Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Education and Special Needs, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #221~Inclusion in a General Education Classroom for Students with Down Syndrome

Blog #221~Inclusion in a General Education Classroom for Students with Down Syndrome

Down syndrome awareness ribbon

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month.  An individual with Down syndrome can be included in a general education classroom with the right support, accommodations and curriculum modifications.  This requires collaboration with the school team and understanding the needs of the student.  Inclusion education happens when children with and without disabilities participate and learn together in the same classes.  How can you advocate for an inclusive education environment for a student having Down syndrome?

*Inclusion in a general education classroom starts with a school team who is aware and understands what the experience can look like.  If the school does not support inclusion, the parent (and bringing an advocate on board) can help to educate the staff.  There is no one size fits all on inclusion, as each student is individual and unique in their needs. Inclusion is not a place, but rather an experience. Finding the right teachers, who are willing to set an open environment in the general education classroom is also a key ingredient to the success of inclusion.

Here are some examples of how inclusion can work:

http://www.friendshipcircle.org/blog/2014/02/05/10-examples-of-inclusion-for-those-who-need-to-se

Educate your school and community by hosting a screening for Inclusive Schools Week.  “Inclusive Schools Week is a proud partner with INTELLIGENT LIVES, the groundbreaking new documentary by Dan Habib. Narrated by Academy-award winning actor Chris Cooper, the film stars three pioneering young adults with intellectual disabilities – Micah, Naieer, and Naomie – who challenge perceptions of intelligence as they navigate high school, college, and the workforce. The film can now be screened in every community across the USA – host your own screening for Inclusive Schools Week! Intelligent Lives can help you advocate for change, raise funds for your organization, and open doors to inclusive education and employment for people of ALL abilities.” Go to http://www.intelligentlives.org to watch the film trailer and to learn how to host a screening in your communitye-it-to-believe-it/

Watch the trailer:  https://intelligentlives.org/trailer

*Create a one page profile sheet of your child to share with the school team and class.  There are many great ideas on Pinterest to create this.  

Here are some suggestions with examples on what to include:

-Picture of student

-Strengths (counting, matching, visual learner, receptive language, funny, wants to work)

-What works for student (visual schedule, patience, positive reinforcement, reminders before transitions)

-What doesn’t work for the student (sudden changes in schedule, taking something away, saying no or talking to firmly)

-What the student enjoys (music, making friends, Starfall computer game, dancing)

What the student needs (checklists, visual schedules, motor breaks, sensory break area, etc.)

*Inclusion works best with a solid Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and when the student is supported with a classroom aide/paraprofessional.  

Nick work aid

*Inclusion works best when the IEP includes all needed accommodations and modifications in the curriculum.  Accommodations are the tools needed for the student to succeed in the classroom.  Some examples might include a special pencil grip, nubby seat cushion, visual timer, calculator, built in motor breaks, communication device or picture exchange system (PECS) book.  Modifications to the curriculum allow the student to learn the grade level material , but simplified.  This helps the student learn at their own level what is most meaningful for them.  Goals in the IEP should be driven to promote further education, independence and future employment skills.

Here are two books that I recommend for learning more about how inclusion works for individuals with Down syndrome:

Inclusion in ActionWho's The Slow Learner

As I mentioned in last week’s blog post, Woodbine House also has many books about teaching reading and math skills for individuals with Down syndrome.  This month Woodbine House is offering a 30% discount on these books:

Click here to view the selections https://www.woodbinehouse.com/

Inclusion in a general education classroom can work for individuals with Down syndrome.  It benefits all students, and promotes a since of community and acceptance, that individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities desire.  With the right attitude, support, accommodations and modifications, inclusion in a regular classroom setting can be a rewarding and successful experience for individuals with Down syndrome, their peers and the school staff.

That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow my son Nick who is 24 years old and has a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram @nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Down syndrome, Down Syndrome Awareness, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #220~Down Syndrome Good Reads

Blog #220~Down Syndrome Good Reads

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month.  This week, I want to highlight books associated with Down syndrome.  You can click on my resource book shelf page, to view a comprehensive list of books:  https://nickspecialneeds.com/resource-book-shelf/

Woodbine House is the gold standard for resource books related to Down syndrome and other intellectual and developmental disabilities for parents, family members, children, teachers, and other professionals.  This publishing company has over 40 books on Down syndrome with a  30% discount this month! http://www.woodbinehouse.com/product-category/down-syndrome/

Woodbine House Sale

There are a lot more books on Amazon, related to Down syndrome.  One that caught my eye, with a 5 star rating and solid reviews is The Parent’s Guide To Down Syndrome by Jen Jacob and Madra Sikora.  The reviews for this book state that it is upbeat, current, informative, insightful, and a fun and easy read:

parents guide to DS book

https://www.amazon.com/Parents-Guide-Down-Syndrome-Information/dp/144059290X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1539620279&sr=8-1&keywords=The+parents+guide+to+Down+syndrome

In addition to books for parents, teachers and professionals, there are many children’s books about Down syndrome both on Amazon and in my resource book shelf link, that I listed above.

 

Promoting acceptance and inclusion are two goals of Down syndrome Awareness Month.  Many parents and advocates do presentations at schools and in their community, incorporating book reads and power point presentations to educate others.

Donating books to local public and school libraries is a great way to spread the word about Down syndrome.  Many Down syndrome support groups provide materials, like bookmarks and calendars, that can be distributed as well.  In addition, these support groups often provide training to become a speaker and advocate.  Check with your local support group to see if they have a resource libray with books, tech and other resources to help families who have a child with Down syndrome.

Gifts book cover

The books and links I provided here, will help parents, family members, teachers and professionals better support a child having Down syndrome.  In particular, the Woodbine House books provided me with encouragement, understanding and practical tips for growth/medical management, academic skills in reading/math, gross and fine motor development.  This gave me more confidence to better advocate and help my son, Nick who is now 24 years old.

I hope these good reads provide a lens on the subject of Down syndrome to further educate, and promote acceptance and inclusion.  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa 🙂

Follow Nick:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram @nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Dual Diagnosis Down syndrome and autism, Resources for Special Needs

Blog #192~Down syndrome-Autism: Green Monday Gift Ideas

Blog #192~Down syndrome-Autism:Green Monday Gift Ideas

green-monday

It’s green Monday and just two weeks until Christmas.  Here are some gift ideas for individuals having Down syndrome (or a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism, or other special needs) along with their caregivers, teachers/aids, and therapists.

http://papercloudsapparel.com/  Order T-shirts, hats and totes designed by artists with special needs

My son Nick, wearing a Paper Clouds Apparel shirt designed by Justin Lundeen…

nick fire truck shirt

https://www.riverbendgalleries.com/  Features the beautiful photography of artist, Geoffrey Mikol prints, framed art, calendars, coaster sets and greeting cards are available for purchase online….

Geoffrey Mikol picture    Geoffrey Mikol

http://specialsparkle.com Kelly is a young entrepreneur who has Down syndrome.  She designs and makes fashionable jewelry you can order online….

special sparkle jewelry

http://www.christianroyalpottery.com/pages/about  Beautiful pottery (bowls, platters, plates, jewelry) by Christian Royal…..

 

 

One of the best gifts is an iPad and there are countless apps for learning and play.  If you are looking for a sturdy case, the Go Talk Rugged and Big Grip cases have held up the best…..  

 

If your child has sensory needs, and likes to do a lot of dropping, check out these toys:

vortx-dropping-coins  marble racemagic-tracks-mega-set-360-piece--A817AA38.zoom

Gifts ideas in located in the archives, type this in the search box: Blog #131~Christmas Ideas for a Child With Special Needs…..

 

Gift ideas for babies and toddlers with Down syndrome: http://www.cedarsstory.com/?s=Best+Gift+Ideas

Noah’s Dad- Down syndrome Awareness Top 10 gifts for a 7 year old: http://noahsdad.com/7-year-old-gift-ideas/

Books for caregivers and families, here are a few suggestions and there are more listed in this Blog #144~ Inspiring Books Related to Down syndrome located in the archives……

 

Gifts book cover    Book An Uncomplicated Life  down syndrome and autism intersect

Please feel free to share this, and any of my blogs with others and on social media.  Also, check out my Pinterest page for more gift recommendations and other helpful information. Do you have any gift suggestions? I’m always looking for unique gift ideas related to Down syndrome and autism to post on my website.  Nick and I wish you all the best as you are preparing to enjoy the holiday season.

That’s what is in my noggin this week. 🙂

~Teresa

Follow Nick on Social Media:

Facebook and Pinterest @Down Syndrome With A Slice Of Autism

Instagram #nickdsautism

Twitter @tjunnerstall

 

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, Down syndrome, Resources for Special Needs, Uncategorized

Blog #144~Inspiring Books Related to Down Syndrome

Blog #144~Inspiring Books Related to Down Syndrome

As Mother’s Day approaches, I wanted to highlight a few more books.  These books would make a nice gift for a mom who has a child with Down syndrome.  My son Nick is 22 years old and has Down syndrome and autism.  It’s been quite a journey, one that I’ve been writing about for several years.  Here are a few books highlighted in this month’s newsletter from the National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS) www.nads.org.  Thank you NADS for the great list!  I also added in a couple of more that I found on Amazon:

Adams, Rachel, Raising Henry (Yale University Press, 2013).  A Columbia University professor reflects on raising her son with Down syndrome, on genetic testing and on the paradoxical role of disability in our culture.

Becker, Amy Julia, A Good and Perfect Gift: Faith, Expectations, and a Little Girl Named Penny (Bethany House Publishers, 2011).  The Princeton Theological Seminary graduate explores the changes in her life and faith after the birth of her daughter with Down syndrome.

Groeberg, Jennifer Graf, Road Map to Holland: How I found My Way Through My Son’s First Two Years With Down Syndrome (NAL Trade 2008).  A mother describes the period after her son’s birth.

Hale, Natalie, Down Syndrome Parenting 101: Must-Have Advice for Making Your Life Easier (Woodbine House, 2011).  Practical, uplifting advice covering important issues associated with Down syndrome.

Hampton, Kelle, Bloom: Finding Beauty in the Unexpected-A Memoir (William Morrow, 2012).  A popular blogger (Enjoying the Small Things) reflects on the changes in her life after the birth of her daughter with Down syndrome.

Lee, Marjorie Sullivan, Bloom where you are Planted (Tau-Publishing, 2012).   The story of her son Kevin, and how their lives were transformed becoming advocates for over four decades.

Murray, Kathleen PhD, Count It All Joy (Westbow Press 2015). A mother’s journey including lessons learned from her son with Down syndrome.

Silverman, Amy, My Heart Can’t Believe It: A Story of Science, Love and Down Syndrome (Woodbine House 2016).  Journalist, blogger and NPR contributor Amy Silverman recounts the impact on her life of the birth of her daughter Sophie, and the gradual evolution of her attitudes about Down syndrome.

Soper, Kathryn, The Year My Son and I Were Born (GPP Life 2010).  A memoir which records the author’s experiences after the birth of her son with Down syndrome.

Soper, Kathryn Gifts: Mothers Reflect on How Children with Down Syndrome Enrich Their Lives (Woodbine House, 2007). A collection of personal stories, sixty-three mothers describe the gifts of respect, strength, delight, perspective, and love, which their child with Down syndrome has brought into their lives.

Gifts book cover

Soper, Kathryn Gifts 2 How People With Down Syndrome Enrich the World (Woodbine House, 2009).  The follow-up to the bestselling first volume, Gifts 2 presents a broader perspective on Down syndrome and life by including passionate stories by siblings, grandparents, cousins, aunts and uncles, as well as mothers of older children. Friends, teachers, medical professionals, and coaches also share the joys of knowing and caring for someone with Down syndrome.

The power of a book can give you inspiration and hope.  Back in 1994, when Nick was just a few months old, I found that book.  Count Us In: Growing Up with Down Syndrome (A Harvest Book) was written by two young men, Jason Kingsley and Mitchell Levitz. I clung to every word. They shared their innermost thoughts, feelings, hopes, and dreams, their lifelong friendship—and their experiences growing up with Down syndrome.  The book is smart, charming, witty and truly shows their full potential. Thank you Jason and Mitchell!

In the current addition, the authors discuss their lives since then—milestones and challenges, developments expected and unexpected—in a new afterword….

Count Us In

Please feel free to share this book list and any of my blogs.  I write to raise awareness, and more important to offer hope and encouragement.  Next month, I will highlight books written by fathers!  That’s what is in my noggin this week.

~Teresa

Follow Nick:

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