Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Education and Special Needs, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #221~Inclusion in a General Education Classroom for Students with Down Syndrome

Blog #221~Inclusion in a General Education Classroom for Students with Down Syndrome

Down syndrome awareness ribbon

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month.  An individual with Down syndrome can be included in a general education classroom with the right support, accommodations and curriculum modifications.  This requires collaboration with the school team and understanding the needs of the student.  Inclusion education happens when children with and without disabilities participate and learn together in the same classes.  How can you advocate for an inclusive education environment for a student having Down syndrome?

*Inclusion in a general education classroom starts with a school team who is aware and understands what the experience can look like.  If the school does not support inclusion, the parent (and bringing an advocate on board) can help to educate the staff.  There is no one size fits all on inclusion, as each student is individual and unique in their needs. Inclusion is not a place, but rather an experience. Finding the right teachers, who are willing to set an open environment in the general education classroom is also a key ingredient to the success of inclusion.

Here are some examples of how inclusion can work:

http://www.friendshipcircle.org/blog/2014/02/05/10-examples-of-inclusion-for-those-who-need-to-se

Educate your school and community by hosting a screening for Inclusive Schools Week.  “Inclusive Schools Week is a proud partner with INTELLIGENT LIVES, the groundbreaking new documentary by Dan Habib. Narrated by Academy-award winning actor Chris Cooper, the film stars three pioneering young adults with intellectual disabilities – Micah, Naieer, and Naomie – who challenge perceptions of intelligence as they navigate high school, college, and the workforce. The film can now be screened in every community across the USA – host your own screening for Inclusive Schools Week! Intelligent Lives can help you advocate for change, raise funds for your organization, and open doors to inclusive education and employment for people of ALL abilities.” Go to http://www.intelligentlives.org to watch the film trailer and to learn how to host a screening in your communitye-it-to-believe-it/

Watch the trailer:  https://intelligentlives.org/trailer

*Create a one page profile sheet of your child to share with the school team and class.  There are many great ideas on Pinterest to create this.  

Here are some suggestions with examples on what to include:

-Picture of student

-Strengths (counting, matching, visual learner, receptive language, funny, wants to work)

-What works for student (visual schedule, patience, positive reinforcement, reminders before transitions)

-What doesn’t work for the student (sudden changes in schedule, taking something away, saying no or talking to firmly)

-What the student enjoys (music, making friends, Starfall computer game, dancing)

What the student needs (checklists, visual schedules, motor breaks, sensory break area, etc.)

*Inclusion works best with a solid Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and when the student is supported with a classroom aide/paraprofessional.  

Nick work aid

*Inclusion works best when the IEP includes all needed accommodations and modifications in the curriculum.  Accommodations are the tools needed for the student to succeed in the classroom.  Some examples might include a special pencil grip, nubby seat cushion, visual timer, calculator, built in motor breaks, communication device or picture exchange system (PECS) book.  Modifications to the curriculum allow the student to learn the grade level material , but simplified.  This helps the student learn at their own level what is most meaningful for them.  Goals in the IEP should be driven to promote further education, independence and future employment skills.

Here are two books that I recommend for learning more about how inclusion works for individuals with Down syndrome:

Inclusion in ActionWho's The Slow Learner

As I mentioned in last week’s blog post, Woodbine House also has many books about teaching reading and math skills for individuals with Down syndrome.  This month Woodbine House is offering a 30% discount on these books:

Click here to view the selections https://www.woodbinehouse.com/

Inclusion in a general education classroom can work for individuals with Down syndrome.  It benefits all students, and promotes a since of community and acceptance, that individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities desire.  With the right attitude, support, accommodations and modifications, inclusion in a regular classroom setting can be a rewarding and successful experience for individuals with Down syndrome, their peers and the school staff.

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow my son Nick who is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram @nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness

Blog #219~ The Faces of Down Syndrome

Blog #219~The Faces of Down Syndrome

The faces of Down syndrome are more prominent in 2018, than they were 24 years ago when my son, Nick was born.  Acceptance and inclusion are two things we advocate everyday, and especially in the month of October, which is Down Syndrome Awareness Month.

Down syndrome awareness month

This week I want to highlight some of the faces of individuals with Down syndrome who are making a difference, by advocating acceptance and inclusion.  There are more models with Down syndrome in the media, thanks to companies like Target and all the way up to New York fashion week.  In addition, television shows are featuring actors with Down syndrome.  Trailblazers are advocating for job opportunities and making a difference.  Here are some of the faces of individuals who have Down syndrome, and advocates who are paving the way.

btway

*A&E’s Emmy winning series Born this Way 🙂

“Winner of the 2016 Emmy Award for Outstanding Unstructured Reality Program, Born This Way follows a group of seven young adults born with Down syndrome as they pursue their passions and lifelong dreams, explore friendships, romantic relationships and work, all while defying society’s expectations.  In their willingness and courage to openly share their lives, through a lens that is not often shown on television, we learn they have high hopes just like anyone else. The series also gives voice to the parents, allowing them to talk about the joy their son or daughter brings to their family, and the challenges they face in helping them live as independently as possible”.

Read my exclusive interview with Sandra Assismotos McElwee (author of Who’s the Slow Learner? A Chronicle of Inclusion & Exclusion) and mother of cast mate Sean McElwee here: https://nickspecialneeds.com/?s=born+this+way

*CNN’s Hero of the Year Amy Wright of Bitty and Beau’s Coffee 🙂

bitty and beau coffee shop

CNN Heroes is a television special created by CNN to honor individuals who make extraordinary contributions to humanitarian aid and make a difference in their communities. Amy Wright started a grass-roots movement, opening up Bitty & Beau’s Coffee, which is located in Wilmington, NC. National statistics have shown that 70% of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are unemployed. Her mission is to provide purposeful jobs that bring the community together, and helps people with and without disabilities to spend time together.

Read my blog about Bitty and Beau’s Coffee: https://nickspecialneeds.com/?s=bitty+and+bo

*Firestarter Advocating for Inclusion on Capitol Hill David Egan 🙂

Firestarters

One of the featured individuals in the book Firestarters is David Egan.  David is the first person with an intellectual disability to be awarded a Joseph P. Kennedy JR. Public Policy Fellowship, he made history by working on Capitol Hill with the Ways and Means Social Security Subcommittee. David Egan, born with Down syndrome, is a trailblazer for others who have intellectual disabilities.

David-Egan-Capitol-Hill-2011

Read more about this Firestarter David Egan and co-author Paul Eder in my exclusive interview at this link: https://nickspecialneeds.com/?s=firestarter

*We are seeing more actors and models with Down syndrome in prominent roles! 🙂

Chris Burke was a trailblazer starring in the TV series, Life Goes On:

Chris Burke 2

Lauren Potter star of Fox’s hit show Glee:

potter27.jpg

Jamie Brewer stars in American Horror Story:

American Horror Story jamie Brewer

Madeline Stuart and Maria Avila are changing the face of beauty and diversity in the world of fashion, both have walked at NY Fashion Week!

madeline stuart    maria avila

*2018 Gerber Spokes Baby Lucas Warren 🙂 

Gerber baby 2018

Read more about 2018 Gerber Baby, Lucas in my blog: https://nickspecialneeds.com/?s=gerber+baby

It’s wonderful to see more of these beautiful faces in the media.  How amazing to read about advocates who are opening up doors for employment and being applauded for their efforts!  Individuals with Down syndrome have goals and dreams, and want the same things as everyone else.  They need opportunities and to be included without barriers.  Let’s move beyond awareness about Down syndrome, towards acceptance and inclusion!

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow my son, Nick where you will find more stories and faces of DS:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism

Blog #200~World Down Syndrome Day

Blog #200~World Down Syndrome Day

“World Down Syndrome Day is Wednesday, March 21, 2018 and its purpose is to raise awareness around the world of what Down syndrome is and the vital role people with Down syndrome play in our society. The day has been officially observed by the United Nations since 2012 and the date — always on the 21st day of the 3rd month — is meant to highlight the uniqueness of the triplication (trisomy) of the 21st chromosome, which is the cause of Down syndrome.”

World Down-Syndrome-Day

World Down Syndrome Day is an opportunity for all of us to promote awareness, understanding and inclusion.  Lack of knowledge and understanding can prevent people with Down syndrome from being accepted and included in society.  The message is simple, every individual is unique, we all have value, and everyone has the right to live a happy and fulfilling life.  I heard a great quote the other day, “Down syndrome is just another way that humanity presents itself”.  

DSAwarenessMagnet

So, how can we promote awareness, understanding, inclusion and acceptance? 

Three Easy Ways To Promote World Down Syndrome Day:

1. Promote Down syndrome awareness on social media.  Rock your funky socks and T-shirts.  Let’s see them on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.  Share inspiring, beautiful pictures, stories and videos of individuals with Down syndrome.  Tell us how an individual with Down syndrome has affected your life. Use hashtags, here are a few suggestions-  #wdsd #downsyndrome #321 #abilities #inclusion #funkysocks #downsyndromerocks #PROVETHEMWRONG

Nick Prove Them Wrong

My son Nick (pictured above) is 24 years old, and has Down syndrome and autism.  We’ve joined Noah’s Dad-Down syndrome awareness in their campaign #PROVETHEMWRONG.  More information at http://noahsdad.com/

2. Educate others about Down syndrome and encourage the use of person first language.  This means saying, “a person or individual with Down syndrome”.

Do NOT say:
* “A Down syndrome baby, child or kid.”
* “Down’s baby, child or kid”
* “Down’s”
* “He or she has Downs”

3. Encourage inclusion in your community.  What opportunities are available for meaningful jobs, volunteer work and other contributions for individuals with Down syndrome?  Are there any fundraisers like the Buddy Walk, funky sock campaign or other local DS support group activities, that you could get involved in?  Adults teens and children can volunteer to help with programs like the Special Olympics, Best Buddies peer program, and GiGi’s Playhouse.

Nick volunteering at GiGi’s Playhouse…..

nick-cleaning-gigis

Here’s an amazing business:  Bitty & Beau’s Coffee is more than just a place to grab a cup of coffee – it’s an experience. While the shop is run by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and the customers love the products, they really come in for the unique customer service experience……..

bitty and beau coffee shop

Promoting awareness on social media, educating others about Down syndrome to use person first language, and finding inclusion opportunities are three great ways you can  support World Down Syndrome Day 3/21/18!  Help others to gain a better understanding, acceptance and inclusion for individuals with Down syndrome.  Let’s look past the diagnosis and see the uniqueness of each individual and their vital role to our society.  I can’t wait to see your posts on social media and rocking those funky socks for WDSD 2018!

We Help Two funky socks available at http://www.wehelptwo.com/ ………

That’s what is in my noggin this week!

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick on Social Media:

 Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism 

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Recreation/Leisure and Special Needs

Blog #190~Nick & Buddy Up Tennis

Blog #190~ Nick & Buddy Up Tennis

I took my son Nick, to the Buddy Up Tennis program over the weekend.  Buddy Up Tennis is a high-energy, adaptive tennis and fitness program for children and young adults with Down syndrome.  They provide fun and rewarding 90-minute clinics on a weekly basis.  The program currently serves 550 individuals ages five to young adults with Down syndrome across the country.  Honestly, I wasn’t sure how cooperative Nick would be given that he has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.  I am happy to report that he participated and followed directions fairly well, for his first time out.

Nick buddy tennis 2

This 90 minute Buddy Up Tennis-Naperville clinic, is held at Five Star Tennis Center.  Athletes are paired with a buddy and start off with a warm up.  Each participant gets to toss the dice and perform a variety of calisthenic exercises like toe touches, push-ups, jumping jacks and sit ups.  Nick needed some prompting on these.  I had to laugh when everyone got down to do push ups and Nick was still standing.  Then about the time he got down on all fours, the rest of the group was up doing jumping jacks. 🙂

fitness dice                Buddy Up Tennis Logo

After the warm-up, the participants break up into groups.  The younger kids use modified equipment and balls on a separate court.  The teens and young adults move to circuit training.  Stations are set up focus on balance, agility, hand-eye coordination and upper body movements that mimic tennis strokes and serves.

Nick navigated each station with prompts, praise and elbow bumps, from his buddies and coaches.  He moved at a slower pace than his peers, and there were a few stations he was less interested in.  But overall, did a good job!

Nick Buddy Tennis balance

After circuit training, the athletes worked on volleys and ground strokes.  Nick needed more prompting and hand over hand assistance, to move through these drills.  But he remained patient and compliant.  It really helped to have a peer partner and the coaches cheering him on, as well as the other athletes modeling appropriate behavior.

Nick buddy tennis

Towards the end of the clinic, Nick did begin to lose interest in hitting tennis balls.  I grabbed a ball hopper, and he and his peer buddy collected balls.  Nick is good at putting things away, so this kept him perked him up and engaged.  For the last 10 minutes, all the groups come together, and play a few rounds of duck, duck, goose. Then, the coaches present certificates to the top awesome athletes for that week.  Nick was awarded one of these for working hard.  Yay Big Guy! 🙂

Overall, I feel the experience was a success for Nick.  I was a little nervous going in, because he can be loud and distracting with the stimming behaviors associated with autism.  However, these behaviors were quite diminished during the clinic.  It reminded me of when Nick was in a full inclusion classroom, when we first moved into the Chicago area, 15 years ago.  Positive peer role models is one of the benefits of placing your child in full inclusion classroom.  When Nick was in a full inclusion classroom, the loud noises, tapping and other stimming decreased.  That alone, makes it worthwhile to enroll him in the next session coming up in January.

I plan on making a few visuals of the calisthenic exercises, circuit stations and sequence of moving through the drills will help with transitioning.  For individuals with autism, it helps to have a picture schedule to assist them in understanding what is expected of them.  If they can see it, they can better understand it.

Buddy Up Tennis is a wonderful program, and I’d like to thank the coaches and volunteers for the opportunity to have Nick be a part of group.  For more information about Buddy Up Tennis, visit their website at http://buddyuptennis.com/

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

Facebook & Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness

World Down Syndrome Day

world-down-syndrome-day

World Down Syndrome Day (WDSD), observed on 21 March every year, is a global awareness day which has been officially observed by the United Nations since 2012.  On this day, people with Down syndrome and those who live and work with them throughout the world organize and participate in activities and events to raise public awareness and create a single global voice for advocating for the rights, inclusion and well-being of people with Down syndrome. Many of these events are recorded on the official World Down Syndrome Day website.  The date for WDSD being the 21st day of the 3rd month, was selected to signify the uniqueness of the triplication (trisomy) of the 21st chromosome which causes Down syndrome.

DSAwarenessMagnet

WDSD 2017 Call to action is, #MyVoiceMyCommunity – Enabling people with Down syndrome to speak up, be heard and influence government policy and action, to be fully included in the community.  For more information visit: http://www.worlddownsyndromeday.org

My son Nick, is 23 years old and has Down syndrome and autism.  He participates fully in an adult day program, with enriching activities in the facility as well as the community, including volunteer jobs.

IMG01

We can all help to promote awareness on social media and spread a positive message for  people with Down syndrome.

Thank you to everyone who ordered funky socks from WeHelpTwo.  Our campaign helped to raise money for The National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS), http://www.nads.org, here in the Chicago area.  In addition, WeHelpTwo  is donating a pair of thermal socks for every pack we sold to our local homeless shelter.  The campaign ends at the end of this month.

warm-sock-photo

To order socks click here:  https://my.wehelptwo.com/campaign?=1&id=373

Nick and I can’t wait to see you all rock your funky socks, tomorrow.  Please post your pictures on our social media sites below!

Together, we can create a loud voice for better understanding, and advocating for rights, inclusion, and well-being for people having Down syndrome.  That’s what’s in my noggin this week.

wdsd2016

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism on Facebook and Pinterest

#nickdsautism on Instagram

#tjunnerstall on Twitter