more than 400,000 people living with Down syndrome in the United States.

*Down syndrome occurs in people of all races and economic levels.

*The incidence of births of children with Down syndrome increases with the age of the mother. But due to higher fertility rates in younger women, 80 percent of children with Down syndrome are born to women younger than 35.

*People with Down syndrome have an increased risk for certain medical conditions such as congenital heart defects, respiratory and hearing problems, Alzheimer’s disease, childhood leukemia and thyroid conditions. Many of these conditions are now treatable, so most people with Down syndrome lead healthy lives.

*A few of the common physical traits of Down syndrome are low muscle tone, small stature, an upward slant to the eyes and a single deep crease across the center of the palm. Every person with Down syndrome is a unique individual and may possess these characteristics to different degrees or not at all.

*Life expectancy for people with Down syndrome has increased dramatically in recent decades — from 25 years old in 1983 to 60 years old today.

*People with Down syndrome attend school, work and participate in decisions that affect them, and contribute to society in many wonderful ways.

*All people with Down syndrome experience cognitive delays, but the effect is usually mild to moderate and is not indicative of the many strengths and talents that each individual possesses.

*Quality educational programs, a stimulating home environment, good health care and positive support from family, friends and the community enable people with Down syndrome to develop their full potential and lead fulfilling lives.

More information @http://www.ndss.org/Down-Syndrome/What-Is-Down-Syndrome/

NDSS_logo

Here are a few simple ways to promote Down syndrome awareness:

*Post something about Down syndrome on social media

*Send updates, pictures and tell your story to your family doctor and OB-gyn.

*Many local Down syndrome support groups have promotional materials, like books and bookmarks that can be distributed at libraries and schools.

*Many local DS support groups have public speakers who can talk to schools, businesses, community groups, hospitals, and other organizations.

*Support or volunteer for local fundraisers like the Buddy Walk in your community @http://www.ndss.org/buddy-walk/

*Encourage your kids to volunteer for Special Olympics and Best Buddies programs through their school.

Down syndrome journey

Thank you for supporting Down syndrome awareness this month!  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness

World Down Syndrome Day

world-down-syndrome-day

World Down Syndrome Day (WDSD), observed on 21 March every year, is a global awareness day which has been officially observed by the United Nations since 2012.  On this day, people with Down syndrome and those who live and work with them throughout the world organize and participate in activities and events to raise public awareness and create a single global voice for advocating for the rights, inclusion and well-being of people with Down syndrome. Many of these events are recorded on the official World Down Syndrome Day website.  The date for WDSD being the 21st day of the 3rd month, was selected to signify the uniqueness of the triplication (trisomy) of the 21st chromosome which causes Down syndrome.

DSAwarenessMagnet

WDSD 2017 Call to action is, #MyVoiceMyCommunity – Enabling people with Down syndrome to speak up, be heard and influence government policy and action, to be fully included in the community.  For more information visit: http://www.worlddownsyndromeday.org

My son Nick, is 23 years old and has Down syndrome and autism.  He participates fully in an adult day program, with enriching activities in the facility as well as the community, including volunteer jobs.

IMG01

We can all help to promote awareness on social media and spread a positive message for  people with Down syndrome.

Thank you to everyone who ordered funky socks from WeHelpTwo.  Our campaign helped to raise money for The National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS), http://www.nads.org, here in the Chicago area.  In addition, WeHelpTwo  is donating a pair of thermal socks for every pack we sold to our local homeless shelter.  The campaign ends at the end of this month.

warm-sock-photo

To order socks click here:  https://my.wehelptwo.com/campaign?=1&id=373

Nick and I can’t wait to see you all rock your funky socks, tomorrow.  Please post your pictures on our social media sites below!

Together, we can create a loud voice for better understanding, and advocating for rights, inclusion, and well-being for people having Down syndrome.  That’s what’s in my noggin this week.

wdsd2016

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism on Facebook and Pinterest

#nickdsautism on Instagram

#tjunnerstall on Twitter

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized

Blog #158~Down Syndrome Awareness Month

Blog #158~Down Syndrome Awareness Month

Down syndrome awareness month

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month.   This month, I want to share some information and educate the public about Down syndrome.

Facts about Down syndrome

Courtesy of The National Down Syndrome Society (NDSS)

*Down syndrome occurs when an individual has a full or partial extra copy of chromosome 21. This additional genetic material alters the course of development and causes the characteristics associated with Down syndrome.
*There are three types of Down syndrome: trisomy 21 (nondisjunction) accounts for 95% of cases, translocation accounts for about 4% and mosaicism accounts for about 1%.
*Down syndrome is the most commonly occurring chromosomal condition. One in every 691 babies in the United States is born with Down syndrome.
*There are more than 400,000 people living with Down syndrome in the United States.
*Down syndrome occurs in people of all races and economic levels.
*The incidence of births of children with Down syndrome increases with the age of the mother. But due to higher fertility rates in younger women, 80% of children with Down syndrome are born to women under 35 years of age.
*People with Down syndrome have an increased risk for certain medical conditions such as congenital heart defects, respiratory and hearing problems, Alzheimer’s disease, childhood leukemia, and thyroid conditions. Many of these conditions are now treatable, so most people with Down syndrome lead healthy lives.
*A few of the common physical traits of Down syndrome are low muscle tone, small stature, an upward slant to the eyes, and a single deep crease across the center of the palm. Every person with Down syndrome is a unique individual and may possess these characteristics to different degrees or not at all.
*Life expectancy for people with Down syndrome has increased dramatically in recent decades – from 25 in 1983 to 60 today.
*People with Down syndrome attend school, work and participate in decisions that affect them, and contribute to society in many wonderful ways.
*All people with Down syndrome experience cognitive delays, but the effect is usually mild to moderate and is not indicative of the many strengths and talents that each individual possesses.
*Quality educational programs, a stimulating home environment, good health care, and positive support from family, friends and the community enable people with Down syndrome to develop their full potential and lead fulfilling lives.

Down syndrome journey

Since this is about awareness, it is important to educate people on the appropriate language that should be used. People with Down syndrome should always be referred to as people first.

Do NOT say:

*”A Down syndrome baby or child.”

*”Down’s baby or child”

*”Down’s”

*”He has Downs”

Instead say: “A child with Down syndrome”.  Finally it should be said “Down” and NOT Down’s.” Down syndrome is named for the English physician John Langdon Down, who characterized the condition, but did not have it.  Global Down Syndrome.org mentions that,  “Originally, it was referred to as his syndrome – Down’s Syndrome.  In the UK, Europe and many other countries, the correct term still remains “Down’s Syndrome.” In the U.S., it was changed to Down syndrome (drop the possessive) as to emphasize that it was not Dr. Down who had the syndrome nor was it his”.

My son Nick is 22 years old, and has Down syndrome and autism.  I’ve heard all of these incorrect phrases over the years. Please help me educate the public on the proper way to refer to a person with Down syndrome.  Thank you for reading and spreading awareness about Down syndrome.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 

Follow Nick:

scan0016

@Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism:

Facebook  pintrest

#nickdsautism:

instagram-logo

@tjunnerstall: Twitter

DSAwarenessMagnet

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog 139~World Down Syndrome Day 2016

Blog 139~World Down Syndrome Day 2016

wdsd2016

Today is the United Nations official recognition of World Down Syndrome Day (WDSD)!   The date for WDSD being the 21st day of the 3rd month was selected to signify the uniqueness of the triplication (trisomy) of the 21st chromosome which causes Down syndrome.”

trisomy 21

“Down syndrome is a naturally occurring chromosomal arrangement that has always been a part of the human condition, being universally present across racial, gender or socio-economic lines, and affecting approximately 1 in 800 live births, although there is considerable variation worldwide. Down syndrome usually causes varying degrees of intellectual and physical disability and associated medical issues” Courtesy of Wikipedia

Each year the voice of people with Down’s syndrome and those who live and work with them join together to focus attention on what it means to have Down syndrome and how those with the condition play a vital role in communities across the world.  My son, Nick is 22 years old and has Down syndrome (Trisomy 21) and autism.  He has touched more lives than I could have ever imagined.

IMG01

Events to raise public awareness to create a single global voice are listed on their website: www.worlddownsyndromeday.org.

Our local support group here in Chicago has been a lifesaver for 15 years. Check out their site, it’s loaded with good information:  National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS) http://www.nads.org.

Nick participating in music therapy at the NADS Retreat….

Nick

NADS is doing a 21 Day challenge.  Click here if you would like donate just $21 @http://nads.us10.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=9922ff656d4cb30bb58c685cc&id=26f657228a&e=9cb0029bf5

How does the future look regarding research and Down syndrome?  LuMind Research Down Syndrome Foundation leads the charge in cognition science and research http://www.lumindrds.org:

Their mission is to stimulate biomedical research that will accelerate the development of treatments to improve cognition, including memory, learning and speech for individuals with Down syndrome so they can:

*Lead more active independent lives

*Participate more successfully in school

*Avoid early onset of Alzheimer’s disease

In the U.S., there are 250,000-400,000 persons with Down syndrome and these individuals are 3-5 times more likely to develop early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. Despite these numbers, there remains a great need for pharmacologic therapies to improve learning and behavioral challenges, as well as the increased likelihood for Alzheimer’s disease in persons with Down syndrome.

Today,  LuMind is hosting a virtual run fundraiser. In addition, there are other opportunities for runners to raise money towards this cause.  Click here for more information: http://www.lumindrds.org/ . Follow them on Facebook @LuMind RDS

Happy World Down Syndrome Day from Nick!  He’s an awesome guy.  The future looks bright and I look forward to sharing more about his journey. Thank you for reading and sharing WDSD 2016. Has someone with Down syndrome touched your life? I’d love to hear about it. That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa

Nick in the Diveheart Scuba Program, never set limits….

Diveheart 2013 336

Follow Nick:

Facebook @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

instagram-logo#nickdsautism

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Health Issues and Special Needs Child, Physical Therapy and Special Needs, Speech and Occupational Therapy

Blog #127~So, Your Baby has Down syndrome

Blog #127~So, Your Baby has Down syndrome        

In October everything turns pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month. But did you know it’s also Down Syndrome Awareness Month?

Twenty-one years ago I gave birth to my son Nick. The doctor detected several markers that he might have Down syndrome.  The next day, a hospital social worker handed me two brochures about Down syndrome. That is was what I had to work off of.

Here are the facts about Down syndrome courtesy of The National Down Syndrome Society, www.ndss.org:

  • Down syndrome occurs when an individual has a full or partial extra copy of chromosome 21. This additional genetic material alters the course of development and causes the characteristics associated with Down syndrome.
  • There are three types of Down syndrome: trisomy 21 (nondisjunction) accounts for 95 percent of cases, translocation accounts for about 4 percent and mosaicism accounts for about 1 percent.
  • Down syndrome is the most commonly occurring chromosomal condition. One in every 691 babies in the United States is born with Down syndrome.
  • There are more than 400,000 people living with Down syndrome in the United States.
  • Down syndrome occurs in people of all races and economic levels.
  • The incidence of births of children with Down syndrome increases with the age of the mother. But due to higher fertility rates in younger women, 80 percent of children with Down syndrome are born to women younger than 35.
  • People with Down syndrome have an increased risk for certain medical conditions such as congenital heart defects, respiratory and hearing problems, Alzheimer’s disease, childhood leukemia and thyroid conditions. Many of these conditions are now treatable, so most people with Down syndrome lead healthy lives.
  • A few of the common physical traits of Down syndrome are low muscle tone, small stature, an upward slant to the eyes and a single deep crease across the center of the palm. Every person with Down syndrome is a unique individual and may possess these characteristics to different degrees or not at all.
  • Life expectancy for people with Down syndrome has increased dramatically in recent decades — from 25 years old in 1983 to 60 years old today.
  • People with Down syndrome attend school, work and participate in decisions that affect them, and contribute to society in many wonderful ways.
  • All people with Down syndrome experience cognitive delays, but the effect is usually mild to moderate and is not indicative of the many strengths and talents that each individual possesses.
  • Quality educational programs, a stimulating home environment, good health care and positive support from family, friends and the community enable people with Down syndrome to develop their full potential and lead fulfilling lives.

I think back on that 33-year-old mom who was unsure of her future. What advice would I give her today?

Down syndrome journey

First, I would say that everything is going to be OK. The path will be different and move slower. But your child will work through the low muscle tone with the help of early intervention programs. The benchmarks like sitting up, crawling, walking and eating solid food will take longer to reach. Try to be patient and rest assured that your child will hit them.

Nick, age one….

scan0009

The next thing I would tell her is that there will be angels that light a path along the way. Embrace them and incorporate what you learn at home. The speech therapists will teach him how to blow bubbles, work on lip closure, feeding and to use sign language along with songs to communicate. The occupational and physical therapists will guide him in fine and gross motor skills. The teachers will hold the lantern and illuminate his mind. The social support groups will be your shoulders to lean on.

scan0016

Finally, I would share this message. Your baby was born with Down syndrome, but they are a person first. People with Down syndrome experience the same emotions that you and I do. Your life will change for the better as you savor the sweet victories. They will steal your heart and touch others in ways you can’t imagine. Your child will bring a unique perspective of seeing the best of the human spirit.

Nick in Sox hat

This is my advice to the young mother who just gave birth to a beautiful baby, who just happens to have Down syndrome. That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Posted in Down syndrome, Government/Legal Matters Related to Special Needs, Uncategorized

World Down Syndrome Day

WORLD DOWN SYNDROME DAY!!!

This Saturday, March 21st is World Down Syndrome Day!

World Down Syndrome Day (WDSD) is a global awareness day which has been officially observed by the United Nations since 2012. Each year the voice of people with Down syndrome, and those who live and work with them, grows louder (www.worlddownsyndromeday.org)  

Big Guy Nick 🙂

IMG01

Help me spread the word on social media.  Click on my blog to find out more about WDSD @https://nickspecialneeds.wordpress.com/2014/03/24/blog-89-world-…n-syndrome-day/

Thank you for reading and sharing this information about World Down Syndrome Day.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Government/Legal Matters Related to Special Needs

Blog #89~ World Down Syndrome Day

Blog #89~ World Down Syndrome Day

The United Nations official recognition of World Down Syndrome Day is March 21st. “Each year the voice of people with Down’s syndrome and those who live and work with them join together to focus attention on what it means to have Down syndrome and how those with the condition play a vital role in communities across the world.”  Click on the site below to view events to raise public awareness to create a single global voice @www.worlddownsyndromeday.org.

WDSD Socks

According to Wikipedia, “Down syndrome is a naturally occurring chromosomal arrangement that has always been a part of the human condition, being universally present across racial, gender or socio-economic lines, and affecting approximately 1 in 800 live births, although there is considerable variation worldwide. Down syndrome usually causes varying degrees of intellectual and physical disability and associated medical issues. The date for WDSD being the 21st day of the 3rd month, was selected to signify the uniqueness of the triplication (trisomy) of the 21st chromosome which causes Down syndrome.”

trisomy 21

The Secretary-General of the United Nations Ban Ki-moon said on 21 March 2012, “On this day, let us reaffirm that persons with Down syndrome are entitled to the full and effective enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms. Let us each do our part to enable children and persons with Down syndrome to participate fully in the development and life of their societies on an equal basis with others. Let us build an inclusive society for all.”

keep calm

World Down syndrome Day.org gives this message on it’s website, “People with Down syndrome face many challenges as children and adults which may prevent them enjoying their basic human rights. Many people often fail to understand that people with Down syndrome are people first, who may require additional support, but should be recognised by society on an equal basis with others, without discrimination on the basis of disability.”

Big Guy, Nick 🙂

IMG01

My son Nick, is a young adult who has Down syndrome.  He has so much to offer and has brought so much joy to the world.  He’s made me a better person in the process.  If you would like more specific information on Down syndrome click here @https://nickspecialneeds.wordpress.com/2012/10/15/blog-26-down-s…wareness-month/

Please help me spread the word about World Down Syndrome this week on social media.  That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa