Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Education and Special Needs, IEP (Indivdualized Education Plan)

Blog #199~Take Action Before the School Year Ends

Blog #199~Take Action Before the School Year Ends

How’s the school year going?  If you have a child with special needs; who is non-verbal or limited in speech, it’s difficult to know how they are navigating their day.  This is where you as the parent, have to be pro-active regarding your child’s progress.  Are they achieving the goals set in their Individual Education Plan (IEP)?  As a parent of a child with a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism, I’ve learned the importance of staying on top of my son’s progress and behavior while in school.  Mid-year is a critical time to re-evaluate the teaching methods and current goals set in place, to help your child succeed.

Here are five things parents can do now, to take action before the school year ends:

#1 How are you communicating with the school staff?

If you child is non-verbal or limited in speech, it’s imperative to find a way to dispatch information daily via email, text and/or a communication notebook.  Daily reports work can be created and customized to share about your child’s day, like these……

daily check sheet   daily check sheet two

#2 Organize all correspondence with the school and staff.

Use one notebook or binder for all meetings, conferences and IEP’s so you can refer back at anytime.  Keep all documents in this binder regarding your child, so it’s at your fingertips.  Log in dates and times of any correspondence with school.  Keep all school emails in a separate folder, on your computer.

#3 Review your child’s Individual Education Plan (IEP).

The IEP outlines academic and functional goals, supports needed, accommodations and services. Compare the current IEP goals to the quarterly reports.  How much progress has your child made in each goal area?  Are there any red flags (No Progress- NP)?  Make notes of your concerns.  What additional supports or accommodations that might better help your child succeed?

Examples of supports and accommodations:

Ex/ Halls or assemblies are crowded and loud.  The student experiences sensory overload, leading to meltdowns.  Add supports and accommodations such as noise cancelling headphones paired with a break card.  Have the child transition five minutes before the bell rings when the halls are quiet.

Break Icon   noise cancelling headphones

Ex/ Student shuts down to avoids a task, because it is too difficult.  Break down the task into individual steps supported with a visual task strip.  Set them up for success!

counting task strip       Nick packaging door knobs_Habitat_4 (2)

#4 Contact your child’s teacher to discuss ways to keep your child on track for the rest of the school year.

Request a meeting with the IEP team if there are setbacks in behavior, or “No Progress” (NP) being made on IEP goals.  Goals and the behavior plan can be adjusted anytime during the school year.  A meeting may be necessary if there are any new behavior problems that need to be addressed.

Ex/ Student needs motivation to complete work.  Create an incentive chart to work and earn a reward.  Brainstorm with the school staff to find a reward that is highly motivating for the student.  This  particular reward should only available upon completion of tasks.

working for chart

Ex/ Student has difficulties transitioning to the  next activity.  Make visual schedules for the student to navigate their daily routine.  Giving the student control with visuals, will help to reduce anxiety, and foster independent living skills.

APE swimming 006 (4)

Visual timers help a student stay on task, and then transition to the next activity….

visual timer app

#5 Look at the big picture of your child’s current growth and well-being.

Are the current goals ultimately promoting your child’s further education, employment and independent living?  Are the goals meaningful and relevant for their level of performance?

Does your child look forward to going to school each day?  Are there any signs that your child is withdrawing or regressing in performance and behavior?

Make notes and meet with the teacher at any time before the next IEP meeting. Collaborte together with the school IEP team, to make adjustments and accommodations as needed regarding goals and behavior.

IEP-Picture

Consistent communication, organization, and IEP goal and behavior reviews, are essential for a parent to do, throughout the school year.  Collaboration with the school staff will ensure a strong finish, for the remaining semester.  This will also make team planning for the next school year much easier, with no surprises.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

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Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Education and Special Needs, IEP (Indivdualized Education Plan)

3 Scary Letters: IEP

3 Scary Letters: IEP

brace yourself IEP

Hey parents, is it time for your child’s  IEP meeting?  Are you armed and ready?  After 22 years with my son Nick who has Down syndrome and autism, I’ve learned a few things.  IEP meetings don’t have to be scary.  Click here to find out how you can be ready for one:

@https://nickspecialneeds.wordpress.com/2012/05/21/blog-8-3-letters/

Please leave me a comment if you have any questions or need support.  I am here to help!  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa

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Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Education and Special Needs, IEP (Indivdualized Education Plan)

Parent Tips for Better IEP Meetings

Parent Tips for Better IEP Meetings

It’s that time of year when parents hold their breath in anticipation of IEP meetings.  IEP stands for “Individualized Education Plan”.  An IEP is done for a student who has special needs. These meetings are held each year to update the student’s current level of functioning, progress and goal planning for the following year.

brace yourself IEP

Many parents dread these meetings. I was one of those parents who did for many years.  But after 21 years I’ve learned a few things on how to make these both productive and cooperative.  My son, Nick has Down syndrome and autism.  Here are some parent tips for better IEP meetings:

https://nickspecialneeds.wordpress.com/2014/03/17/blog-88-parent…r-iep-meetings/

Thank you for reading and sharing Nick’s world.  That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Education and Special Needs, IEP (Indivdualized Education Plan)

Blog #88~ Parent Tips for Better IEP Meetings

Blog #88~ Parent Tips for Better IEP Meetings

My 20-year-old son, Nick has Down syndrome and autism. While driving to his IEP meeting last Monday it occurred to me that he only had one more of these next year.  With 15+ IEP meetings under my belt, I have learned a lot about how to become an effective advocate for my son.  IEP stands for “Individualized Education Plan”.  An IEP is done for a student who has special needs. These meetings are held each year to update the student’s current level of functioning, progress and goal planning for the following year.   There was a time when I was terrified and intimidated by IEP meetings. Here are some things I’ve learned to make an IEP meeting be effective and run smoothly.

brace yourself IEP

Nick’s senior portrait…… 🙂

scan0016

Here are my top 10 parent tips for better IEP meetings:

1. Establish communication with all the teachers, therapists, and other key members of the IEP team via email.  Send a communication notebook back and forth in your child’s backpack.   Attend conferences, open house events and if you can, chaperone at field trips and volunteer in the classroom.  All of these things will help to build a relationship with the staff and making you feel more comfortable. 

2. Designate one notebook for all meetings, conferences and trainings related to your child.  Keep a folder for the current IEP and progress reports.  Review these prior to the meeting. 

3. After you review your child’s goals, make notes for the support teacher/case manager of what you’d like to see for the upcoming year using an “IEP planning form”. Click on the link at the end of this blog to obtain a form.   

4. Request a copy of the IEP draft (including present level of academic functioning, and all proposed goals) to review BEFORE the meeting.  Go through this with a fine tooth comb making notes in red ink of any questions you have or things you would like to see added. 

5. Learn your child’s educational rights. Click on Wrightslaw link provided at the end of this blog below. 

6. Don’t hesitate to ask questions and seek clarification. 

7. If you feel unsure or overwhelmed bring an advocate from your local support group or a seasoned IEP parent to the meeting. 

8. Keep in mind that according to the law; schools do not have to offer the best, they have to offer what is “most appropriate” for your child. 

9. The child should be the center of focus at the IEP meeting.  A parent’s dream for their child may not be what the reality is.  Keep an open mind to this. 

10. You know your child the best.  You are a equal part of the team, speak up!

photo (116)

If you have serious doubts or concerns about the IEP, ask to take it home and review it further.  You are NOT required to sign it if you disagree or have any uncertainties.  You only need to sign that attended the meeting.  Put any concerns that you have in writing and returned them to school with the unsigned IEP.  You can request another IEP meeting.

IEP Planning Form for Parents:

http://www.greatschools.org/pdfs/2200_21-IEPplanning.pdf?date=3-11-02

Special Education Rights:

http://www.wrightslaw.com

IEP meetings don’t have to be a scary thing.  Do your homework beforehand. If you are prepared and keep the lines of communication open, then they can run quite smoothly.  That’s what is in my noggin this week! 🙂

~Teresa 🙂